Chairperson: Danielle K. Nussberger, Ph.D.
Department of Theology website

Mission

The Department of Theology concentrates on theological studies as distinguished from a purely empirical study of religion and from professional training for the ministry. Theology at Marquette explores faith and what it has to say about the fundamental purpose and meaning of all things, including our own existence. It seeks the deeper unity underlying all reality, its common origin and ultimate purpose.

The Department of Theology aims to help educate undergraduates by bringing them to an understanding of their respective faith commitments and traditions in harmony with their overall intellectual, critical and cultural development. The department also incorporates into Catholic theology an ecumenical and inter-religious dimension, that is, an openness to all faiths, which was made normative by the Second Vatican Council, and which is regarded by the department as an essential service to the Church and the world. Theological questions evoke distinctive responses from the various religious perspectives represented in contemporary society. The department respects the various faith traditions of its students and works for mutual understanding among different faiths.

Program Goals

Students are able to take courses in Scripture, the history of Christian thought, Christian doctrine and world religions. They explore the relationship between faith and justice in accordance with the recent General Congregations of the Society of Jesus.

In the undergraduate program students will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic categories of theological reflection: Biblical, historical, systematic and ethical.
  • Analyze texts for their theological content according to their particular literary genres and historical contexts.
  • Use effective theological methods of research and argumentation.

Theology Curriculum

The comprehensive educational goal of the theology curriculum is theological literacy at the level legitimately expected of graduates of a Catholic university. Through investigation of various theological sources, this intellectual formation habituates students to approaches, responses and critiques appropriate to the academic discipline of theology, which is “faith seeking understanding.” Three specific objectives guide the theology curriculum. Every course is designed, first, to increase the student’s awareness of the mystery and religious dimensions of human life, particularly as conveyed in the basic narrative outline of salvation history — which characterizes the Christian worldview — from creation to fulfillment in Jesus Christ.

This objective takes precedence in the first course, THEO 1001 Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things. This first-level course investigates the principle that God can be found in all things.  How are we to envision God and the virtuous life in light of the theological and scriptural understanding of the prophets, Jesus, and human existence from which that Catholic, Jesuit conviction springs? What differentiates a faith understanding from other academic, scientific, and secular ways of thinking and drawing conclusions? How are we to assess the merits of theological truth claims? How can the Ignatian imperative to see God in all things translate into an obligation to promote justice in the world?  What distinctive set of tools for advancing justice emerge from such an understanding? Upon completion of this course, students will be able to 1) express a conception of God and the virtuous life in terms of understandings of the prophets, Jesus, and human existence articulating in the Christian tradition, and in relation to at least one other religious or humanistic tradition; 2) distinguish theological ways of asking and answering questions from those of other disciplines, analyze theological arguments, and articulate some foundation for assessing the merits of theological truth claims; 3) describe how Christian theological convictions translate into an obligation to promote justice in the world and articulate a distinctive set of tools with which to do so.

While cultivating the student’s growing base of factual knowledge, courses go on to provide the student with training in theological understanding, primarily through the reading and interpreting of significant texts. Subsequent courses are designed to develop the skills required for such understanding, to investigate particular theological topics with discipline-specific methods, and to develop in students the critical habit of seeing into the depth-dimension of reality in light of religious faith and its historical effects on human societies. A wide variety of classes, all building on THEO 1001, develop these critical habits in the student. These offerings include interdisciplinary courses to investigate theological questions; courses that focus on a particular person, time period or topic; courses that examine the impact of religion on our daily lives and courses that explore non-Christian religious traditions. These courses aim to produce Jesuit university graduates who are able to discern the perennially significant in the complexity and conflicting values of modern life, “men and women for others,” intellectually prepared to “find God in all things.” Upper division courses aim in a special way to encourage students to become responsible citizens, drawn to the intellectual life, knowledgeable about their own religious traditions and appreciative of the religious beliefs and practices of others in the human community.

In all courses, theological issues are introduced and discussed with respect for others in keeping with the Declaration on Religious Liberty of the Second Vatican Council.

Major in Theology and Religion

The major in theology and religion consists of 33 credit hours, which includes a required introductory level course (3 credit hours), the capstone seminar in theology (3 credit hours), and nine additional theology courses to be chosen in consultation with the student's advisor (27 credit hours, 18 of which must be upper division - 3000 or 4000 level).

THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things (Required introductory level course)3
Nine courses to be chosen from the following (6 courses must be 3000 or 4000-level):27
Memory and the Making of the Old Testament
New Testament Overview
The Bible Through the Ages
Great Moments in Christian Theology
Prayer and Mystical Experience
Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius
Quests for God, Paths of Revelation
Evil, Horror and Theology
Christian Discipleship
Christian Faith in Cultural Contexts
Theologies of Nonviolence
Hebrew Scriptures/Old Testament Selected Books:
Economic Justice in the Biblical Tradition
A Faith Worth Dying For? Martyrs, Saints and Theology
New Testament Selected Books:
Miracles
Theology in the Writings of C. S. Lewis
Tolerance, Hatred and Dialogue
God, Sex, Violence
The Event and Meaning of Vatican II
Theology, Philosophy and Science
Theology and the Visual Arts
Christian-Muslim Dialogue
God at Work
Virtues and Vices
Bridging the Racial Divide
Introduction to Latin American Theology
Latin America and the Martyrs
Theology and Globalization
Theology and Global Health
Women and Theology Across Cultures
Theology and Economics
Theology Engaging Culture
Digging the Bible: Archeology and Biblical Studies
The Bible in the Jewish Community
Studies in Biblical Theology
Theology in the Early Church
History and Theology of the Christian East
Theology in the Reformation Era
Martin Luther
Studies in Historical Theology
The Question of God in a Secular Age
Theology of the Holy Spirit
Theology of the Church
Who is God and How Do We Know?
Christian Faith and Justice
Christian Theology in Global Contexts
Family, Church, and Society
Foundations of Ecological Ethics
Studies in Moral Theology
Christ and World Religions: Theology of Interreligious Dialogue
Survey of World Religions
Jewish Thought and Practice
Islam: Faith and Practice
Hinduism, Yoga, and Buddhism
Required Theology Capstone Seminar
THEO 4997Capstone Seminar3
Total Credit Hours33

Notes:

  • Depending on a student’s preparation and educational needs, other courses may be substituted by approval of the departmental adviser, who may also suggest cognate courses in other departments.
  • Students preparing for graduate studies in theology are encouraged to begin courses in a necessary classical (Greek/Hebrew/Latin) or modern (French/German) language.

Minor in Theology and Religion

The minor in theology and religion consists of six theology courses (18 credit hours); two of these courses may be lower-division, four courses must be upper-division.

Disciplinary Honors in Physics

Curricular Requirements

Seminar Series 13
Introduction to Honors in the Humanities
Developing a Humanities Honors Project and Writing a Research Proposal
Humanities Honors Project Seminar
One upper-division Theology course thematically paired by the student with:3
One upper-division course in another department3
THEO 4999HHonors Senior Thesis 23
Total Credit Hours12

Notes:

  • Two upper-level departmental courses, one in the student’s major and one that must be in another department are required. Each must be a 3-credit, graded course and must have the approval of the HiH director. These courses are normally taken during student’s junior year. The courses in the student’s major count toward total major credits and toward other major requirements where applicable. The course in another department does not count toward major requirements.
  • These two thematically paired courses are carefully chosen by the individual student to help them set a foundation for their independent research project.  Ideally these offer background, help the student develop new questions and allow for new perspectives on these questions.
  • Students may take these upper-level thematically paired courses concurrently or in different terms; they should have finished at least one before beginning their independent projects.  

Academic Standards

Students must have a 3.200 cumulative overall grade point average for entry into the Humanities Disciplinary Honors Program. Students must achieve a 3.200 cumulative grade point average in the above 12 credit hours required in order to graduate with Humanities Disciplinary Honors. Students who complete both Core Honors and Humanities Disciplinary Honors earn a Comprehensive Honors degree. Students must have a 3.200 cumulative GPA to graduate with this degree. Students admitted to Humanities Disciplinary Honors become part of the University Honors Program and are eligible for Honors research fellowships and Honors study-abroad scholarships. If an Honors student drops below a 3.200 in any given term during the junior year or any subsequent year, the student receives a letter of warning from the director. If a student drops below a 3.200 cumulative GPA, they are placed on University Honors Program academic probation; if they do not achieve a 3.200 cumulative GPA by the end of the following term, they are removed from the program. Students must earn a grade of C or better in all courses required for Humanities Disciplinary Honors and the Comprehensive Honors degree.

Additional Requirements:

  • The student must submit a written application to the program after HOPR 2954H but before HOPR 3954H that includes a description of the project they would like to pursue, a brief list of potential faculty mentors and another brief list of possible course pairings with explanations of how each might further develop the research plan. This application is be read by both the director and the appropriate disciplinary committee member.
  • A research proposal is produced in HOPR 3954H, for the THEO 4999H thesis project that contains a reflection on the paired courses and how they have shaped the project--including the research questions, methodology and literature review. The student also has a mentor in place for the THEO 4999H by the end of HOPR 3954H.
  • The final THEO 4999H thesis project is graded by the disciplinary faculty mentor, but is also assessed by the appropriate HiH board member (eg: a thesis in History would be graded by the thesis director and then assessed by the History HiH board member on a S/U basis).
  • Presentation is an important component of research and as such students are required to present their work either at the end of the HOPR 4954H term or the following term. Ideally, the student presents their work at the Marquette University Undergraduate Humanities Conference if it is held in the spring term following the HOPR 4954H.

Eligibility

Humanities Disciplinary Honors is designed to be completed during students’ junior and senior years. Sophomores interested in pursuing Humanities Disciplinary Honors should enroll in HOPR 2954H during their sophomore year. Sophomores are eligible to apply to the program near the end of the spring term as long as they meet the 3.200 minimum cumulative GPA requirement.  

Application

Students are encouraged to apply following successful completion of HOPR 2954H, but applications are also accepted in the fall term of the junior year.  Students apply for admission to the Honors in the Humanities director. Application materials may be obtained by contacting kristen.foster@marquette.edu.

Theology-International Courses

THEOI 2500. Theologies of Nonviolence-International. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the concepts of peace and nonviolence in the history of Catholicism, other Christian churches and world religions. Examines the ideas and practices found in the Hebrew scriptures, the New Testament, Gandhi and Hinduism and Buddhism. Covers topics such as just war, pacifism, nonviolent resistance and their spiritual foundations. Taught in an international setting by Marquette professors and where students earn Marquette credit. Study Abroad expenses apply. Prereq: THEO 1001 and cons. of the Office of International Education.

THEOI 3100. A Faith Worth Dying For? Martyrs, Saints and Theology-International. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces the world of martyrs and saints and their specific theological context. Raises the questions of religion and violence, religious tolerance and of personal commitment/identity. More than one time period or geographic area will be covered. Taught either from a Jewish, Christian or World Religions-Perspective in an international setting by Marquette professors and where students earn Marquette credit. Study Abroad expenses apply. Prereq: THEO 100, Soph. stndg. and cons. of the Office of International Education.

Theology Courses

THEO 1001. Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things. 3 cr. hrs.

Investigates the principle that God can be found in all things. How are we to envision God and the virtuous life in light of the theological and scriptural understandings of the prophets, Jesus and human existence from which that Catholic, Jesuit conviction springs? What differentiates a faith understanding from other academic, scientific and secular ways of thinking and drawing conclusions? How are we to assess the merits of theological truth claims? How can the Ignatian imperative to see God in all things translate into an obligation to promote justice in the world? What distinctive set of tools for advancing justice emerge from such an understanding?.

THEO 1001H. Honors Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things. 3 cr. hrs.

Investigates the principle that God can be found in all things. How are we to envision God and the virtuous life in light of the theological and scriptural understandings of the prophets, Jesus and human existence from which that Catholic, Jesuit conviction springs? What differentiates a faith understanding from other academic, scientific and secular ways of thinking and drawing conclusions? How are we to assess the merits of theological truth claims? How can the Ignatian imperative to see God in all things translate into an obligation to promote justice in the world? What distinctive set of tools for advancing justice emerge from such an understanding? As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2000. Memory and the Making of the Old Testament. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the origins of the Old Testament as a function of cultural memory and how the authors of the earliest biblical texts recalled pivotal events and personalities of their people's past in view of their present realities. Also examines how the authors interpreted those realities in view of their inscribed memories and how collective cognition contributed to the formation of a sacred library foundation to the Jewish and Christian religions. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2000H. Honors Hebrew Scriptures: Old Testament Overview. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the contents of the Hebrew Bible, its historical contexts and religious ideas. Includes analysis of selected texts from representative sections of the Old Testament and discussion of their various theological visions of God, the human person and the people of God in interrelationship. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2100. New Testament Overview. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the contents of the New Testament, its historical contexts and religious ideas. Includes analysis of selected texts from representative sections of the New Testament and discussion of their various theological visions of God, the human person and the people of God in interrelationship. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2100H. Honors New Testament Overview. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the contents of the New Testament, its historical contexts and religious ideas. Includes analysis of selected texts from representative sections of the New Testament and discussion of their various theological visions of God, the human person and the people of God in interrelationship. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2200. The Bible Through the Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Understandings and uses of the Bible in the history of Christianity. Revelation, Faith, Tradition, Scripture. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2200H. Honors The Bible Through the Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Understandings and uses of the Bible in the history of Christianity. Revelation, Faith, Tradition, Scripture. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2210. Great Moments in Christian Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Trinity, Incarnation and Salvation in the history of Christian thought over a substantial portion of its range. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2210H. Honors Great Moments in Christian Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Trinity, Incarnation and Salvation in the history of Christian thought over a substantial portion of its range. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2240. Prayer and Mystical Experience. 3 cr. hrs.

The study of prayer and mystical experience across a variety of historical and cultural contexts. Particular attention paid to the foundational writings of the patristic period, the later Byzantine period, and the medieval West, concluding with a study of selected writings from the post-Reformation period reflecting Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox approaches to prayer and mystical experience. Addresses questions concerning the definition and character of mystical experience, the interrelation of mystical and dogmatic theology, and the relative character and significance of mystical experience in the principal Christian traditions. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2250. Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius with an eye to discovering the spirituality found therein. Begins with the life of St. Ignatius of Loyola and ends with the famous Jesuit prayer, the Suscipe. Focuses on the introductory notes and the four weeks of the Spiritual Exercises and the special graces of each week. Topics found in the Spiritual Exercises include: the examen, finding God in all things, various methods of prayer and the discernment of spirits. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2250H. Honors Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius with an eye to discovering the spirituality found therein. Begins with the life of St. Ignatius of Loyola and ends with the famous Jesuit prayer, the Suscipe. Focuses on the introductory notes and the four weeks of the Spiritual Exercises and the special graces of each week. Topics found in the Spiritual Exercises include: the examen, finding God in all things, various methods of prayer and the discernment of spirits. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2300. Quests for God, Paths of Revelation. 3 cr. hrs.

The quest for God in human and specifically religious experiences with a focus on Christian belief in God. Grounds for belief; revelation; the nature of God's relationship to the world including issues relevant to modern culture and science. The historical precedents and context for these issues. The dialogue with other religious and atheistic conceptions of ultimate reality. Implications of a community's understanding of God for its way of life. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2300H. Honors Quests for God, Paths of Revelation. 3 cr. hrs.

The quest for God in human and specifically religious experiences with a focus on Christian belief in God. Grounds for belief; revelation; the nature of God's relationship to the world including issues relevant to modern culture and science. The historical precedents and context for these issues. The dialogue with other religious and atheistic conceptions of ultimate reality. Implications of a community's understanding of God for its way of life. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2310. Explorations in Christian Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of the meaning and interconnections of some of the central themes in Christian theology (e.g. Jesus Christ, Trinity, Church, Sacraments, Sin and Grace, Revelation). The historical and communal context for understanding these. Implications of these for understanding what it means to be human. Specific topics to be included in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2310H. Honors Explorations in Christian Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of the meaning and interconnections of some of the central themes in Christian theology (e.g. Jesus Christ, Trinity, Church, Sacraments, Sin and Grace, Revelation). The historical and communal context for understanding these. Implications of these for understanding what it means to be human. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Specific topics to be included in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2330. Evil, Horror and Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Good and evil as contrasting and conflicting forces in human life, society, culture and imagination. Theological articulations of the nature of good and the sources of evil, reflected in literary genre of horror. The significance of good and evil for human self-understanding and for human understanding of God. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2400. Christian Discipleship. 3 cr. hrs.

The Christian identity of God as a God of Love and Justice. The divine and personal call to the human person to a life of holiness, faith, the virtues, especially justice; the preferential option for the poor; the role of community in the moral and spiritual life of individuals and Christian communities as agents for social change. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2400H. Honors Christian Discipleship. 3 cr. hrs.

The Christian identity of God as a God of Love and Justice. The divine and personal call to the human person to a life of holiness, faith, the virtues, especially justice; the preferential option for the poor; the role of community in the moral and spiritual life of individuals and Christian communities as agents for social change. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2410. Christian Faith in Cultural Contexts. 3 cr. hrs.

Religious experience and beliefs concerning God, human beings, and faith community as apprehended within a particular historically and culturally situated community or communities (e.g. African-American, Hispanic, Asian, or European). Specific topics to be included in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2410H. Honors Christian Faith in Cultural Contexts. 3 cr. hrs.

Religious experience and beliefs concerning God, human beings, and faith community as apprehended within a particular historically and culturally situated community or communities (e.g. African-American, Hispanic, Asian, or European). As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Specific topics to be included in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 2500. Theologies of Nonviolence. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the concepts of peace and nonviolence in the history of Catholicism, other Christian churches and world religions. Examines the ideas and practices found in the Hebrew scriptures, the New Testament, Gandhi and Hinduism and Buddhism. Covers topics such as just war, pacifism, nonviolent resistance and their spiritual foundations. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 2500H. Honors Theologies of Nonviolence. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the concepts of peace and nonviolence in the history of Catholicism, other Christian churches and world religions. Examines the ideas and practices found in the Hebrew scriptures, the New Testament, Gandhi and Hinduism and Buddhism. Covers topics such as just war, pacifism, nonviolent resistance and their spiritual foundations. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 3010. Hebrew Scriptures/Old Testament Selected Books:. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of a portion of the Old Testament in depth and with a focus on critical reading skills, as well as central theological questions (God, individual, community). Specific textual content varies by term, with possible focus on the Pentateuch, Prophets, and the other Writings. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3010H. Honors Hebrew Scriptures/Old Testament Selected Books. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of a portion of the Old Testament in depth and with a focus on critical reading skills, as well as central theological questions (God, individual, community). As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Specific textual content varies by term, with possible focus on the Pentateuch, Prophets, and the other Writings. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Soph. stndg. and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 3020. Economic Justice in the Biblical Tradition. 3 cr. hrs.

Biblical evidence about the material needs of he people of ancient Israel/Judah. Biblical critiques of the misuses of material resources as acts of injustice. Calls to economic justice and care for the poor in the Old Testament, particularly in the prophetic and wisdom books, as well as the New Testament Gospels. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 3100. A Faith Worth Dying For? Martyrs, Saints and Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces the world of martyrs and saints and their specific theological context. Raises the questions of religion and violence, religious tolerance and of personal commitment/identity. More than one time period or geographic area will be covered. Taught either from a Jewish, Christian or World Religions-Perspective. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3100H. Honors A Faith Worth Dying For? Martyrs, Saints, and Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces the world of martyrs and saints and their specific theological context. Raises the questions of religion and violence, religious tolerance and of personal commitment/identity. More than one time period or geographic area will be covered. Taught either from a Jewish, Christian or World Religions-Perspective. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Soph. stndg. and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 3110. New Testament Selected Books:. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of a portion of the New Testament in depth and with a focus on critical reading skills, as well as central theological questions (God, individual, church). Specific textual content varies by term, with possible focus on the synoptic gospels, the Johannine literature, or the Pauline letters. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3110H. Honors New Testament Selected Books. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of a portion of the New Testament in depth and with a focus on critical reading skills, as well as central theological questions (God, individual, church). Specific textual content varies by term, with possible focus on the synoptic gospels, the Johannine literature, or the Pauline letters. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Soph. stndg. and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 3130. Miracles. 3 cr. hrs.

An exploration of the reasons for the suppression of the miraculous in Western culture. Biblical representations of miracles with a special emphasis on the miracles of Jesus as a first step toward recovering a theology of wonder and healing. An examination of the viability of belief in miracles today and the use and misuse of miracles in contemporary theology, literature and film. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 3230. Theology in the Writings of C. S. Lewis. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the life and work of C. S. Lewis which focuses on theological themes in select writings of C. S. Lewis, including his understanding of God, the human person, and the life of faith as a moral challenge. The readings also bring to light Lewis's notion of "the Tao," by which he brought Christianity into dialogue with other religions and with emerging western secularism. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3230H. Honors Theology in the Writings of C.S. Lewis. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the life and work of C. S. Lewis which focuses on theological themes in select writings of C. S. Lewis, including his understanding of God, the human person, and the life of faith as a moral challenge. The readings also bring to light Lewis's notion of "the Tao," by which he brought Christianity into dialogue with other religions and with emerging western secularism. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Soph. stndg. and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 3240. Tolerance, Hatred and Dialogue. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines how individuals find freedom in religious communities and how communities deal with dissent within their communities, and thus with tolerance. Addresses political, economic, racist, colonialist and other perspectives toward dissent, inquiring what religious and political obstacles to tolerance exist in communities and how they learned to deescalate tensions and overcome intolerance. Includes not only different Christian communities but also the tensions between different religions (Judaism and Islam) and the relationship to atheism. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3250. Contemplation and Justice in a Violent World. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to the practice of theology as a way of knowing and engaging our world by exploring techniques and strategies to cultivate a transformed mode of perception that stirs us into action. By interweaving theory (René Girard, James Alison, Shawn Copeland, James Cone, Denise Levertov) and practice (silent contemplation), we consider how the Christian theological tradition provides resources needed to address issues of social and racial inequality. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 3270. God, Sex, Violence. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of God, sex and violence through the claim of mimetic theory that human desire is imitative. Application of this theory to analyze and creatively reimagine major features of Christian faith and to perceive the world differently by utilizing the thought of Rene Girard and James Alison. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3320. The Event and Meaning of Vatican II. 3 cr. hrs.

Studies the reasons for which this ecumenical council was called, the historical context in which it was celebrated from 1962 until 1965 and the meaning of this council's documents for Christian conceptions of God, the human community, the Church, the world, and the interaction of all of these. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3320H. Honors The Event and the Meaning of Vatican II. 3 cr. hrs.

Studies the reasons for which this ecumenical council was called, the historical context in which it was celebrated from 1962 until 1965 and the meaning of this council's documents for Christian conceptions of God, the human community, the Church, the world, and the interaction of all of these. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Soph. stndg. and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 3330. Theology, Philosophy and Science. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores Bernard Lonergan’s approach to the interdisciplinary collaboration between theology, on the one hand, and philosophy, natural science and human science on the other. Attention given to the integration of knowledge made possible by his work. Specific applications are made to physics, depth psychology, cultural and social science, economics and other issues not covered by the other disciplines. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3340. Theology and the Visual Arts. 3 cr. hrs.

Builds on THEO 1001 by focusing on theology illustrated in visual art, mostly in the form of paintings and prints, studying how they can be read on different levels by identifying the subject matter and the theological message the artist is trying to convey. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3350. Christian-Muslim Dialogue. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines a variety of Christian and Muslim experiences within the context of their engagement with each other. Explores of select individual contributions of Muslim and Christian scholars at formal dialogues as well as declarations, resolutions, publications and other jointly produced documents that resulted from these dialogues. Also examines the official teachings of these religions on their view of a religious "other" as well as the guidelines for inter-religious dialogue developed jointly by members of different faiths. Includes an experiential component: required site-visit to a place of worship as well as a series of "dialogue dinners". Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 3360. God at Work. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of human labor in Christian thought and practice answering such questions as: Why do we work and what is the significance of our labor? Why is creativity an integral part of contemporary work. Is work more than a career? How does work express individuality as it creates community? What is the role of God or spirituality in the many workplaces of our lives? Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 3410. Virtues and Vices. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the development of Christian and specifically Catholic ethics since the conclusion of the Second Vatican Council in 1965. Themes addressed include: the acquisition of knowledge, making meaning, the role of language, communal memory, and the influence of technology in relation to the vocation of the human person in addition to an investigation of distinct theories regarding the formation of moral judgments and responsibility, the cultivation of virtue, Catholic social teaching, and bioethics. Attention given to theology’s approach to a range of issues treated differently by other disciplines. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3420. Bridging the Racial Divide. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of racism, ethnic tension, and theology from the perspective of "white privilege" and African American experience in American Christianity. Reflects on the intersection of these areas to discover, on the other hand, to discern how specific theological notions contribute positively or negatively to our understanding of race, ethnic tension and social justice. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3420H. Honors Bridging the Racial Divide. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of racism, ethnic tension, and theology from the perspective of "white privilege" and African American experience in American Christianity. Reflects on the intersection of these areas to discover, on the other hand, to discern how specific theological notions contribute positively or negatively to our understanding of race, ethnic tension and social justice. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Soph. stndg. and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 3430. Introduction to Latin American Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to Latin American theology through a study of theological themes such as Christology, the problem of suffering, Christian ecology, martyrdom etc. from the particular perspective of Latin America and the writings of various Latin American theologians chosen to present a particular focus within Latin American theology: Gutiérrez and the problem of suffering, Sobrino and the principle of mercy, Boff and The Good of Creation, Martyrdom in Latin America, etc. Prereq: THEO and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3440. Latin America and the Martyrs. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores classical systematic or dogmatic themes in Christian Theology such as Christology, ecclesiology, the problem of suffering, etc., from the perspective of the liberating theology of Latin America. Presentation of contextual theology illustrated by a study of the major authors of Latin American theology from their unique perspectives, e.g., the pastoral liberation theology of Gustavo Gutiérrez and the Christology of Jon Sobrino. Includes study of the martyrs of El Salvador. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3450. Theology and Globalization. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the moral and social justice issues presented by the phenomenon of globalization understood as the economic, political and cultural interdependence of nations and persons worldwide, with attention to the widening gap between the rich and the poor, preference of material goods over human beings manifest in exploitation and depersonalization of migrant workers, environmental degradation and increasing global insecurity. Contribution of Christian theological anthropology and Christian social teaching to assess the dynamics of globalization and to achieve the integral development of human life in its vital, social, cultural, personal and religious dimensions. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3460. Theology and Global Health. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the historical and communal contexts and the theological ethics of challenges to global health such as health inequalities, poverty, social determinants of health, HIV/Aids and epidemic outbreaks. In dialogue with liberation theology “from below,” i.e., from the perspective of those who are poor, a study of central themes in Christian theology (e.g. Jesus Christ, Trinity, Church, Sacraments, Sin and Grace, Revelation), and their contribution to the promotion of global health. Health considered as a human right needed for human flourishing. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3470. Women and Theology Across Cultures. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores contemporary Christian theology through the lens of women's experiences from around the world (e.g., Scripture, theological anthropology, spirituality, social justice issues, etc.). Readings include texts written by “First World” (including the voices of African-American, Asian-American, and Latina women) and “Third World” women theologians. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3530. Theology and Economics. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides skills for theological evaluation of economic theories and practices, particularly as they bear on the rise and ascendancy of the global market. Divided into three sections: 1) A history of economic thought traced from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes, with particular attention to their moral theory, underlying philosophy and its relationship to theology; 2) The tradition of economic thought within Christian theology, as a traced drawing on Scripture, tradition and Catholic social teaching; and 3) Contemporary theologians will be examined, who relate the Christian tradition to various economic theories and practices. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Soph. stndg.

THEO 3530H. Honors Theology and Economics. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides skills for theological evaluation of economic theories and practices, particularly as they bear on the rise and ascendancy of the global market. Divided into three sections: 1) A history of economic thought traced from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes, with particular attention to their moral theory, underlying philosophy and its relationship to theology; 2) The tradition of economic thought within Christian theology, as a traced drawing on Scripture, tradition and Catholic social teaching; and 3) Contemporary theologians will be examined, who relate the Christian tradition to various economic theories and practices. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Soph. stndg. and admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

THEO 3600. Theology Engaging Culture. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of how the appropriation of Christian doctrine across cultures gives rise to diverse Christian theologies, particularly between the global south and the global north. How the law of the cross seeks through Christian charity to engage other cultures, social systems and theologies to create a just social system and inclusive theologies open to religious and socio-cultural pluralism. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 3986. Internship in Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Practical learning to provide an intentional experience of pastoral service and leadership in a ministry-related setting. Students will apply the theology, concepts, and skills learned in the classroom by integrating study with pastoral praxis at an approved site and developing competencies in the areas of pastoral theology and ministry. Requires a commitment of a minimum of 10 hours per week at an approved site during the academic term and attendance at a group seminar. Students must have declared a major or a minor in Theology, completed at least 3 courses (9 cr. hrs.) in Theology and have a minimum 3.000 cum. GPA to be eligible. The student must complete an application for the internship. Selection is based on academic credentials, extracurricular experience, and a written essay. May be taken only once. Grade is determined by seminar participation, written work, evaluation of work performance at the student's site, and a final assignment. S/U grade assessment. Limited enrollment. Prereq: Jr. stndg., and consent of instructor.

THEO 4000. Digging the Bible: Archeology and Biblical Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

An exploration of the uses and abuses of archeology relative to the field of biblical studies. Case studies in a historical approach to the intersection of archeology and biblical theology. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4000H. Honors Digging the Bible: Archeology and Biblical Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

An exploration of the uses and abuses of archeology relative to the field of biblical studies. Case studies in a historical approach to the intersection of archeology and biblical theology. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4015. Intensive Hellenistic Greek. 3 cr. hrs.

An introduction to the Greek of the Hellenistic era, including the New Testament. Emphasis on grammar, syntax, vocabulary acquisition and historical context and theology. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4020. The Bible in the Jewish Community. 3 cr. hrs.

The uses of the Bible in Jewish life and practice, in synagogue and in private use. Haggadah and Halakah. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4030. Women in the Bible. 3 cr. hrs.

Status and roles of women in selected biblical texts. Social and historical background with emphasis on narrative technique and theological themes. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4030H. Honors Women in the Bible. 3 cr. hrs.

Status and roles of women in selected biblical texts. Social and historical background with emphasis on narrative technique and theological themes. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4130. Religion and American Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey the historical impact of religious belief and institutions on the intellectual, cultural and public life of the United States. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4190. Studies in Biblical Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant topics in Old Testament, Intertestamental or New Testament literature. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4190H. Honors Studies in Biblical Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant topics in Old Testament, Intertestamental or New Testament literature. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4200. Theology in the Early Church. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the era of the Church Fathers. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4200H. Honors Theology in the Early Church. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the era of the Church Fathers. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4210. History and Theology of the Christian East. 3 cr. hrs.

The Christian East from its origins, through the conversion of Constantine, to the present-day Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Churches. Particular attention to the distinctive theological emphases of the East, as well as to the developments leading to the break in communion between Catholic (and Protestant) West and Orthodox East. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4220. St. Augustine: The Man and the Theologian. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of Augustine's life, writings and thought, with special attention to the Confessions, to his theology of the church and the sacraments, and to his teaching on grace and predestination, against the background of his early philosophical writings. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4220H. Honors St. Augustine: The Man and the Theologian. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of Augustine's life, writings and thought, with special attention to the Confessions, to his theology of the church and the sacraments, and to his teaching on grace and predestination, against the background of his early philosophical writings. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4230. Theology in the Middle Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the Middle Ages, from the Carolingians to the fourteenth century. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4230H. Honors Theology in the Middle Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the Middle Ages, from the Carolingians to the fourteenth century. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4240. Theology in the Reformation Era. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the late Middle Ages and early Reformation. Current ecumenical issues also addressed. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4240H. Honors Theology in the Reformation Era. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the late Middle Ages and early Reformation. Current ecumenical issues also addressed. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4250. Martin Luther. 3 cr. hrs.

The thought and world of Luther, with emphasis on Luther in his Catholic context; Luther and the Bible, Augustine, the Radicals, the Pope; Luther's theology of faith and freedom; contextual, theological and ethical. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4260. Theology in America. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments from Puritanism to the present. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4270. The Many Faces of U.S. Catholicism. 3 cr. hrs.

Investigates the development of diverse manifestations of U.S. Catholic life and thought. Explores how historical and contemporary experiences, including slavery, migration, sexism and other forms of historical exclusion, contribute to the shaping of theologies and practices that are uniquely American and distinctly Catholic. Prereq: THEO 1001.

THEO 4290. Studies in Historical Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant figures and themes in the history of religious thought, examined in their historical context and contemporary significance. Topics and periods vary. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4300. The Question of God in a Secular Age. 3 cr. hrs.

Origins and varieties of contemporary atheism. The existence of God and Christian theistic interpretations. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4300H. Honors The Question of God in a Secular Age. 3 cr. hrs.

Origins and varieties of contemporary atheism. The existence of God and Christian theistic interpretations. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4310. Theology of the Holy Spirit. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the distinct mission and person of the Holy Spirit in the Trinitarian work of human salvation. Analysis of biblical, patristic, and conciliar sources; attention to modern theology and the role of experience. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4320. Jesus the Christ. 3 cr. hrs.

The identity of Jesus Christ and the nature of Christian salvation as attested to in the New Testament and Christian tradition. Historical Jesus and diversity of christologies in the New Testament. Humanity and divinity of Christ. The saving significance of Christ's life, death and resurrection. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4330. Theology of the Church. 3 cr. hrs.

The Church in light of the documents, events, and charism of Vatican II. Contemporary understandings of the Church and its mission in the modern world. Special attention to post-conciliar "communion ecclesiology" and the relation of the local to the universal Church. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4330H. Honors Theology of the Church. 3 cr. hrs.

The Church in light of the documents, events, and charism of Vatican II. Contemporary understandings of the Church and its mission in the modern world. Special attention to post-conciliar "communion ecclesiology" and the relation of the local to the universal Church. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4340. Sacraments and Christian Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological overview of the major sacramental enactments of the church's life in Christ. The witness of Scripture and Tradition, including the liturgy itself. Ethical and ecumenical dimensions. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4340H. Honors Sacraments and Christian Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological overview of the major sacramental enactments of the church's life in Christ. The witness of Scripture and Tradition, including the liturgy itself. Ethical and ecumenical dimensions. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4350. The Eucharist. 3 cr. hrs.

Biblical origins and historical evolution of the Eucharist in light of contemporary theology and ritual theory, with special focus on the Roman Rite Catholic post-Vatican II celebration. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4370. Protestant Thought and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Major perspectives within the broad spectrum of Protestantism. Examination of the thought of several Protestant theologians. A survey of the unity and diversity of several Protestant denominations and their respective forms of worship. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4380. Who is God and How Do We Know?. 3 cr. hrs.

Following an examination of how we know anything, God is studied through three sources of knowing: biblical revelation and doctrinal tradition, natural knowledge of God and the experience of grace. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4390. Studies in Systematic Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant movements and/or major figures in contemporary systematic theology. Their historical antecedents and cultural context. Specific topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4400. Christian Faith and Justice. 3 cr. hrs.

Classic and recent Christian understandings of justice as interpersonal and societal right-relations. Justice as constitutive aspect of the Gospel; love and justice; Christian responsibility in the face of injustice. Further issues, e.g. sexual and gender ethics, political and economic issues. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4400H. Honors Christian Faith and Justice. 3 cr. hrs.

Classic and recent Christian understandings of justice as interpersonal and societal right-relations. Justice as constitutive aspect of the Gospel; love and justice; Christian responsibility in the face of injustice. Further issues, e.g. sexual and gender ethics, political and economic issues. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4405. Christian Theology in Global Contexts. 3 cr. hrs.

The reception of the Christian gospel in diverse cultures throughout the world. The challenge of inculturation and the requirements of the unity of Christian faith. The meaning of mission and evangelization outside the West. The encounter with indigenous religions. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4405H. Honors Christian Theology in Global Contexts. 3 cr. hrs.

The reception of the Christian gospel in diverse cultures throughout the world. The challenge of inculturation and the requirements of the unity of Christian faith. The meaning of mission and evangelization outside the West. The encounter with indigenous religions. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4410. Family, Church, and Society. 3 cr. hrs.

The interaction of family, church, and society. Contemporary family patterns, their strengths and stresses; the teachings, reflection, and pastoral responses of the Church concerning marriage and family. Ecclesial and societal implications of family as "domestic church." Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4430. Religion and Science. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological analysis of the historical relationship between religion and the natural sciences; exploration of models for relating the two disciplines today; reflection on the theological implications of contemporary scientific discoveries and theories. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4430H. Honors Religion and Science. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological analysis of the historical relationship between religion and the natural sciences; exploration of models for relating the two disciplines today; reflection on the theological implications of contemporary scientific discoveries and theories. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: THEO 1001 or THEO 1001H; Jr. stndg.; admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.

THEO 4440. Foundations of Ecological Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of religious foundations for ecological ethics, with a focus on the Catholic tradition and social teachings; application to contemporary ecological problems. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4450. Medical Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Health care practices under moral assessment from within the Christian tradition. Controversial topics facing medicine (issues of the beginning and end of life, assisted reproduction, etc.) as related to Christian moral principles. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4460. Religion, Science and Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Recognition of the distinctiveness of theology and the natural sciences, discernment of how these disciplines can be constructively interfaced to address issues at their boundaries, logical reasoning from scientifically-informed, faith-based perspectives to moral behavior applied to specific issues, and demonstration of ability in writing to interrelate religion, science and ethics cogently and persuasively. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4490. Studies in Moral Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Selected issues in contemporary moral life; selected themes from classical and contemporary writings in moral theology and Christian ethics. Topics vary, as specified in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4500. Christ and World Religions: Theology of Interreligious Dialogue. 3 cr. hrs.

Global pluralism of religions considered from perspectives of Christian faith. Methods and case studies of theological dialogue with particular religious traditions, e.g. Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4510. Survey of World Religions. 3 cr. hrs.

An overview of the major religious traditions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, religions of China and Japan, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4520. Jewish Thought and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Meaning of Jewish history. Philosophical and social understanding of the Jewish experience. Ruling ideas, myths, symbols, and rites. Partially funded by the Jewish Chautauqua Society. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4530. Islam: Faith and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Major trends of Islamic religious thought, practice, and worship. Readings from the Qur'an and other Islamic writings. Historical approach. Current issues and developments. Islam in the West. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4540. Hinduism, Yoga, and Buddhism. 3 cr. hrs.

Religious experience, cultic act, religious organization, theological formulation, as illustrated by two religions of India, Hinduism and Buddhism. Yoga as spiritual discipline. Historical approach. Readings from sacred writings. Prereq: THEO 1001 and Jr. stndg.

THEO 4995. Independent Study in Theology. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Independent study in Theology. Prereq: THEO 1001, Jr. stndg. and cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 4997. Capstone Seminar. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of a theological topic involving issues of theological method and interrelatedness of the subdisciplines of biblical, historical, systematic and moral theology. Colloquium paper demonstrating critical analysis in a specific field. Prereq: Sr. stndg., THEO 1001, one second-level theology course, and cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 4999H. Honors Senior Thesis. 3 cr. hrs.

Introductory thesis guidance for approved students under the direction of a departmental adviser. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Theology Disciplinary Honors Program.