Director: Louise Cainkar, Ph.D.

Reflecting the reality that questions of peace and justice permeate our lives, Peace Studies is one of the fastest growing academic fields. As a peace studies major or minor you can choose from classes in many disciplines (including political science, sociology, history, anthropology, theology, psychology, philosophy and other fields) to first understand the causes of conflict; second, develop ways to nonviolently prevent and resolve conflict; and third, build peaceful and just systems and societies. Through course work you analyze conflicts varying in scope from international to personal through lenses of peacemaking, conflict resolution, justice, human rights and development.

Peace studies emphasizes valuable skills such as strategic thinking, conflict resolution, creative problem solving, negotiation, persuasion, critical analysis and effective communication. These skills and experiences are attractive to a wide variety of employers including those in peace and development organizations, nonprofit and social service organizations, law (e.g., human rights, immigration), public health, journalism, counseling and more.

Peace Studies Major

The major consists of ten courses (30 credit hours). Four required courses (12 credit hours) and six elective courses (18 credit hours) chosen from any INPS elective and/or approved elective courses listed in the focal areas below. INPS 4997 Capstone Seminar in Peace Studies is normally taken during the student's last spring term in residence at Marquette.

Required Courses:
INPS 2010Introduction to Peace Studies3
THEO 2500Theologies of Nonviolence3
INPS 4997Capstone Seminar in Peace Studies3
One of the following:3
Communication and Conflict
Empathy, Crime and Justice
Conflict Resolution and Restorative Justice
World Conflict and Security
Elective Courses: Choose six courses from the following focal areas.18
Total Credit Hours30

Elective Course Options:

Focal Area One: Theories and Practices of Peacemaking

Analyze the underlying causes of violence and war. Learn strategies to resolve and transform conflict. Explore historic examples of nonviolent social change.

ANTH 4320Culture, Law and Violence3
CMST 3120Interpersonal Communication3
CMST 4150Communication and Conflict3
CMST 4160 Mediation Theory and Practice3
CMST 4400Cross-Cultural Communication3
INPS 3960Research in Peace Studies 1-3
MANA 3034Negotiation3
PHIL 3501Philosophy of War and Peace3
POSC 4631World Conflict and Security3
POSC 4636Terrorism3
PSYC 3201Introductory Social Psychology3
PSYC 3210The Psychology of Prejudice3
SOCI 3700Social Movements, Protest and Change3
SOCI 4400Social Inequality3
SOCI 4600The Social Reality of Crime and Justice3
SOWJ 2300Conflict Resolution and Restorative Justice3
SOWJ 2600Community Organizing3
SOWJ 3400Advocacy and Social Change: Theory and Practice3
SOWJ 4600Faith-based Activism3
THEO 2500Theologies of Nonviolence3
THEO 2500HHonors Theologies of Nonviolence3

Focal Area Two: Justice, Human Rights, and Reconciliation

Examine the social conditions and legal protections necessary for advancing and preserving human rights. Learn practices and policies that prevent conflict from erupting into violence and build a culture of sustainable peace, which includes such fundamentals as human rights, the rule of law, and an equitable economy.

CRLS 4180Empathy, Crime and Justice3
EDUC 1000Educational Inquiry 1: Critical Perspectives on Education3
ENGL 4840Postcolonial Literatures3
FREN 4330Francophone Studies in Human Rights3
HIST 4460Modern South Africa3
PHIL 3710Political Philosophy3
PHIL 3750Philosophy of Law3
PHIL 4320Contemporary Ethical Problems3
PHIL 4330Business Ethics3
POSC 4251The Politics of Civil Rights and Liberties3
POSC 4601International Law3
POSC 4611International Organizations3
POSC 4633Human Security3
POSC 4646Politics of Migration3
POSC 4651The Politics of Human Rights3
SOWJ 2150Immigrants and their Communities3

Focal Area Three: Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice and Sustainability

Explore issues of access to basic needs, human rights, social justice, and equitable and sustainable uses of resources. Study social systems, such as education and health, that promote resilient communities.

BISC 4381Politics of U.S. Health Care3
BISC 4461Comparative Health Politics and Policy3
ECON 4016Environmental and Natural Resource Economics3
ECON 4047Development Economics3
ENGL 4850Global Literatures 3
HEAL 1025Culture and Health3
NURS 1001Nursing and Health in the Jesuit Tradition3
PHIL 3350Philosophy of the Environment3
POSC 4281Urban Public Policy3
POSC 4351Environmental Politics and Policy3
POSC 4641Politics of the Illicit Global Economy3
POSC 4661The Political Economy of Development3
SOWJ 4700Global Aid and Humanitarianism3
THEO 4440Foundations of Ecological Ethics3
ECON 1040Introduction to the Global Economy3
FINA 4370Sustainable Finance3
HEAL 1400Veteran Health and Culture3
HIST 3800Environmental History: Ecology and Society in the Modern World3
PHYS 1009Earth and Environmental Physics3
SOCI 3720Environment and Society3
SOCI 4730Capitalism and Society3
THEO 3530Theology and Economics3
THEO 3530HHonors Theology and Economics 3

Focal Area Four:  Structural Violence and Positive Social Change

Investigate complex issues of structural exclusion and violence at the intersection of social class, gender, sexuality, race, national origin, affiliation, region and religion. Learn strategies that hold out the promise for positive social change in emerging peace research.

COMM 4500Race and Gender Issues in Mass Media3
CRLS 3640Domestic Violence in the United States3
CRLS 4140Race, Crime and Punishment3
CRLS 4640Family Violence and Public Intervention3
ENGL 4810Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies3
ENGL 4820Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies3
ENGL 4825Native American / Indigenous Literatures3
ENGL 4830Africana Literatures3
HIST 4135African-American History3
HIST 4155A History of Native America 3
HIST 4266Nazi Germany and the Holocaust3
HIST 4600Comparative Twentieth-Century Genocides3
MANA 3035Diversity in Organizations3
PHIL 3390Latin American Philosophy3
PHIL 3770Feminist Philosophy3
PHIL 3780Africana Philosophy3
SOCI 4250African-American Social Thought3
SOWJ 3450Arabs and Muslims in Global Context3
SOCI 4430Christianity and Sexuality in the U.S.3
SOCI 4450Sociology of Sex and Gender3
SPAN 4150Spanish in the United States3
THEO 3250Contemplation and Justice in a Violent World3
THEO 3420Bridging the Racial Divide3
THEO 3470Women and Theology Across Cultures3

Notes:

  • Relevant upper-division, independent study and special topics courses may be counted toward the elective requirements of the major/minor upon review of the course syllabus and approval by the director of the Peace Studies program. Once the course is completed a course waiver form is required to be submitted. 

  • To find peace studies related internships, summer fellowships and events, visit www.marquette.edu/peacemaking/.

  • In cases where courses have prerequisites, Peace Studies majors should contact the director of the Peace Studies program.

Peace Studies Minor

The minor consists of six courses (18 credit hours): two required courses (6 credit hours) and four elective courses (12 credit hours) chosen from any INPS elective or the approved elective courses listed in the focal areas below. INPS 4997 Capstone Seminar in Peace Studies is usually taken during the student's last spring term in residence at Marquette.
 
Required Courses:
INPS 2010Introduction to Peace Studies3
INPS 4997Capstone Seminar in Peace Studies3
Elective Courses: Choose four courses from the following focal areas.12
Focal Area One: Theories and Practices of Peacemaking
Culture, Law and Violence
Interpersonal Communication
Communication and Conflict
Mediation Theory and Practice
Cross-Cultural Communication
Research in Peace Studies
Negotiation
World Conflict and Security
Terrorism
Philosophy of War and Peace
Introductory Social Psychology
The Psychology of Prejudice
Social Movements, Protest and Change
Social Inequality
The Social Reality of Crime and Justice
Conflict Resolution and Restorative Justice
Community Organizing
Advocacy and Social Change: Theory and Practice
Faith-based Activism
Theologies of Nonviolence
Honors Theologies of Nonviolence
Focal Area Two: Justice, Human Rights and Reconciliation
Empathy, Crime and Justice
Educational Inquiry 1: Critical Perspectives on Education
Postcolonial Literatures
Francophone Studies in Human Rights
Modern South Africa
Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Contemporary Ethical Problems
Business Ethics
The Politics of Civil Rights and Liberties
International Law
International Organizations
Human Security
Politics of Migration
The Politics of Human Rights
Immigrants and their Communities
Focal Area Three: Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice and Sustainability
Politics of U.S. Health Care
Comparative Health Politics and Policy
Introduction to the Global Economy
Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
Development Economics
Global Literatures
Sustainable Finance
Culture and Health
Veteran Health and Culture
Environmental History: Ecology and Society in the Modern World
Nursing and Health in the Jesuit Tradition
Philosophy of the Environment
Earth and Environmental Physics
Urban Public Policy
Environmental Politics and Policy
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
The Political Economy of Development
Environment and Society
Capitalism and Society
Global Aid and Humanitarianism
Theology and Economics
Honors Theology and Economics
Foundations of Ecological Ethics
Focal Area Four: Structural Violence and Positive Social Change
Race and Gender Issues in Mass Media
Domestic Violence in the United States
Race, Crime and Punishment
Family Violence and Public Intervention
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
African-American History
A History of Native America
Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
Comparative Twentieth-Century Genocides
Diversity in Organizations
Latin American Philosophy
Feminist Philosophy
Africana Philosophy
African-American Social Thought
Christianity and Sexuality in the U.S.
Sociology of Sex and Gender
Arabs and Muslims in Global Context
Spanish in the United States
Bridging the Racial Divide
Contemplation and Justice in a Violent World
Women and Theology Across Cultures
Total Credit Hours18

Notes:

  • Relevant upper-division, independent study and special topics courses may be counted toward the elective requirements of the major/minor upon review of the course syllabus and approval by the director of the Peace Studies program. Once the course is completed a course waiver form is required to be submitted. 

  • To find peace studies related internships, summer fellowships and events, visit www.marquette.edu/peacemaking/.

  • In cases where courses have prerequisites, Peace Studies minors should contact the director of the Peace Studies program.

Courses

INPS 2010. Introduction to Peace Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

An interdisciplinary, introductory seminar for students interested in Peace Studies. Students explore faith-based and secular theoretical and practical approaches to the concepts of peace and justice, through critical discussion of relevant texts and reflective writing.

INPS 3960. Research in Peace Studies. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Students engage in original research, intensive study and/or critical discussion under the close guidance of a professor who is generally an expert in the field. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

INPS 4997. Capstone Seminar in Peace Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

Senior seminar for students completing Peace Studies. Designed to bring interdisciplinary approaches to bear on questions of peace. Topics include the application of peace building skills, the creation of just systems, the protection of human rights, and effective models of development. Students explore paths to peace through text-based inquiry, multidisciplinary theoretical analysis, and integration of prior course work. Experiential learning opportunities and internships are offered. Prereq: Sr. stndg. and INPS major or minor.