Chairperson: Leah Flack, Ph.D.
Department of English website

In the Department of English, storytelling is our passion. We are a community of creative thinkers who love to read and learn from great stories and to add our own voices and narratives to existing traditions. Our faculty have expertise in British, American, and global Anglophone literature and culture, creative writing, professional writing, rhetoric and composition and linguistics.

The English major trains students to think expansively in a way that values language, form, history, identity and human dignity; to solve problems logically and creatively; and to adapt to changing conditions. Our graduates enter the world as rigorous thinkers and powerful storytellers prepared for the opportunities and challenges of the twenty-first century.

An English major has always been and continues to be a versatile, recognizable asset to graduate, law, and medical school admissions committees as well as employers in the public, private and non-profit sectors. An English major is not only a great choice for a primary major—current English majors prove the English pairs well with every other academic program at Marquette to help students to amplify their creativity, critical thinking and expression.

Concentrations

The major in English offers students three concentrations: Language Arts (for future teachers), Literature, and Writing-Intensive

Language Arts. The Language Arts concentration is designed for students who are also majoring in Education in the College of Education. The requirements of the Language Arts concentration are aligned with Wisconsin DPI standards. Language Arts students have access to courses on pedagogy as well as courses that enable them to design independent pedagogical projects to prepare them to excel in their teaching careers. 33 credit hours.

Literature. The Literature concentration emphasizes reading, discussing, and writing in multiple modes and genres about compelling literature and culture across historical, national and social traditions. Literature students develop critical thinking skills, an expansive ethical imagination and authentic writing and speaking skills that will help them to excel as they pursue their personal and professional goals. 30 credit hours.

Writing-Intensive. This Writing-Intensive concentration emphasizes building a deep understanding of purpose, genre, medium, and audience through learning about the writing processes that best serve them. Writing students become self-aware, flexible, empowered writers and communicators as they excel in the creative, research and professional contexts that will serve their personal and professional goals. 36 credit hours.

English

The major has three concentrations:

Writing-Intensive. This Writing-Intensive concentration emphasizes building a deep awareness of purpose, genre, medium, and audience so that  students become self-aware, empowered writers and communicators ready to excel in the creative, research, and professional contexts that will serve their personal and professional goals. 36-37 cr. hrs.

Literature. The Literature concentration emphasizes reading compelling literature across historical, national, and social traditions and developing critical thinking, creativity, a sense of ethical imagination, and authentic writing and speaking skills that will help them to excel as they pursue their personal and professional goals. 30 cr. hrs.

Language Arts. The Language Arts concentration is for students also majoring in Education. It emphasizes developing skills across all areas in English: literature, writing, and language. These requirements are aligned with Wisconsin DPI standards in consultation with the College of Education. Language Arts students have access to courses on pedagogy as well as courses that enable them to design independent pedagogical projects to prepare them to excel in their teaching careers. 33 cr. hrs.

Requirements common to all concentrations include ENGL 3000 Introduction to Literary Studiesand three literature courses demonstrating historical breadth (12 cr. hrs.). Students pursuing the Literature and Writing-Intensive concentrations must complete a capstone experience course (3 cr. hrs.). Students pursuing the Language Arts concentration fulfill the capstone experience requirement through student teaching. 

One 2000-level course may be used to fulfill an elective requirement. No course may be used to fulfill more than one program requirement.

Common Major Requirements

ENGL 3000Introduction to Literary Studies3
Pre-1700 Literature - Choose one of the following:3
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Honors Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Studies in Genre 1
What Is a Book? 1
The Epic 1
1700-1900 Literature - Choose one of the following:3
Introduction to Gothic Fiction 2
Jane Austen
Disability and Literature 2
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America 3
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
British Literature of the Long 18th Century
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837
Romanticism and Nature
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
Moby-Dick
Children's Literature 2
Law and Literature 2
Post-1900 Literature - Choose one of the following:3
Drama 4
Modern Irish Literature
Contemporary Irish Literature
Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction
Film Studies
The Art of War 4
Medicine and Literature
Literature and Place 4
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory 4
Global Hip Hop
The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
Feminist Rhetorics 5
The Rhetoric of Black Protest 5
British Literature since 1900
Modernism
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
British Literature of the Postmodernist Period
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors 4
J. R. R. Tolkien
Text in Context 4
James Joyce's Ulysses
Toni Morrison
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies 4
Fiction 4
Creative Nonfiction 4
Poetry 4
Words to Worlds 4
Digital Literacies
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures 4
Studies in Literature and Culture 4
Gender, Sexuality, Literature 4
Women Writers 4
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Global Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures 4
Postcolonial Literatures
Global Literatures 4
Topics in Literature 4
Independent Study in English
Senior Thesis
Honors Senior Thesis
Total Credit Hours:12

Writing Intensive Concentration

ENGL 3210Writing Practices and Processes 3
Writing Electives - Choose three of the following:9-10
Writing for Workplaces
Technical Writing
Writing for Health and Medicine
Introduction to Creative Writing
Crafting the Short Story
Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy
Creative Nonfiction
Creativity and Community
Life-Writing, Creativity and Community
Poetry and Community
Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies
Rhetorical Theories and Practices
The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
Feminist Rhetorics
The Rhetoric of Black Protest
Radical Writing: An Invitation to the Self
Writing Center Theory, Practice and Research
Creative Writing: Fiction
Creative Writing: Poetry
Topics in Writing
Seminar in Creative Writing
Writing Internship
Linguistics Requirement - Choose one of the following:3
Sociolinguistics
Exploring the English Language
Anatomy of English
History of the English Language
Studies in Language
Literature Elective - Choose one of the following:3
Literature and Genre
Books that Matter
Well Versed
Texts, Social Systems and Values
Global Literatures
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Drama
Introduction to Gothic Fiction
Modern Irish Literature
Contemporary Irish Literature
Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction
Jane Austen
Film Studies
The Art of War
Medicine and Literature
Disability and Literature
Literature and Place
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory
Global Hip Hop
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
British Literature of the Long 18th Century
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837
Romanticism and Nature
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
British Literature since 1900
Modernism
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
British Literature of the Postmodernist Period
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
J. R. R. Tolkien
Text in Context
Moby-Dick
James Joyce's Ulysses
Toni Morrison
Studies in Genre
Children's Literature
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies
What Is a Book?
The Epic
Fiction
Creative Nonfiction
Poetry
Words to Worlds
Digital Literacies
Law and Literature
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures
Studies in Literature and Culture
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Global Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Postcolonial Literatures
Global Literatures
Topics in Literature
Elective: Chose any 2000-, 3000-, or 4000- level ENGL course.3
Common Major Requirements12
Capstone Experience3
Seminar in Creative Writing
Capstone
Total Credit Hours:36-37

Literature Concentration

Literature Electives - Choose three of the following: 19
Literature and Genre
Books that Matter
Well Versed
Texts, Social Systems and Values
Global Literatures
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Drama
Introduction to Gothic Fiction
Modern Irish Literature
Contemporary Irish Literature
Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction
Jane Austen
Film Studies
The Art of War
Medicine and Literature
Disability and Literature
Literature and Place
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory
Global Hip Hop
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
British Literature of the Long 18th Century
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837
Romanticism and Nature
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
British Literature since 1900
Modernism
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
British Literature of the Postmodernist Period
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
J. R. R. Tolkien
Text in Context
Moby-Dick
James Joyce's Ulysses
Toni Morrison
Studies in Genre
Children's Literature
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies
What Is a Book?
The Epic
Fiction
Creative Nonfiction
Poetry
Words to Worlds
Digital Literacies
Law and Literature
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures
Studies in Literature and Culture
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Global Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Postcolonial Literatures
Global Literatures
Topics in Literature
Additional Electives: Chose any two ENGL courses other than ENGL 1001. 26
Common Major Requirements12
Capstone Experience3
Seminar in Creative Writing
Capstone
Total Credit Hours:30

Language Arts Concentration

ENGL 3210Writing Practices and Processes 3
Linguistics Requirement - Choose one of the following:3
Sociolinguistics
Exploring the English Language
Anatomy of English
History of the English Language
Studies in Language
Shakespeare requirement3
Shakespeare
American Literature Requirement - Choose one of the following: 13
Drama
Introduction to Gothic Fiction
Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction
Film Studies
The Art of War
Medicine and Literature
Literature and Place
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory
Feminist Rhetorics
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
Modernism
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
Text in Context
Moby-Dick
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
Studies in Genre
Children's Literature
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies
Fiction
Creative Nonfiction
Poetry
Words to Worlds
Law and Literature
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures
Studies in Literature and Culture
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Topics in Literature
Multicultural American Literature Requirement - Choose one of the following:3
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
The Rhetoric of Black Protest
Toni Morrison
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Global Indigenous Literatures 1
Africana Literatures 1
Writing Course Requirement - Choose one of the following3
Writing for Workplaces
Technical Writing
Writing for Health and Medicine
Introduction to Creative Writing
Crafting the Short Story
Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy
Creative Nonfiction
Creativity and Community
Life-Writing, Creativity and Community
Poetry and Community
Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies
Rhetorical Theories and Practices
Writing Center Theory, Practice and Research
Creative Writing: Fiction
Creative Writing: Poetry
Elective - Choose any 2000-, 3000-, or 4000-level ENGL course.3
Common Major Requirements12
Total Credit Hours:33

Minor in Creative Writing

The creative writing minor consists of six courses (18 credit hours), divided among Groups I-IV, as listed below:

Group I: Foundational course3
Introduction to Literary Studies
Group II: Introduction to Creative Writing3
Introduction to Creative Writing
Group III: Literature Electives - Choose two from the following: 16
Books that Matter
Well Versed
Texts, Social Systems and Values
Global Literatures
Sociolinguistics
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Drama
Introduction to Gothic Fiction
Modern Irish Literature
Contemporary Irish Literature
Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction
Jane Austen
Film Studies
The Art of War
Medicine and Literature
Disability and Literature
Literature and Place
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory
Global Hip Hop
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning
Exploring the English Language
Anatomy of English
Honors Anatomy of English
History of the English Language
Studies in Language
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Honors Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
British Literature of the Long 18th Century
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837
Romanticism and Nature
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
British Literature since 1900
Modernism
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
British Literature of the Postmodernist Period
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
J. R. R. Tolkien
Text in Context
Moby-Dick
James Joyce's Ulysses
Toni Morrison
Studies in Genre
Children's Literature
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies
What Is a Book?
The Epic
Fiction
Creative Nonfiction
Poetry
Words to Worlds
Digital Literacies
Law and Literature
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures
Studies in Literature and Culture
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Global Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Postcolonial Literatures
Global Literatures
Topics in Literature
Group IV: Creative Writing Electives - Choose two from the following: 6
Crafting the Short Story
Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy
Creative Nonfiction
Creativity and Community
Life-Writing, Creativity and Community
Poetry and Community
Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies
Creative Writing: Fiction
Creative Writing: Poetry
Seminar in Creative Writing
Total Credit Hours:18

 

Minor in Literature

The minor in literature consists of 18 credit hours, divided between Groups I and II, as listed below:

Group I: Foundational course3
Introduction to Literary Studies
Group II: Electives - Choose any five courses, no more than one of which may be a writing course and no more than one of which may be a 2000-level course:15
Ways of Knowing
Literature and Genre
Books that Matter
Well Versed
Texts, Social Systems and Values
Global Literatures
Sociolinguistics
Writing Practices and Processes
Writing for Workplaces
Technical Writing
Writing for Health and Medicine
Crafting the Short Story
Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy
Creative Nonfiction
Creativity and Community
Life-Writing, Creativity and Community
Poetry and Community
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Drama
Introduction to Gothic Fiction
Modern Irish Literature
Contemporary Irish Literature
Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction
Jane Austen
Film Studies
The Art of War
Medicine and Literature
Disability and Literature
Literature and Place
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory
Global Hip Hop
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning
Exploring the English Language
Anatomy of English
History of the English Language
Studies in Language
Rhetorical Theories and Practices
Honors Rhetorical Theories and Practices
The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Honors Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
British Literature of the Long 18th Century
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837
Romanticism and Nature
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
British Literature since 1900
Modernism
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
British Literature of the Postmodernist Period
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
J. R. R. Tolkien
Text in Context
Moby-Dick
James Joyce's Ulysses
Toni Morrison
Studies in Genre
Children's Literature
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies
What Is a Book?
The Epic
Fiction
Creative Nonfiction
Poetry
Words to Worlds
Digital Literacies
Law and Literature
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures
Studies in Literature and Culture
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Global Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Postcolonial Literatures
Global Literatures
Topics in Literature
Independent Study in English
Capstone
Senior Thesis
Writing Courses (no more than one):
Writing Practices and Processes
Writing for Workplaces
Writing for Health and Medicine
Introduction to Creative Writing
Crafting the Short Story
Creativity and Community
Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies
Rhetorical Theories and Practices
The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
Feminist Rhetorics
The Rhetoric of Black Protest
Radical Writing: An Invitation to the Self
Writing Center Theory, Practice and Research
Creative Writing: Fiction
Creative Writing: Poetry
Topics in Writing
Seminar in Creative Writing
Writing Internship
Internship in Publishing
Total Credit Hours:18

Department of Public Instruction Certification - English Literature Minor

To pursue Department of Public Instruction certification, College of Education students are required to complete the following requirements for an English literature minor. The minor consists of 21-22 credit hours, divided according to Groups I-VII, as listed below:

Required Courses

Group I: Foundational course3
Introduction to Literary Studies
Group II: Language Study - Choose one of the following:3
Sociolinguistics
Exploring the English Language
Anatomy of English
History of the English Language
Studies in Language
Group III: Literature pre-1700 - Choose one of the following3
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Honors Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
What Is a Book?
Group IV: Multicultural - Choose one of the following:3
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Or, when course content is Multicultural:
Topics in Literature
Group V: American Literature - Choose one of the following upper-division electives in American Literature:3
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
US Literature after World War II
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Or, when course content is American:
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
Studies in Genre
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Topics in Literature
Senior Thesis
Group VI: Advanced Composition3
Writing Practices and Processes
Group VII: Elective - any ENGL course at the 2000 level and above.3-4
Ways of Knowing
Literature and Genre
Books that Matter
Texts, Social Systems and Values
Global Literatures
Writing for Workplaces
Writing for Health and Medicine
Introduction to Creative Writing
Crafting the Short Story
Creativity and Community
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Introduction to Gothic Fiction
Modern Irish Literature
Jane Austen
Film Studies
The Art of War
Disability and Literature
Literature and Place
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory
Global Hip Hop
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning
Exploring the English Language
Anatomy of English
History of the English Language
Studies in Language
Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies
Rhetorical Theories and Practices
The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
Writing Center Theory, Practice and Research
Creative Writing: Fiction
Creative Writing: Poetry
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
British Literature of the Long 18th Century
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837
Romanticism and Nature
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
British Literature since 1900
Modernism
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
British Literature of the Postmodernist Period
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
J. R. R. Tolkien
Text in Context
Moby-Dick
James Joyce's Ulysses
Studies in Genre
Children's Literature
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies
The Epic
Fiction
Creative Nonfiction
Poetry
Digital Literacies
Law and Literature
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures
Studies in Literature and Culture
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Postcolonial Literatures
Global Literatures
Topics in Literature
Topics in Writing
Seminar in Creative Writing
Writing Internship
Independent Study in English
Capstone
Senior Thesis
Total Credit Hours:21-22


 

Minor in the Literature of Diverse Cultures

The minor in Literature of Diverse Cultures consists of 18 credit hours, divided according to Groups I-III, as listed below:

Group I - Foundational course3
Introduction to Literary Studies
Group II - Race, Ethnicity and Identity in American Literature and Culture3
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Group III - Electives12
Four upper-division literature electives, choose at least three from the following: 1
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
Global Hip Hop
Toni Morrison
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Global Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Postcolonial Literatures
Global Literatures
The fourth literature elective is a general elective. It can be fulfilled by one of the courses listed above or by one of the following:
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Drama
Introduction to Gothic Fiction
Modern Irish Literature
Contemporary Irish Literature
Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction
Jane Austen
Film Studies
The Art of War
Medicine and Literature
Disability and Literature
Literature and Place
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning
Exploring the English Language
Anatomy of English
History of the English Language
Studies in Language
The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
Feminist Rhetorics
The Rhetoric of Black Protest
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
British Literature of the Long 18th Century
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
Romanticism and Nature
British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
British Literature since 1900
Modernism
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
British Literature of the Postmodernist Period
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
J. R. R. Tolkien
Text in Context
Moby-Dick
James Joyce's Ulysses
Studies in Genre
Children's Literature
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies
What Is a Book?
The Epic
Fiction
Creative Nonfiction
Poetry
Words to Worlds
Digital Literacies
Law and Literature
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures
Studies in Literature and Culture
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Topics in Literature
Independent Study in English
Capstone
Senior Thesis
Total Credit Hours:18

Minor in Writing-Intensive English

The minor consists of six courses (18 credit hours), divided according to Groups I - IV, as listed below:

Group I: Foundational course3
Introduction to Literary Studies
Group II: Advanced Composition3
Writing Practices and Processes
Group III: Literature Elective - One literature elective, chosen from the following:3
Books that Matter
Well Versed
Texts, Social Systems and Values
Global Literatures
Here Be Monsters
Crossing Over
Drama
Introduction to Gothic Fiction
Modern Irish Literature
Contemporary Irish Literature
Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction
Jane Austen
Film Studies
The Art of War
Medicine and Literature
Disability and Literature
Literature and Place
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory
Global Hip Hop
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning
Medieval Literature and Chaucer
Studies in the Medieval Imagination
Themes in Medieval Literature
British Literature of the 16th Century
Shakespeare
British Literature of the 17th Century
Milton
Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America
The Novel to 1900
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900
British Literature of the Long 18th Century
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment
US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic
US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War
British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837
Romanticism and Nature
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900
US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century
British Literature since 1900
Modernism
US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II
British Literature of the Postmodernist Period
US Literature after World War II
Literatures of the 21st Century
Individual Authors
J. R. R. Tolkien
Text in Context
Moby-Dick
James Joyce's Ulysses
Toni Morrison
Studies in Genre
Children's Literature
Science Fiction/Fantasy
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies
What Is a Book?
The Epic
Fiction
Creative Nonfiction
Poetry
Words to Worlds
Digital Literacies
Law and Literature
Neuroscience and Literature
Material Cultures
Studies in Literature and Culture
Gender, Sexuality, Literature
Women Writers
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies
Native American / Indigenous Literatures
Global Indigenous Literatures
Africana Literatures
Postcolonial Literatures
Global Literatures
Topics in Literature
Capstone
Senior Thesis
Group IV: Writing Electives - Three writing course electives, chosen from the following:9
Ways of Knowing
Writing for Workplaces
Technical Writing
Writing for Health and Medicine
Introduction to Creative Writing
Crafting the Short Story
Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy
Creative Nonfiction
Creativity and Community
Life-Writing, Creativity and Community
Poetry and Community
Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies
Rhetorical Theories and Practices
The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X
Feminist Rhetorics
The Rhetoric of Black Protest
Radical Writing: An Invitation to the Self
Writing Center Theory, Practice and Research
Creative Writing: Fiction
Creative Writing: Poetry
Topics in Writing
Seminar in Creative Writing
Writing Internship
Or, when the course content focuses on writing:
Independent Study in English
Senior Thesis
One of the three courses may be chosen from the following:
Sociolinguistics
Exploring the English Language
Anatomy of English
History of the English Language
Studies in Language
Total Credit Hours:18

Curricular Requirements

Humanities Disciplinary Honors is available for the Literature and Writing Intensive English Majors. Students should begin discussing Disciplinary Honors with the major advisor in their sophomore year in preparation for taking the required courses as juniors.

Seminar Series 13
Introduction to Honors in the Humanities
Developing a Humanities Honors Project and Writing a Research Proposal
Humanities Honors Project Seminar
One upper-division English course thematically paired by the student with:3
One upper-division course in another department3
ENGL 4999HHonors Senior Thesis 23
Total Credit Hours:12

Notes:

  • Two upper-level departmental courses, one in the student’s major and one that must be in another department are required. Each must be a 3-credit, graded course and must have the approval of the HiH director. These courses are normally taken during student’s junior year. The courses in the student’s major count toward total major credits and toward other major requirements where applicable. The course in another department does not count toward major requirements.
  • These two thematically paired courses are carefully chosen by the individual student to help them set a foundation for their independent research project. Ideally these offer background, help the student develop new questions and allow for new perspectives on these questions. 
  • Students may take these upper-level thematically paired courses concurrently or in different terms; they should have finished at least one before beginning their independent projects.  

Academic Standards

Students must have a 3.200 cumulative overall grade point average for entry into the Humanities Disciplinary Honors Program. Students must achieve a 3.200 cumulative grade point average in the above 12 credit hours required in order to graduate with Humanities Disciplinary Honors. Students who complete both Core Honors and Humanities Disciplinary Honors earn a Comprehensive Honors degree. Students must have a 3.200 cumulative GPA to graduate with this degree. Students admitted to Humanities Disciplinary Honors become part of the University Honors Program and are eligible for Honors research fellowships and Honors study-abroad scholarships. If an Honors student drops below a 3.200 in any given term during the junior year or any subsequent year, the student receives a letter of warning from the director. If a student drops below a 3.200 cumulative GPA, they are placed on University Honors Program academic probation; if they do not achieve a 3.200 cumulative GPA by the end of the following term, they are removed from the program. Students must earn a grade of C or better in all courses required for Humanities Disciplinary Honors and the Comprehensive Honors degree.

Additional Requirements:

  • The student must submit a written application to the program after HOPR 2954H but before HOPR 3954H that includes a description of the project they would like to pursue, a brief list of potential faculty mentors and another brief list of possible course pairings with explanations of how each might further develop the research plan. This application is read by both the director and the appropriate disciplinary committee member.
  • A research proposal is produced in HOPR 3954H for the ENGL 4999H thesis project that contains a reflection on the paired courses and how they have shaped the project--including the research questions, methodology and literature review. The student also has a mentor in place for the ENGL 4999H by the end of HOPR 3954H.
  • The final ENGL 4999H thesis project is graded by the disciplinary faculty mentor, but is also assessed by the appropriate HiH board member (eg: a thesis in History would be graded by the thesis director and then assessed by the History HiH board member on a S/U basis). 
  • Presentation is an important component of research and as such students are required to present their work either at the end of the HOPR 4954H term or the following term. Ideally, the student presents their work at the Marquette University Undergraduate Humanities Conference if it is held in the spring term following the HOPR 4954H.

Eligibility

Humanities Disciplinary Honors is designed to be completed during students’ junior and senior years. Sophomores interested in pursuing Humanities Disciplinary Honors should enroll in HOPR 2954H during their sophomore year. Sophomores are eligible to apply to the program near the end of the spring term as long as they meet the 3.200 minimum cumulative GPA requirement.  

Application

Students are encouraged to apply following successful completion of HOPR 2954H, but applications are also accepted in the fall term of the junior year. Students apply for admission to the Honors in the Humanities director. Application materials may be obtained by contacting kristen.foster@marquette.edu.

Courses

ENGL 1001. Foundations in Rhetoric. 3 cr. hrs.

Process-based introduction to applying rhetorical principles to source-based writing and speaking with multimedia for diverse audiences.

ENGL 1002. Foundations of Rhetoric 2. 3 cr. hrs.

Continuation of ENGL 1001. Focus on principles of rhetoric and composition. Investigation and practice of the uses of the written language in exposition, persuasion, and critical analysis. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or equiv.

ENGL 1302H. Honors English 2. 3 cr. hrs.

Study the ways in which human beings have fashioned imaginative works that reflect, challenge and transfigure the worlds in which they live, with intensive analysis of texts selected from such writers as Adams, Austen, the Brontes, Camus, Chopin, Dostoevsky, T.S. Eliot, Faulkner, Flaubert, Hemingway, Kafka, Keats, Melville, Morrison, Pope, Rhys, the Shelleys, Swift, Voltaire, Woolf and Wordsworth. Strong emphasis placed on student writing. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Equivalent of ENGL 2000 or ENGL 2010 for English majors and minors. Prereq: Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

ENGL 2001. Ways of Knowing. 3 cr. hrs.

Engages students as writers in the broad, introductory study of different research methods and methodologies. Surveys the ways people seek, make sense of, and share knowledge, paying attention to history, culture and use. Invites hands-on learning through problem-based inquiry and short-form writing (including multimodal compositions) for different audiences. Regular reflection encourages self-awareness and sustained attention to writers’ and researchers’ responsibilities to others. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 2010. Literature and Genre. 3 cr. hrs.

Learn to analyze literature and its genre conventions in a self-conscious, logical and rigorous manner. Discover the pleasure of reading complex works of art and develop critical thinking habits for life beyond the university. Genre (e.g., novel, short story, drama, poetry, film) provides one of the most basic ways of creating meaning. Focus varies by instructor; students should consult the Department of English website for information on specific sections. Course may be repeated if instructor and subtitle are different. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 2011. Books that Matter. 3 cr. hrs.

Begins with the premise that reading challenging, complex literature well is a useful and important activity. Models a variety of reading practices to help students to make reading a personally meaningful activity. Encourages students to become lifelong readers by choosing a variety of texts that are pleasurable to read.

ENGL 2012. Well Versed. 3 cr. hrs.

Learn to deepen your appreciation of great poems without fear. Survey a variety of poetic forms while practicing the basics of poetic reading. Discover that reading poetry can be a deeply joyful process. Read a wide range of poets, from medieval to modern. Practice listening to poetry together in class by reading aloud ourselves, but also playing contemporary spoken-word poets and lyricists. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 2020. Texts, Social Systems and Values. 3 cr. hrs.

Engage fictional and nonfictional texts that represent differences and similarities among diverse groups of people. Ask hard questions about what it means to belong to a community. Learn how groups are constituted through language. Examine how literary texts register and transmit social equality and inequality, and how the acts of reading and writing can prepare everyone to act as people "with and for others.”.

ENGL 2030. Global Literatures. 3 cr. hrs.

Engage the challenging process of reading fictional and nonfictional texts from a range of cultures across the world. Investigate the nature and formation of discursive communities and the reasons why some of those communities have power and status and others do not. Examine how literary texts register and transmit social equality and inequality, how literature acts as an agent for social change and how reading and writing can create bridges between cultures. Recognize your own position in social systems and think about how you contribute to creating conditions of equality/inclusivity or inequality/exclusion. The goal is to reflect on our own values and social contexts in order to imagine how best to engage social systems and values systems different from our own.

ENGL 3000. Introduction to Literary Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

Learn the key foundational questions and practices in literary studies. Gain a more sophisticated ability to draw upon historical and cultural contexts to understand literary works. Learn how to read different genres. Explore significant questions in light of current debates within the disciplines. The focus of the content varies by instructor. Students should consult the Department of English website for information on specific sections before enrolling. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3140. Sociolinguistics. 3 cr. hrs.

Understand how every day, simply by speaking, we reconstruct the world and our place in it: our age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, place of origin and more. Grapple with the following questions: How does language reflect and create social difference? Why do languages change? What is the role of language legislation and language education in working for social justice? Topics may include linguistic diversity in Milwaukee, World Englishes, language and gender, and African-American English. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3210. Writing Practices and Processes. 3 cr. hrs.

Engage in and reflect on multiple processes of writing; compose in different media and/or genres; address a variety of rhetorical situations and audiences; and examine how social power relates to uses of writing. Consider key questions: What can writing do? Who am I as a writer? Who am I as a writer among others? What responsibilities do I have when I write? Required for ENGW and ENGA majors, but open to all. May not be counted as a Literature course. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3220. Writing for Workplaces. 3 cr. hrs.

Examine workplace writing (broadly defined) from a rhetorical perspective, with particular emphases on purposes, genres, styles, and audiences. Understand practical workplace problems and respond to these problems by designing, composing, and revising workplace documents, such as resumes, letters, memos, emails, reports and webpages as well as oral and visual presentations. May not be counted as a Literature course. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3221. Technical Writing. 3 cr. hrs.

Research, write, design and edit technical documents, including technical descriptions, reports and procedures. Projects individualized to meet students' needs and interests. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3222. Writing for Health and Medicine. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines health writing (including illness narratives, academic research articles, public health texts and science journalism) with an eye towards both critique and imitation. Relevant to humanities students interested in technical communication in the health industry and sciences student thinking about a career in the health sciences or graduate school. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3240. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 cr. hrs.

So you want to write? Introduces students to the writing (and reading) of two or more creative writing genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, playwriting and/or screenwriting. Students read and write in a variety of poetic forms and prose structures (content varies according to instructor), allowing the students to find a voice in the context of a supportive, rigorous and exploratory atmosphere. By analyzing published work in various genres from the practitioner’s perspective, by writing and revising their own work, by developing a portfolio of their drafts and revisions, and by discussing their work and the work of their peers in workshop, students learn writing craft and technique, develop their creative and critical thinking skills, and gain an appreciation for the ways in which creative writing—their writing—reflects on, engages and helps shape the culture in which it is created. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3241. Crafting the Short Story. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore core concepts of the short story—character, perspective, plot, setting, metaphor, voice and genre—alongside celebrated short stories that exemplify or challenge that concept. Respond to the stories in a critical and analytic mode. Collaborate with classmates in a “rewriting lab,” composing short pieces that experiment with each concept from a more creative perspective. Draft and revise an original short story. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3242. Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy. 3 cr. hrs.

Write, workshop and revise narratives from what is broadly called speculative fiction (science fiction, fantasy, horror, supernatural romance and more). Learn how to build out the complex storyworld background necessary for a prose, gaming or screenwriting project. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3245. Creative Nonfiction. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore how creative nonfiction deploys literary techniques associated with fictional prose in the service of stories that are actually true. Develop a creative nonfiction project through analyzing prominent examples of creative nonfiction, by writing and revising creative nonfiction pieces of varying lengths, and by workshopping creative nonfiction with peers. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1995H.

ENGL 3249. Creativity and Community. 3 cr. hrs.

Challenges the idea that creative genius is an elite phenomenon owned by a select few people. Asks students to explore their own creativity alongside members of the local community through experiential learning. Uses art as a powerful medium to form communities across socioeconomic, racial, ethnic and experiential divisions. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3250. Life-Writing, Creativity and Community. 3 cr. hrs.

Study and practice life-writing techniques while learning about memory as it relates to narrative. Read a diverse array of memoirs from across the life-course. Explore questions of language and representation, memory and imagination, creativity and authenticity, and individual and group identities. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3261. Poetry and Community. 3 cr. hrs.

Read and write poetry in the context of present-tense concerns and experiences. Forge a community of writers through workshop exercises and practice. Explore the relationship between textual revision and personal/social transformation. Discover how poetry connects to contemporary art, music, politics, and the environment. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3301. Here Be Monsters. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore the monster myths of medieval Europe that use monstrosity in inventive ways to think through sociopolitical issues. Working through medieval monster myths, consider a variety of socially-constructed boundaries and the questions they raise about gender roles and ethnic and religious difference. Consider the relevance of these myths to the contemporary world. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3302. Crossing Over. 3 cr. hrs.

Considers the boundary between life and death, salvation and damnation, animal and human, and human and fairy in medieval writings. Explores how early modern texts represented ethnic and racial difference. Throughout, examines how “English” texts that were not always originally composed in English and how England itself is a place of crossroads. Grapples with the question: what exactly is “English” literature? Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3410. Drama. 3 cr. hrs.

Read and see some of the great plays of the British and Irish dramatic tradition, from William Shakespeare to Martin McDonagh. Engage in playful reading practices to understand drama as a living form meant for performance. Evaluate how drama operates on our minds and emotions. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3462. Introduction to Gothic Fiction. 3 cr. hrs.

Trace the development of the Gothic tradition from its origins in the late eighteenth century to the present day, with attention to formal experiments and cultural concerns. Consider how Gothic texts comment on gender, sexuality, race, and the body, as well as crime, transgression and guilt. Authors may include Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Toni Morrison. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3513. Modern Irish Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Reads modern Irish literature as an archive of contested cultural memory in which writers tried to generate a usable past for a public whose history has been defined by colonial oppression, enforced amnesia of their native language, and violence. Studies some of the best-knows writers from Ireland in the modern period, from Oscar Wilde, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and J.M. Synge to, more recently, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, Marina Carr, Conor McPherson, Colm Toibin and Colum McCann. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3514. Contemporary Irish Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Read some of the most exciting works of Irish literature and film produced in the 21st century. Understand how distinct literary forms perform different cultural work as Irish literature attempts imagining new futures that can cope with the weight of Irish history and its embodied cultural memories Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3517. Memory and Forgetting in Contemporary Historical Fiction. 3 cr. hrs.

Ask why some of the best recent works of contemporary historical fiction has been obsessed with remembering, distorting, clarifying, appropriating and forgetting the distant and recent past. Explore what contemporary historical fiction has to show us about our own moment in history. Consider how contemporary historical fiction is not only about history but also invites us to think with it about the ethics of what we remember and what we don’t. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3611. Jane Austen. 3 cr. hrs.

Study Jane Austen’s greatest novels to understand how they depicted and challenged the inner lives of women in a culture that kept them from achieving their full human potential and in a patriarchal society rigged against them. Through attentive readings, examine the ways that Austen innovated the novel form to intervene in the cultural paradigms of her time. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3740. Film Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

Study film from a media studies perspective and consider audiovisual reception, the political economy of the culture industry, and developments in the cinematic apparatus alongside narrative analysis. Specific topics may vary. Explore cinematic depictions of refugees and migrants in the contemporary world and/or the potential for film as a medium to circulate in the global economy. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3751. The Art of War. 3 cr. hrs.

Examine war fiction to consider the various strategies writers have employed to justify or condemn war, to make the experiences of soldiers real and important to civilian readers, and to process the home front in the aftermath of war. Become attentive to how fiction depicts the experience of soldiers, from enlistment, to combat and homecoming. Consider how fiction has attempted to convey the traumatic, inexpressible pain of war for all members of the community. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3761. Medicine and Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Study illness stories in literary genres spanning the eighteenth through early twentieth centuries. Explore how culture constructs stories of sickness and how those stories shape our own experiences of health and wellbeing. Contrasting stories from distinct and sometimes opposing perspectives (e.g., experience gap between doctor and patient; different cultural notions of health; differences in gender, race, class and social status), learn how to listen and respond to various ways people tell their own illness stories. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3762. Disability and Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Examine disability as a cultural phenomenon affecting around 50 million Americans in order to work toward a more socially just future. Learn how to apply innovative thought about disability to interpretations of literature, film and popular culture. Key questions addressed include, how is disability commonly represented in visual and print media, and how can we transform that understanding to work toward the creation of more inclusive communities? Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3775. Literature and Place. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore how the “spirit of place” articulated in early American communities produces and portrays a range of individualisms. Examine early American writers who portray individual characters establishing themselves within a particular setting, challenging while contributing to their social environment, as well as experiencing resistance, prejudice, and oppression from the communal setting. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3780. Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates. 3 cr. hrs.

Delve into the history of water relations by looking at various Indigenous texts, stories, poetry, maps, artworks and cultural materials that speak to the history and ongoing water relationships. Learn about Native American and Indigenous philosophies about water as well as efforts, particularly located in the Mid-West and Plains regions of the United States, to address changing climates with a focus on water protection. Understand how this vital element shapes our relationships to each other and to the state. Includes experiential learning opportunities and work collaboratively with peers on multimedia projects. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3785. LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory. 3 cr. hrs.

Examine the work of LGBTQ+ authors, artists, and directors. Consider the significance of LGBTQ+ identities for our contemporary culture. Critique widespread cultural assumptions that uphold the violence of ableism, heteronormativity, racism, sexism and transphobia. Address LGBTQ+ as a social justice issue through analysis of films and literary texts that represent diverse LGBTQ+ identities. May include authors such as E.M. Forster, James Baldwin, Alison Bechdel, Christopher Isherwood, Janet Mock and Gloria Anzaldua. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR1955H.

ENGL 3841. Global Hip Hop. 3 cr. hrs.

Examine the literary qualities of hip hop in global contexts. Engage in a rigorous close reading of hip hop lyrical and filmic texts from different countries and continents, studying them comparatively within the larger framework of their rhetorical strategies, narrative structures and reinvention of oral literary traditions. Explore how hip hop artists mobilize the symbolic force of hip hop to engage with marginalities that are connected to race, place, ethnicity, culture, language, gender and sexuality and age. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 3860. The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning. 3 cr. hrs.

Engage and be transformed by the masterpieces of three giants of Russian literature: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and Bulgakov. Understand reading as a way to address crucial questions that animate human existence: Why do bad things happen to innocent people? What does goodness look like in the world? How can one overcome despair and continue to live a hopeful life? Does life have meaning, and if so, what might that be? All works read in translation. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4110. Exploring the English Language. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores how humans use a small set of sounds to express an infinite set of meanings, why dialects exist, and if other species have language. Studies the physical, cognitive and social dimensions of human language. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H. Fulfills the language requirement for ENGA and ENGW majors, or an elective requirement for ENGL and ENGW majors.

ENGL 4120. Anatomy of English. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore the glamour of grammar (the words are related!) as we develop a working model of the structure of sounds, words and sentences of English and develop a basis for making informed decisions about style, usage and grammar pedagogy. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H. Fulfills the language requirement for ENGA and ENGW majors, or an elective requirement for ENGL and ENGW majors.

ENGL 4120H. Honors Anatomy of English. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore the glamour of grammar (the words are related!) as we develop a working model of the structure of sounds, words and sentences of English and develop a basis for making informed decisions about style, usage and grammar pedagogy. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H; admission to English Disciplinary Honors Program. Fulfills the language requirement for ENGA and ENGW majors, or an elective requirement for ENGL and ENGW majors.

ENGL 4130. History of the English Language. 3 cr. hrs.

Marauding Germanic tribes in a corner of Europe in the 5th century established an island society whose native tongue is now spoken by billions around the world as the language of business, technology, and diplomacy. This is the story of English from before Ælfric to present-day Zimbabwe. Explore the nature of linguistic change, major developments in the structure and use of the English language, and current variation in English worldwide. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H. Fulfills the language requirement for ENGA and ENGW majors, or an elective requirement for ENGL and ENGW majors.

ENGL 4170. Studies in Language. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores topics in linguistics such as language and cognition; phonology; language and gender; English as world language; and language in the city, among others. See course listings on English Department website for current topics. May be repeated if topic is different. Prereq: ENGL 1001 and HOPR 1955H. Fulfills the language requirement for ENGA and ENGW majors, or an elective requirement for ENGL and ENGW majors.

ENGL 4210. Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores current topics within rhetoric and composition, such as community literacy, digital rhetoric, multimodal composing, women's rhetorics, rhetorics of peace, writing and race and others. Engages these (inter)disciplinary conversations by developing scholarly and/or community-based projects that combine critical thinking, research, and reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4220. Rhetorical Theories and Practices. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores rhetoric, how a knowledge of rhetorical theories enhance critical thinking, reading, writing, speaking, listening and others by tracing rhetorical theories spanning from Greco-Roman ideas about the logic and ethics of argument to contemporary concepts of identification, performativity and raced voices and consciousness. May include opportunities to analyze texts, people and cultures and to compose and revise texts in different genres, media, contexts and styles for a variety of audiences. May not be counted as a Literature course. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4220H. Honors Rhetorical Theories and Practices. 3 cr. hrs.

What is rhetoric, and how does a knowledge of rhetorical theories enhance critical thinking, reading, writing, speaking, and listening? In this theory and writing course, students explore these questions and others by exploring rhetorical theories spanning from Greco-Roman ideas about the logic and ethics of argument to contemporary concepts of identification, performativity, and raced voices and consciousness. Assignments may include opportunities to analyze texts, people, and cultures and to compose and revise texts in different genres, media, contexts, and styles for a variety of audiences. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H; admission to English Disciplinary Honors Program.

ENGL 4221. The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines two of the most well-known figures from the African American civil rights movement of the 1960s: Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. Evaluates the rhetoric of King and Malcolm X within their historical contexts and contemporary narratives about them. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4222. Feminist Rhetorics. 3 cr. hrs.

Engage with women’s writing throughout history to understand a variety of rhetorical strategies and how feminist thought has developed and transformed over time. Proceed chronologically, beginning with ancient writing and rhetorical theory and working towards present day texts and frameworks. Frequent opportunities for application and practice are provided, including an in-class debate and an analysis of contemporary feminist rhetoric. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4223. The Rhetoric of Black Protest. 3 cr. hrs.

Examine the rhetorical strategies African Americans have used in their fight for racial justice. In addition to studying the rhetorical strategies, learn: 1) the historical events that led to the creation of the movement; 2) the various periods of the specific movement; and 3) the interpretations of the movement by both African Americans and the dominant culture. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4224. Radical Writing: An Invitation to the Self. 3 cr. hrs.

Hone decision-making processes by learning discernment practices grounded in Ignatian spirituality. Explore the art of discernment by critically examining readings, critically reflecting on life experiences, and writing about them as a way to better understand professional and personal callings. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4230. Writing Center Theory, Practice and Research. 4 cr. hrs.

Offers insight as to how conversations about writing helps writers and how writing centers promote change. Reveals the challenges and rewards of peer tutoring while studying the theory and practice of peer tutoring. Topics drawn from writing center scholarship include processes of written, oral, and multimodal composition; concepts of genre and situation; and strategies for giving writers effective feedback. Includes a required writing center “internship.” Upon completion, students can apply to become Ott Memorial Writing Center tutors. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4250. Creative Writing: Fiction. 3 cr. hrs.

Engages narrative imagination and harnesses it productively to explore the spectrum between and including tragedy to comedy. Teaches the craft and techniques of writing fiction and the creative process by analyzing published fiction from the practitioner’s perspective, by writing and revising, and by discussing participant writings in workshop. May not be counted as a Literature course. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4260. Creative Writing: Poetry. 3 cr. hrs.

Discover how poetry is all about surprise and how the practice of poetry develops innovation in writing and thinking. Explore the work of living poets while developing a portfolio of drafts and revisions. The workshop format, open and accessible to all - from beginners to advanced practitioners - allows students to find their voice in the context of a supportive, rigorous and exploratory atmosphere. May not be counted as a Literature course. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4301. Medieval Literature and Chaucer. 3 cr. hrs.

"The Canterbury Tales" sets itself in the late decades of fourteenth-century England when political upheavals and revolts against feudal hierarchy were abroad in both country and court: agricultural workers rising up against tax burdens, friars being viewed as figures of excess, women increasing pressure to compete in the marketplace and to travel, prompting thereby hundreds of treatises censuring them as unruly and dangerous to society. Chaucer, however, seems to have thrived on such havoc. His are nervy questions in his "Tales" as he explores corruption within the Church, the dangerous and comical effects of courtly love, women challenging clerical interpretation of Scripture, men who try to hold their wives “narwe in cage,” what constitutes happiness, the impulses behind our choices, and the clergy’s abuse of knowledge. The explorations are both comic and dead-serious. Text include "Troilus and Criseyde" and "The Canterbury Tales." Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4301H. Honors Medieval Literature and Chaucer. 3 cr. hrs.

"The Canterbury Tales" sets itself in the late decades of fourteenth-century England when political upheavals and revolts against feudal hierarchy were abroad in both country and court: agricultural workers rising up against tax burdens, friars being viewed as figures of excess, women increasing pressure to compete in the marketplace and to travel, prompting thereby hundreds of treatises censuring them as unruly and dangerous to society. Chaucer, however, seems to have thrived on such havoc. His are nervy questions in his "Tales" as he explores corruption within the Church, the dangerous and comical effects of courtly love, women challenging clerical interpretation of Scripture, men who try to hold their wives “narwe in cage,” what constitutes happiness, the impulses behind our choices, and the clergy’s abuse of knowledge. The explorations are both comic and dead-serious. Text include "Troilus and Criseyde" and "The Canterbury Tales." As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H; admission to English Disciplinary Honors Program.

ENGL 4303. Studies in the Medieval Imagination. 3 cr. hrs.

Discover the origin of the very discipline we now call “English”, in its emphasis on “close reading” and “critical thinking”, in the medieval habits of reading the Bible allegorically for figurative meaning. Then as now, medieval bookworms sought to uncover the hidden truths that lay just below its surface. In the process, they read, absorbed and in turn produced their own allegorical texts, in which they clothed alien concepts in layers of symbolism and myth. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4311. Themes in Medieval Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Starting with the key sources in classical antiquity that informed English poets’ discussions of both love and war, examine the rise of English courtly love poetry in the context of a devastating and drawn-out conflict that would forever alter England’s cultural and political climate and set the stage for the birth of English nationalism: the pre-condition for the eventual formation of the British Empire and for the birth of “English” itself as an academic discipline in the university. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4321. British Literature of the 16th Century. 3 cr. hrs.

In the decades after the Reformation, Britain was roiled by religious and political debates both intensely local and far transcending the country’s national boundaries, at the same time that its citizens were figuring out for the first time what it meant to be a nation with its own distinct language and culture. Sonnets, epics, political treatises, closet drama, and the first plays for the public stage all competed in what became the country’s first public literary marketplace, as economic and political changes helped foster the first English literature and the first conception of the person that we can call truly modern. Students make themselves present at the hotly contested beginnings of genres, categories and ideas familiar enough to them now that they take them as natural, by reading poems and plays so enduring that 400 years later they are still part of our cultural fabric. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4331. Shakespeare. 3 cr. hrs.

Become aware of the extraordinary variety and breadth of the subjects that interested Shakespeare: property law, Roman history, same-sex love, gender-bending, political representation, profound questions of existence and ethics. Read poems and plays that both locate Shakespeare in his own particular context and suggest why his work has been so enduring and useful all over the modern world. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4341. British Literature of the 17th Century. 3 cr. hrs.

Colonialism and empire, economic slavery, regicide, revolution, one of the earliest experiments with republicanism in the modern world, the development of scientific empiricism and positivism, the invention of newspapers… all of these events and institutions in seventeenth-century Britain, so fundamental to our own culture, not only shaped but were shaped by its literature, which was one of the central public forums in which ideas were ventured and debated. Students read poems, plays, prose, and speeches by writers both famous and (now) obscure, from Francis Bacon and Mary Wroth to John Milton and Kenelm Digby, as a window into their thinking about such central problems as love, friendship, community, beauty, profit and self-interest, and political justice. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4351. Milton. 3 cr. hrs.

In our world, in which we debate how and if we can protect our freedoms, in which our use of reason has brought us such unprecedented power to communicate but also to destroy, and in which religious discourse figures so prominently, for good and for ill, Milton has particular relevance. His apparent confidence (arrogance?) in advancing his ideas, in many works but in "Paradise Lost" especially, forces each one of us to reevaluate our own. Students explore Milton’s major poetry and prose in the context of seventeenth-century England. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4361. Literatures of Pre-Colonial and Colonial America. 3 cr. hrs.

What constitutes the earliest forms of American literature? How did writing in the Americas prior to the foundation of modern nation-states grow out of and respond to the unique circumstances of contact and collision between the “Old World” of Europe and the “New World” of America? How was colonial American literature situated in the larger geopolitical arenas of the Atlantic World, the Black Atlantic, and competing imperialist projects? Students encounter the diverse genres and multiple literary traditions that converged in North America from the initial arrival of Europeans up to the American Revolution. May take a comparative transatlantic, transnational, and / or hemispheric approach, with readings drawn from the literatures of British, French and Spanish America as well as Native American cultures. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4402. The Novel to 1900. 3 cr. hrs.

Traces the development of the novel genre from its origins in the late seventeenth century to the end of the nineteenth, focusing on the relationship between literary form and social change. Considers writers’ treatment of topics such as personal identity and individual psychology, gender and marriage, race and empire, industrialization and market culture, and political and social reform. Authors may include Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Jane Austen, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Robert Louis Stevenson and Joseph Conrad. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4412. Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900. 3 cr. hrs.

Transatlantic studies reframe Anglophone literature (and sometimes literature in translation) to incorporate perspectives beyond the national. The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were eras of economic and cultural exchange across the Atlantic ocean; this course tracks some of these “currents.” Individual instructors may focus on comparative revolutions, on the Black Atlantic, on transnational romanticism, travel and exploration, slavery and abolition or other topics. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4422. British Literature of the Long 18th Century. 3 cr. hrs.

During the "long eighteenth century" (1660-1830), England experienced unprecedented literary and cultural innovation: writers developed new forms of fiction, actresses appeared on stage for the first time and poets used verse as vehicles for satirical and public expression. Meanwhile, political parties took shape, the government expanded the reach of its empire, the nuclear family assumed its modern form, and burgeoning print media provided a stream of gossip and news. Students explore the era’s literary developments in the context of such social, cultural and political changes. Topics vary each term. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4423. Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment. 3 cr. hrs.

Considers the centrality of law and lawlessness to eighteenth-century British fiction, while exploring the ways in which novels can help us understand the nature and consequences of illicit acts. Addresses questions concerning justice and judgment, crime and punishment, gender and marriage, and legal terror and popular violence. Authors may include Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen and Walter Scott. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4432. US Literatures of the Revolution and New Republic. 3 cr. hrs.

The eighteenth century saw profound changes in America; there were revolutions not only in politics but in the ways people lived their everyday lives, in travel, in industry and in literature. While the American Revolution ended the colonial domination of European settlers and the founding of the United States, those citizens in turn were colonizing Native American lands and African labor. Women clamored to be included in the democratic conversation, and the ideology of “Republican Mortherhood” simultaneously stimulated and constrained those desires. Students look at the ways a diverse group of writers responded to these sea changes by employing a comparative transatlantic or transpacific approach or by focusing more closely on issues specific to the North American continent; issues studied may include the rise of the novel and the changes in print culture surrounding the Revolution, or may focus on the literature of women or narratives of captivity and slavery. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4442. US Literature from the Constitution to the Civil War. 3 cr. hrs.

The first decades of the nineteenth century marked a period of innovation and abundance in the literary history of the United States. Students explore the landmark developments of the early national and antebellum periods within the broader contexts of American cultural history, paying particular attention to the influence of Romanticism and such North American variants as New England Transcendentalism and the American Gothic. They may also explore the intersections between literature and a variety of social reform movements, such as those involving abolitionism, women’s rights and Native American rights. Authors assigned may include a selection of the following: Apess (Pequot), Brockden Brown, Cooper, Irving, Poe, Sedgwick, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Wells Brown, Whitman and Stowe. Prereq: ENGL 1001 and HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4452. British Literature of the Romantic Period, 1790-1837. 3 cr. hrs.

From the French Revolution to the Industrial Revolution, 1780-1837. How exactly did civil and human rights evolve in Great Britain? Gender, class, religious turmoil and race are also central issues in the study of works by romantic-era writers such as Jane Austen, Ann Radcliffe, William Wordsworth, William Blake, John Keats, Percy Shelley, George Gordon Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Mary Shelley. Students study thematic approaches to or surveys of the literature of the period. Prereq: ENGL 1001 and HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4453. Romanticism and Nature. 3 cr. hrs.

Understand how the questions raised by Romantic thinkers in reaction to a period of radical intellectual, technological and sociopolitical changes revolutionized the western world’s attitude towards “nature.” Through experiential learning, visits to the Riverside Urban Ecology Center, examine how, in a very immediate way, today’s arguments about climate change, animal rights and ecology are products of contradictions first brought to light by Romanticism. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4472. British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines literary developments alongside broader transformations in Victorian culture, with special attention to social, political, and ethical concerns. Explores topics such as gender, marriage, and the family; industrialization and market culture; race and empire; crime and violence; and social and political reform. Studies authors such as Emily Brontë, Charles Dickens, John Stuart Mill, George Eliot, Robert Louis Stevenson, Thomas Hardy, and Oscar Wilde. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4482. US Literature from the Civil War to the Early 20th Century. 3 cr. hrs.

The period between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the twentieth century was one of profound social, technological and political changes in the United States. Students look at how writers reflected and responded to the world of the late nineteenth century (sometimes reaching into the early twentieth century) in literature written by American authors and, sometimes, by the European writers that influenced them during this period of intense transnational literary exchange. Course may address the waxing and waning popularity of sentimental literature, the elite enthusiasm for realist literature and the related growth of regional literature, the connection between fiction and the muckraking school of journalism, the expansion of publication in magazines and newspapers, the explosion of literatures by and about immigrants, and/or African American literary production in the eras of Reconstruction and Jim Crow. Students may read works by Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Mark Twain, William Dean Howells, W. E. B. DuBois, Charles Chesnutt, Theodore Dreiser, Frank Norris, Sarah Orne Jewett, Sarah M. B. Piatt, Zitkala Sa, Charlotte Perkins GIlman, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman and a multitude of others. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4503. British Literature since 1900. 3 cr. hrs.

Students explore English literature written since 1900, a period when writers have confronted the turbulence of modern history while defending the value of their art. The last century is marked by two world wars, the rise and fall of the British Empire, globalization, accelerating technological development, and changing gender roles and class structures. In this era, some artists have followed the modernist dictum to “make it new,” to overthrow, reimagine, and thus revitalize older forms of literary expression no longer attuned to the modern era, while others have sought to refine traditional structures for plays, poems, novels, and short stories. Against an historical backdrop that has witnessed the rise of radio, television, film, the Internet, and the 24-hour news cycle, writers have used their art to assert that (in the words of twentieth-century poet Ezra Pound) “literature is news that stays news.” Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4523. Modernism. 3 cr. hrs.

What should literature be and do in an era of war, revolution and cataclysmic cultural change? Modernist literature emerged across Europe and North America in the early twentieth century in response to this question. Old ideas and forms suddenly seemed ill-equipped to respond to the twentieth century, which led modernist artists to rebel against convention. Writers such as Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, H.D., W.B. Yeats and Gertrude Stein worked across languages, national traditions and genres to reinvent the literary past and change contemporary history. In the process, they created some of the most astonishing, daring and rewarding poems, novels and plays of the twentieth century. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4533. US Literature: 20th-Century Beginnings to World War II. 3 cr. hrs.

Students construct an overview of American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the end of World War II, focusing on the historical contexts of literary production. The themes and formal and stylistic aspects of the different works under discussion are situated within the context of the political, social, scientific, technological and economic transformations in this period of American history. Examines the interactions between the development of modern American literature and key issues of the period including racial segregation and racial uplift, class inequality, labor and immigration debates, the feminist movement, global war, the invention of the atom bomb and the rise of mass entertainments and consumerism. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4543. British Literature of the Postmodernist Period. 3 cr. hrs.

Students explore modern and contemporary English literature, which engages catastrophes and humiliations blared in countless headlines, from England’s near starvation by German U-boats in World War I to the loss of the Raj, the British expulsion from Suez and not long after what was once called Rhodesia, the Christine Keeler scandal and the Falklands debacle. Whether the collapse of the British empire qualifies as disaster, opportunity, retribution, graveyard or cradle depends on who is talking. And exactly who is talking, often for the first time, is the point. As Kipling feared, Conrad hoped, and Orwell predicted, the weakening empire gave new freedom and power to the once England itself. Students study the accelerating evolution of new genres, the trade-offs of dialect literature, the appropriation and/or resistance of "popular" cultures, the danger of the high-tech police state, and the search for a way to awaken the sleepwalkers and inspire the denialists without trampling their freedom, even if that freedom is enthralled to commercially motivated and cynically silenced and voiceless, not only in the former colonies and throughout the Commonwealth but within destructive mythologies. Among the storytellers and poets threading this labyrinth can be counted Auden, Orwell, Thomas, Reed, Bennett, Harrison, Wa Thiong’O, Larkin, Walcott, Hughes, Achebe, Naipaul, Heaney, Gordimer, Rushdie, Boland and Muldoon. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4553. US Literature after World War II. 3 cr. hrs.

Students explore fiction, poetry and drama composed since World War II, with special attention to the shift from modernism to postmodernism. How has American literature in the twentieth century responded to and been influenced by the civil rights and feminist movements, the Vietnam War, anti-communism, consumer culture, environmentalism, scientific and technological progress, economic crisis, and the ever-looming threat of the nuclear bomb? What are the intersections between literary culture and popular culture, and between literary culture and the state, in the high-water years of the “American Century”? Approaches vary with instructor, but authors studied are likely to include Auster, Baldwin, Barth, Bishop, Carson, Carver, DeLillo, Didion, Ellison, Erdrich, Graham, Heller, Kingston, Levine, Morrison, Nabokov, O'Connor, Ozick, Plath, Pynchon, Rich, Roth, Silko, Spiegelman, Stone, Vonnegut, Wallace, Walker and White. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4563. Literatures of the 21st Century. 3 cr. hrs.

Students study the literature of the twenty-first century from a variety of national and transnational perspectives. How have different authors responded to the rapid social changes and urgent political crises the world has undergone since the year 2000? What role has literature played in registering and shaping our collective response to these events? What is the continued relevance of literature (and literary study) for an era increasingly dominated by nonliterary and non-narrative media forms? Possible authors include Atwood, Díaz, Ishiguro, Lahiri, Mitchell, McCarthy, Morrison, Murakami, Saramago, Sebald, Smith, Rowling, Roy, Winterson and Wallace. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4610. Individual Authors. 3 cr. hrs.

Studies of the works of selected individual authors, usually within biographical, historical, intellectual, and/or cultural contexts. Authors studied may include Austen, the Brontes, the Brownings, Cheever and Carver, Conrad, Frost, Hardy and Hopkins, Heaney, Melville, Morrison, Wharton and Stein and Yeats. Consult Schedule of Classes or the English Department's website for specific author(s). Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4612. J. R. R. Tolkien. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore J.R.R. Tolkien's works, looking backward from the perspective of the twenty-first century. Consider why his works, and the genre of heroic fantasy which he remade so completely in his image, remained intensely popular, even as the world has transformed around them. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4615. Text in Context. 3 cr. hrs.

Students engage in an in-depth, semester-long study of a “major” or “monumental” work in its cultural and historical context. Alongside a close and thorough reading of the text, such a study may include analysis of its source texts; its contemporaneous interlocutors; significant critical and theoretical responses; transmedia adaptations; unauthorized rewrites, fan fictions and sequels; and contemporary remixes. Central texts vary from year to year but may include such works as "Paradise Lost," "Hamlet," "Frankenstein," "Middlemarch," "Ulysses," "Invisible Man," "One Hundred Years of Solitude," "Beloved," "Almanac of the Dead" or "Infinite Jest." Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4616. Moby-Dick. 3 cr. hrs.

Engage in an in-depth, semester-long study of a Herman Melville’s classic novel Moby-Dick as a “major” or “monumental” work in its cultural and historical context. Alongside a close and thorough reading of the text, the study may include analysis of its source texts; its contemporaneous interlocutors; significant critical and theoretical responses; transmedia adaptations; contemporary prequels, rewrites or remixes. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4617. James Joyce's Ulysses. 3 cr. hrs.

Embark on one of the great adventures of an academic career: reading James Joyce’s dazzling, gorgeous, messy novel, Ulysses. The board at the Modern Library (among others) calls it the best novel of the twentieth century, which is a fitting vindication for a novel that was once put on trial in New York (in the 1934 case THE UNITED STATES vs. ONE BOOK CALLED ‘ULYSSES’). Ulysses depicts the ordinary lives of Leopold Bloom, Molly Bloom, and Stephen Dedalus on a single day in Dublin in 1904 (June 16th, Bloomsday, a day celebrated around the world each year with readings, re-enactments, and revelry). Joyce began his novel during the First World War by remaking Homer’s epic of homecoming, the Odyssey, to celebrate the value of the everyday lives of ordinary men and women. We read Ulysses alongside three precursor texts that will help us to better understand it: the Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. The course environment demands both serious intellectual engagement and a willingness to think in playful, creative ways. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4631. Toni Morrison. 3 cr. hrs.

Discover a literary and cultural giant, a Pulitzer and Nobel Prize winning national voice, who brought to the world the most complex, sophisticated, and trenchant analysis of how race, anti-Black racism, classism and misogyny shaped the history of the United States. Explore Morrison’s role in American literary history by studying her primary texts, both fictional and critical, within the social, historical, cultural and political contexts framing their production. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4710. Studies in Genre. 3 cr. hrs.

Advanced study of a particular genre and its ability to articulate meaning in historical, social and/or literary contexts. Offerings have included Romance and Epic in Early Modern England, the Family Novel, the Novella, the Epic, the Court Romance and the American Western. Consult Schedule of Classes or the English Department's website for specific topics. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4715. Children's Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

How does writing for children negotiate the boundaries between instruction and entertainment? How does it engage with controversial social issues? How is it situated in the broader currents of British and American cultural history? How is it gendered and classed? Students survey an array of texts written for children but compelling for adult readers too. Students are introduced to a range of critical approaches that reveal complexity, sophistication and surprises in these seemingly “simple” texts. Readings may include fairy tales, "Alice in Wonderland," "Little Women," "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," "Treasure Island," "Peter Pan", "The Secret Garden," "The Wind in the Willows," "Charlotte’s Web," and "Harry Potter," along with other classic as well as recent contributions. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4716. Science Fiction/Fantasy. 3 cr. hrs.

“Everything is becoming science fiction,” wrote J.G. Ballard in 1971. “From the margins of an almost invisible literature has sprung the intact reality of the 20th century.” What has been the role of speculative and fantastic media in anticipating and articulating social change? How have creators in science fiction and fantasy used the relative safety of these genres’ unreal situations to comment on very real crises in politics, identity, economics, ecology and war? How have science fiction and fantasy provided a space for reflection upon and resistance to dominant ideologies, and where have they served instead to reproduce and augment such powers? What role does the imagination of improbable and impossible worlds play in contemporary life? Content may range from surveys of different periods in the history of science fiction and fantasy to focused study of particular themes, subgenres and authors. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4717. Comics and Graphic Narrative. 3 cr. hrs.

Students explore the production and reception of comics and graphic narrative as a literary-artistic form, with topics ranging from the early history of the genre to its ongoing fixation on the figure of the superhero to the development of an international art movement crossing gender, class and ethnic lines. Texts discussed may include DC and Marvel superhero comics, manga and anime, "Watchmen," "Maus," "Persepolis," "Fun Home," "Gemma Bovary," "Buddha," "Understanding Comics," underground and alternative comics and "Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth." Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4720. Literary Criticism and Cultural Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of a wide variety of literary and critical methods ranging from New Criticism to the Frankfurt School to deconstruction to Cultural Studies to the digital humanities. Emphasis is on premises and strategies of criticism, exercises in practical criticism, and application of theory to analysis of literary works, as well as the question of the continued relevance of “theory” in an era that is now said to be “after theory.” Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4730. What Is a Book?. 3 cr. hrs.

Discover the history of reading and writing from the Mesopotamian tablet (3500 BCE) to the electronic tablet today. Explore the evolution of reading and writing technologies. Learn about Marquette’s rare books through trips to Raynor Library Special Collections and the Haggerty Museum of Art. Work hands-on with physical books. Read literary texts that exemplify the book’s evolution: stories written as letters, as comics, as Twitter feeds. Create a collaborative group project based around a rare book. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4734. The Epic. 3 cr. hrs.

Epic poetry is one of the oldest literary genres, and in the western literary tradition it has always been intimately associated with exploring the unknown—whether far-off oceans, the edges of the theological universe, or the dark territory of the self. Surveys four of the most important literary epics in the western tradition: Virgil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, Milton’s Paradise Lost and Barrett Browning’s Aurora Leigh. All four document how exploring distant realms always, at the end of the day, means exploring yourself. These epics ask their heroes where they came from and where they’re going as ways of forcing them to understand who they are. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4736. Fiction. 3 cr. hrs.

"There is no doubt," says Doris Lessing, "that fiction makes a better job of the truth." What is the connection between fiction and truth? Why are stories (narrative fictions) so compelling? Fiction takes a variety of forms, including the novel, the short story, the story cycle, the novella, the graphic novel, etc. New media has added to these in the forms of collaborative tales, fan fiction and hypertextual works, for examples. Students focus on one specific fictional form (topics vary by term) and study it in depth. Upon completing the course, students have a firm grasp of the form’s literary conventions, relation to the cultural/historical contexts of its production and ongoing reception, and relation to other literary genres. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4737. Creative Nonfiction. 3 cr. hrs.

Where does fact end and fiction begin? Sometimes referred to as the “literature of fact,” creative nonfiction blurs the line between literary art (poetry, fiction, and drama) and “objective” writing practices of research and reportage (history and journalism). Works of creative nonfiction have been galvanizing forces in the transformation of public opinion, influencing debates on the abolition of slavery, the environment, pacifism, women’s rights and more. Students explore different types of creative nonfiction including documentary, literary journalism, memoirs and other types of life-writing, and travel writing. Students engage creative nonfiction to explore ethical issues that might arise from practices of fictionalization including recent high-profile cases and controversies in the journalism and popular media. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4738. Poetry. 3 cr. hrs.

Students engage with the discipline and pleasure of poetry, from ancient sacred lyrics to twenty-first century experimental texts. The possibilities are endless: individual sections may focus on indigenous poetry of the Americas; on the poetry of witness; on feminist poetry; on long-form poetry; on ecopoetics; or on prosody; or on a particular “school” such as Deep Image, Black Arts or L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4739. Words to Worlds. 3 cr. hrs.

Read novels, stories, nonfiction that changed the world. Explore different traditions to understand the work stories do in the world socio-politically to respond to expose injustice and compel readers to respond. Understand how stories can help readers or listeners develop empathy, global awareness and vision of possible futures. Study at multiple levels how stories have transformed individuals and societies, empowering all for a more just world. Interrogate the productive and destructive impacts stories might have. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4745. Digital Literacies. 3 cr. hrs.

What does it mean to be literate in the age of digital natives? Students explore new media forms that have arisen since the mid-twentieth century, including video games, social media, digital music and art, and Internet writing. Students address questions such as: How can or should the study of literature and film include new media? How does the production and reception of different types of new media texts challenge our ideas about writing and reading? How do available technologies impact digital genres and forms? What theoretical constructs and aesthetic frameworks do they demand? And how are new media augmenting, challenging, or changing education, including university study? Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4755. Law and Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the centrality of law and justice to literature as well as the ways in which literature can help us think through legal questions and concerns. Considers topics such as the nature of law; the limits of legal authority; the legal construction of gender, race, and class; and the causes and consequences of crime and punishment. Authors may include Sophocles, Shakespeare, Melville, Dickens, Conan Doyle, and Atwood. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4762. Neuroscience and Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores a range of psychological, behavioral, and neurological conditions through careful reading of literature that represents neurodiversity. Examines how narratives about neurodiversity register the ongoing efforts of social and political movements to expand awareness about the lives of people whose minds and brains are not neurotypical. Reflects on ways to change social structures, especially in education and medicine, in order to make the world more inclusive of neurodifference. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4765. Material Cultures. 3 cr. hrs.

Shifts English studies off the page toward analysis of other sorts of objects, employing methodologies from history, anthropology, archaeology, museum studies and sociology alongside literary and linguistic methods and exploring the materiality of text and other methods of representation. Topics may range from the study of archives, museums, national parks and monuments to food, clothing, toys and games; to the history of the book; to investigation of Milwaukee architecture and historical sites. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4770. Studies in Literature and Culture. 3 cr. hrs.

Investigates the relation between literature and its culture from a variety of perspectives that might include the historical, political or anthropological. Past offerings have included the English Urban Novel, Catholicism and Literature, and Texts, Audiences and Social Change. Consult Schedule of Classes or the English Department's website for specific topic. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4785. Gender, Sexuality, Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Gender and sexuality can be identities, performances, prisons, or fields for exploration. They shape public and private experience – politics, economics, education, families, friendships, even one’s most personal relation to oneself. And literature is one of the central forums where writers and readers both make sense of this experience and imagine how it might be different. Students analyze changing literary representations of gender and sexuality and their intersections with other identities and categories of analysis – for instance, race and ethnicity, nationality, historical location – in order to explore the meaning and the function of these most basic building blocks in our culture. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4786. Women Writers. 3 cr. hrs.

Studies selected women writers to engage and explore the effect of women’s social/cultural positions on their literary aesthetics and whether women have separate and/or multiple literary traditions. Explores the literary innovations of women writers in order to connect their use of form to their social engagement. Authors studied vary by instructor. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4810. Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

Constructs a foundation for further study in the literatures of racialized and “ethnic” groups in the United States (e.g., African American, American Indian, Asian American, Chicana/o, Latina/o, Arab American, etc.). Presents key concepts necessary for more advanced work in comparative race and ethnic studies such as racial formation, varieties of privilege, intersectionality (of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, class, etc.), and settler colonialism, as well as literary theoretical concerns about the relationship between aesthetic form and content, the influence of historical and cultural contexts on literary production and reception, and the political role of literature in society. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4820. Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores selected topics in critical race and literary studies with the intent of allowing in-depth exploration and analysis. Topics vary by term but range from women of color feminism to Asian American literatures to literary captivities. Consult the Department of English website each term for specific topics. Though not required, having taken English 4810 is advantageous. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4825. Native American / Indigenous Literatures. 3 cr. hrs.

Understand the historical and legal contexts of tribal nations within the United States and Canada and why indigenous peoples are both politically and culturally distinct from other U.S. and Canadian citizens. Read such writers as Sherman Alexie, Charles Eastman and Louise Erdrich to learn Native critical terms and concepts elucidated through oral literature, non-fiction, poetry, short stories, film and novels, primarily drawn from members of tribal nations in the United States and Canada. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4826. Global Indigenous Literatures. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore literature from Indigenous peoples around the globe. Map the emergence of trans-indigenous methodologies, exploring the fine differences as well as the shared concerns expressed by various Indigenous peoples. Delve into the environmental protection policies and religious and human rights movements with which Indigenous peoples are currently and historically engaged. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4830. Africana Literatures. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores literature produced by people of African descent. Topics vary by term. Consult the Department of English website each term for specific topics. Offerings may include the Harlem Renaissance; the Great Migration; Caribbean literatures; Justice, the State and Citizenship; and Race/Literature in Milwaukee after WWII. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4840. Postcolonial Literatures. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores literatures written in English since the 1960s from Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and Great Britain. Discusses decolonization, the emergence of neocolonialism, and cultural imperialism, as well as literary responses to these issues. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4850. Global Literatures. 3 cr. hrs.

Students explore authors and texts that have become prominent on a global scale. Students read Anglophone texts as well as literary works in translation focusing on global economic, social and historical issues. Emphases and texts vary depending on instructor. Topics may include notions of universal human rights, migrant labor, issues of censorship and problems of literary translation. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4931. Topics in Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Topics vary according to instructor, but past offerings have included the Bible as Literature, Literary Responses to the Vietnam War, Literature and the Environment, Literature of the Holocaust, the Vikings, and Meaning and Identity. Consult the Schedule of Classes or the English Department's website for specific topics. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4932. Topics in Writing. 3 cr. hrs.

Students study writing topics that vary according to instructor. Consult Schedule of Classes or the English Department's website for specific topic. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4954. Seminar in Creative Writing. 3 cr. hrs.

To paraphrase the Czech writer Milan Kundera, most people would rather believe a simple lie than a complex truth. Students learn how to write complex truths, sometimes (often? mostly?) by making stuff up. Through advanced practice in the techniques and discipline of writing, students develop proficiency with those techniques they first encountered in ENGL 4250 and 4260 and add additional techniques to their repertoire. They examine fiction, poetry, drama, or nonfiction from technical (as well as critical) viewpoints, and develop fluency in discussing writing from the practitioner’s viewpoint. Offered in fiction, poetry, drama and nonfiction. Consult schedule of classes or the English department's website for specific genre. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H and cons. of instr.

ENGL 4986. Writing Internship. 3 cr. hrs.

On-the-job experience as writer and/or editor for a local agency; supervised by the agency and by English faculty. Although course is graded S/U, it counts toward the major or minor. May be taken only once. Guidelines and forms available in English department office. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4987. Internship in Publishing. 3 cr. hrs.

Professional experience in publishing, supervised by the publishing agency and by English faculty. Guidelines and forms are available in the English department. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H.

ENGL 4995. Independent Study in English. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Faculty-supervised, independent study/research of a specific area or topic in English. Independent studies are not normally allowed on material already addressed by other courses. Prereq: ENGL 1001 and HOPR 1955H, cons. of instr. and cons. of dept. ch.

ENGL 4997. Capstone. 3 cr. hrs.

Students draw together the knowledge and skills developed in previous course work in order to integrate knowledge and improve knowledge/skill transfer to post-university life. Students explore how key questions and concerns can be thought of in different ways by designing and producing projects as well as cultivating self-reflection. The focus of course content varies by instructor, and students should consult the Department of English website for information on specific sections before enrolling (http://www.marquette.edu/english/). Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H; ENGL 3000; and cons. of dept.

ENGL 4999. Senior Thesis. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Concentrated and independent study with a specific faculty member intended to allow the student to write a 40-60 page senior thesis on specific topic of interest to student. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H; ENGL 3000; cons. of instr. and cons. of dept. ch.

ENGL 4999H. Honors Senior Thesis. 3 cr. hrs.

Concentrated and independent study with a specific faculty member intended to allow the student to write a 40-60 page senior thesis on specific topic of interest to student. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: ENGL 1001 or HOPR 1955H; ENGL 3000; cons. of instr. and cons. of dept. ch.; admission to English Disciplinary Honors program.