Chairperson: Jessica Wolfendale, Ph.D.
Department of Philosophy website

The Marquette Philosophy department is a community of teachers and scholars who aim to enable students in all disciplines by developing interpretive, critical, analytical and communicative skills. We encourage personal, intellectual and moral development, cultural literacy and offer frameworks to deal with the complexities of life in the twenty-first century.

Philosophy is an investigation of the enduring questions facing humanity: What is the human being? How ought we to live? What is our relationship to the world around us and the transcendent? Philosophy also encourages students to be reflective. It asks students to critically evaluate their personal beliefs about self, communities and the world at large in light of varied intellectual traditions.  

In addition to its role in the Marquette Core Curriculum, the department offers a major with interest areas in the History of Philosophy; Social, Political and Legal Philosophy; Ethics and Values; and Philosophy of Science and Mind. The critical thinking and writing skills developed in the major are applicable to any subject matter and in any context. They are sought after by employers in many fields and help to explain why philosophy majors on average obtain the highest overall scores on the LSAT (Law School Admissions Test) and Graduate Record Exam (GRE) exams, and are able to find careers in many different fields.

Major in Philosophy

The major in philosophy consists of ten courses (30 credit hours), including three required courses (9 credit hours), and seven additional philosophy electives (21 credit hours).

Required Courses:
PHIL 1000Logic (PHIL 4000 recommended)3
or PHIL 4000 Modern Logic
PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
or PHIL 1001H Honors Foundations in Philosophy
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Electives:21
Theory of Ethics
Honors Theory of Ethics
Philosophy of the Environment
Philosophy of Art
Asian Philosophy
Latin American Philosophy
Metaphysics
Epistemology
Philosophy of Language
Philosophy of War and Peace
Narrating Freedom: Gender, Race and Mass Incarceration
The Ethics of Intimacy
Ethics and the Function of Reason in Human Life
Philosophy and Film
Philosophy of Race
Global Justice
Caribbean Philosophy
Ancient Philosophy
Medieval Philosophy
Pragmatism and American Philosophy
Twentieth Century Anglo-American Philosophy
Early Modern Philosophy
Marx and Marxism
Phenomenology and Existentialism
Nineteenth-Century German Philosophy
Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Philosophy and History of Crime and Punishment
Feminist Philosophy
Africana Philosophy
Modern Logic
Contemporary Ethical Problems
Business Ethics
Biomedical Ethics
Applied Ethics for the Health Sciences
Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy of Science
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy of Education
Topics in Philosophy
Undergraduate Seminar
Research in Philosophy
Independent Study
Senior Thesis
Honors Senior Thesis
Total Credit Hours30

Philosophy B.A./M.A. Accelerated Degree Program

The Department of Philosophy offers an accelerated degree program which allows students to earn both their B.A. degree and M.A. degrees in Philosophy within in a five-year time period. 

Those who have completed an M.A. in philosophy have gone on to excellent philosophy PhD programs or law schools, and gained employment in the non-profit and private sectors. Graduate courses in our program offer students the possibility to pursue topics of interest to them in more depth than they are able to in undergraduate classes. These courses couple smaller class sizes and more opportunities for participation with an emphasis on the refinement of student research skills.​

Students accepted into the program may transfer up to 12 credits of approved 5000-plus level courses into their graduate program. Undergraduates participating in this program are granted early admission to the graduate school and are allowed to take specific graduate-level courses during their junior and senior years.

To be considered for admission to the B.A./M.A. five-year program, applicants must formally apply to the philosophy department in their junior year at Marquette University and have achieved a minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.000.

For additional information about requirements contact the philosophy department.

Minor in Philosophy

The philosophy minor consists of seven courses (21 credit hours) including four required courses (12 credit hours) and three elective philosophy courses (9 credit hours) as listed below:

Required Courses:
PHIL 1000Logic3
or PHIL 4000 Modern Logic
PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
PHIL 2310Theory of Ethics3
PHIL 3410Metaphysics3
or PHIL 3450 Epistemology
Electives: Choose three philosophy courses9
Total Credit Hours21

 

Curricular Requirements

Seminar Series 13
Introduction to Honors in the Humanities
Developing a Humanities Honors Project and Writing a Research Proposal
Humanities Honors Project Seminar
One upper-division Philosophy course thematically paired by the student with:3
One upper-division course in another department 3
PHIL 4999HHonors Senior Thesis 23
Total Credit Hours12

Notes:

  • Two upper-level departmental courses, one in the student’s major and one that must be in another department are required. Each must be a 3-credit, graded course and must have the approval of the HiH director. These courses are normally taken during student’s junior year. The courses in the student’s major count toward total major credits and toward other major requirements where applicable. The course in another department does not count toward major requirements.
  • These two thematically paired courses are carefully chosen by the individual student to help them set a foundation for their independent research project.  Ideally these offer background, help the student develop new questions and allow for new perspectives on these questions.
  • Students may take these upper-level thematically paired courses concurrently or in different terms; they should have finished at least one before beginning their independent projects.  

Academic Standards

Students must have a 3.200 cumulative overall grade point average for entry into the Humanities Disciplinary Honors Program. Students must achieve a 3.200 cumulative grade point average in the above 12 credit hours required in order to graduate with Humanities Disciplinary Honors. Students who complete both Core Honors and Humanities Disciplinary Honors earn a Comprehensive Honors degree. Students must have a 3.200 cumulative GPA to graduate with this degree. Students admitted to Humanities Disciplinary Honors become part of the University Honors Program and are eligible for Honors research fellowships and Honors study-abroad scholarships. If an Honors student drops below a 3.200 in any given term during the junior year or any subsequent year, the student receives a letter of warning from the director. If a student drops below a 3.200 cumulative GPA, they are placed on University Honors Program academic probation; if they do not achieve a 3.200 cumulative GPA by the end of the following term, they are removed from the program. Students must earn a grade of C or better in all courses required for Humanities Disciplinary Honors and the Comprehensive Honors degree.

Additional Requirements:

  • The student must submit a written application to the program after HOPR 2954H but before HOPR 3954H that includes a description of the project they would like to pursue, a brief list of potential faculty mentors and another brief list of possible course pairings with explanations of how each might further develop the research plan. This application is be read by both the director and the appropriate disciplinary committee member.
  • A research proposal is produced in HOPR 3954H, for the PHIL 4999H thesis project that contains a reflection on the paired courses and how they have shaped the project--including the research questions, methodology and literature review. The student also has a mentor in place for the PHIL 4999H by the end of HOPR 3954H.
  • The final PHIL 4999H thesis project is graded by the disciplinary faculty mentor, but is also assessed by the appropriate HiH board member (eg: a thesis in History would be graded by the thesis director and then assessed by the History HiH board member on a S/U basis).
  • Presentation is an important component of research and as such students are required to present their work either at the end of the HOPR 4954H term or the following term. Ideally, the student presents their work at the Marquette University Undergraduate Humanities Conference if it is held in the spring term following the HOPR 4954H.

Eligibility

Humanities Disciplinary Honors is designed to be completed during students’ junior and senior years. Sophomores interested in pursuing Humanities Disciplinary Honors should enroll in HOPR 2954H during their sophomore year. Sophomores are eligible to apply to the program near the end of the spring term as long as they meet the 3.200 minimum cumulative GPA requirement.  

Application

Students are encouraged to apply following successful completion of HOPR 2954H, but applications are also accepted in the fall term of the junior year.  Students apply for admission to the Honors in the Humanities director. Application materials may be obtained by contacting kristen.foster@marquette.edu.

Courses

PHIL 1000. Logic. 3 cr. hrs.

The goal is to provide the student with an understanding of correct reasoning as it is employed in ordinary discourse. Studies topics such as: terms and propositions, definition, opposition, induction and deduction, reasoning and argumentation, fallacies in argument. Recommended to be taken as a freshman.

PHIL 1001. Foundations in Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

To help students critically engage their own experience as it relates to fundamental philosophical questions about the human condition, focusing on moral value and the meaning and purpose of human life. Aims to help students articulate their own deepest questions about these issues, and to increase their understanding of, organize and befriend these questions in light of a variety of classical and contemporary philosophical approaches.

PHIL 1001H. Honors Foundations in Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

To help students critically engage their own experience as it relates to fundamental philosophical questions about the human condition, focusing on moral value and the meaning and purpose of human life. Aims to help students articulate their own deepest questions about these issues, and to increase their understanding of, organize and befriend these questions in light of a variety of classical and contemporary philosophical approaches. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

PHIL 2310. Theory of Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

An investigation into the moral dimension of human life. Among the topics to be considered are the norms of morality and the general process of moral decision-making. Traditional natural law is one of the points of view included.

PHIL 2310H. Honors Theory of Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

An investigation into the moral dimension of human life. Among the topics to be considered are the norms of morality and the general process of moral decision-making. Traditional natural law is one of the points of view included. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

PHIL 3350. Philosophy of the Environment. 3 cr. hrs.

Philosophical inquiry into nature and our impact on it. Moral, scientific, and social problems posed by global environmental crises. Selected issues in value theory, ethics and aesthetics such asethical status of natural objects and systems, the morality of trade-offs between species, and the ethics of limiting consumption and population. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3370. Philosophy of Art. 3 cr. hrs.

Philosophical examination of art and its place in human life. Among possible topics are cognitive aspects of art, art and cultural understanding, the contribution of philosophy to the understanding and appreciation of art, the definition of art, art and morality, the objectivity of judgements of aesthetic value, the nature of aesthetic experience, the ontology of art, art as vehicle of social change, and the role of the artists' intentions in interpreting and evaluating works of art. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3380. Asian Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

The major systems of philosophy of India and China; early Vedic and Upanishadic systems, Buddhism including Chan/Zen, Brahmanism, Hinduism, Confucianism, and Daoism. Emphasis on the key ideas in Eastern philosophy. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3390. Latin American Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to significant figures, issues and texts in Latin American Philosophy. Investigates the global and comparative nature of philosophical dialogue and debate by reading texts from from philosophers and pensadores in Latin America, the Caribbean and the United States. Prereq: PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3410. Metaphysics. 3 cr. hrs.

Investigation of fundamental questions about the nature of reality, especially those not amenable to purely empirical resolution. Among possible topics are theories of substance, the nature of physical objects, the existence of the soul, essences and natural necessity, time and space, the reality of possible worlds, the existence of universals, the nature of causation, and the distinction between primary and secondary qualities. Prereq: Soph. stndg and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3450. Epistemology. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the sources, nature, structure and extent of knowledge and justified belief. Among possible topics are skepticism, theories of perception, a priori knowledge, testimony as a source of knowledge, theories of truth, internalist and externalist theories of knowledge, the analysis of knowledge and foundational and coherence theories of the structure of knowledge. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3460. Philosophy of Language. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of fundamental issues about the nature of symbolic systems, including language. Among the possible topics are intention-based, use-based, truthconditional and verificationalist theories of meaning, the indeterminacy of translation, proper names and reference, theories of definite descriptions, the nature of demonstrative and indexical expressions, and theories of metaphor. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3501. Philosophy of War and Peace. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines historical and contemporary ethical debates about the justification of war, the conduct of war and the means of fighting wars. Topics include just war theory, pacifism, terrorism, humanitarian intervention, war crimes, the privatization of war and the ethical implications of new military technologies. Prereq: PHIL 1001 and Soph. stndg.

PHIL 3502. Narrating Freedom: Gender, Race and Mass Incarceration. 3 cr. hrs.

Approaches some traditional philosophical questions in an experiential and interdisciplinary way and aims to bridge the gap between academic philosophy and everyday life. Through the lens of institutionalization and incarceration, explores questions regarding the nature of institutional oppression and different forms of freedom and resistance drawing from scholarly texts and from the social positions we live. The course partners with a Milwaukee community organization that supports currently or formerly incarcerated individuals and enrolls participants from the organization as students at MU. Prereq: PHIL 1001 and Soph. stndg.

PHIL 3503. The Ethics of Intimacy. 3 cr. hrs.

The study of ethics explores the relationship between self and others. Critically explores the relationship between individuals and communities as they construct notions of intimacy on both the local and global level. Specifically investigates the assemblages of intimacy as it intersects with various social positionalities: race, ethnicity, nationality, disability, migration, religion and sexuality. Prereq: PHIL 1001 and Soph. stndg.

PHIL 3504. Ethics and the Function of Reason in Human Life. 3 cr. hrs.

An investigation into the moral dimension of human life with special attention to how it pertains to other living beings, and the natural and human environments. Prereq: PHIL 1001 and Soph. stndg.

PHIL 3505. Philosophy and Film. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the relationship between philosophical ideas and film, especially narrative film. Discusses various accounts of the nature of film, film genres and ways of interpreting films. Attends to the ways that narrative films are susceptible to philosophical reflection and, more controversially, the way that narrative films might exemplify a way of doing philosophy.

PHIL 3506. Philosophy of Race. 3 cr. hrs.

Explore the role race and race related ideas (such as proto-race, ethnicity, nationality and indigeneity) play in how we define a diverse society and how individuals identify themselves. Examine the meaning of race from various philosophical perspectives. Explore the nature of race, xenophobia, anti-blackness, islamophobia and anti-semitism. Understand the nature of race in order to challenge racism and racial injustice.

PHIL 3507. Global Justice. 3 cr. hrs.

Issues of justice today are global in scope, yet our political institutions and theory focus on the state as the primary agency for ensuring justice. Focusing on five areas where questions of justice outstrip the resources of the nation-state students investigate these as problems of global justice. Explore the following areas: War and Violence, Human Rights, Development, and Global Institutions, Immigration and Refugees, Gender and Democracy and Communication.

PHIL 3508. Caribbean Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

Examine the rich intellectual tradition of the Caribbean oriented around issues of colonization, decolonization, resistance, emancipation and identity. Study transnational ideas forged in and through the Caribbean, including its diaspora. Consider the meaning of the Caribbean as a geopolitical space, understand how identities forged in the Caribbean, social and political problems emerge as a result of colonialism and globalization. Encounter major figures and philosophical problems around ethics, metaphysics and epistemology.

PHIL 3610. Ancient Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, from the pre-Socratic philosophers through the Hellenistic schools, with an emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Including other philosophers such as Heraclitus, Parmenides, Pythagoras, Plotinus, Epicurus, Seneca and Sextus Empiricus. Issues may include the soul, immorality, knowledge, eros, and fate and freedom. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3620. Medieval Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of selected issues and philosophers of the medieval period. Philosophers covered may include Augustine, Boethius, Averroes, Avicenna, Maimonides, Anselm, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus, and Ockham. Topics may include free will, universals, the nature of the soul, proofs for the existence of God, the relation of faith and reason. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3630. Pragmatism and American Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

Studies the development of Philosophy within the continental United States with special emphasis on the emergence of Pragmatism as an original philosophical response to new historical conditions. Issues can include rejecting the Cartesian quest for certainty and sharp dualisms between mind and body, fact and value, language and the world, self and society; the meaning of truth; the impact of the theory of evolution on views and persons, Nature and God. Readings from authors such as Pierce, Edwards, Emerson, Mead, Addams, Bradley, Brighton, James, Dewey, Royce and contemporaries such as Richard Rorty, Cornel West, Hilary Putnam, Donald Davidson, and Alain Locke. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3640. Twentieth Century Anglo-American Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

A critical examination of a number of 20th century Anglo-American philosophers and philosophic movements. Movements considered will include some of the following: "Common Sense" Philosophy, Logical Atomism, Logical Positivism, and Ordinary Language Philosophy. Philosophers treated may include G.E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wittgenstein, J.L. Austin, Elizabeth Anscombe, Willard Quine, Thomas Nagel, and Saul Kripke. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3650. Early Modern Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

Investigation of 17th-18th century philosophy, especially in light of individualism and scientific discovery. Philosophers may include, but not limited to, Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Themes may include theories of mind and matter, personal identity, God and the cosmos, and the relations amongst philosophy, science and religion. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3660. Marx and Marxism. 3 cr. hrs.

Marx's intellectual transition from "leftist" Hegelianism to dialectical materialism; and thence, from his study of political economics to Das Kapital. Developments and adaptations of Marx's thought as found in thinkers representative of various schools of Marx interpretation. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3665. Phenomenology and Existentialism. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of major figures and themes from phenomenological and existentialist traditions, such as Kierkegaard, Husserl, Heidegger, and Sartre. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3670. Nineteenth-Century German Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of the philosophical developments in Germany from the post-Kantian idealism of Fichte, Schelling and Hegel to the thought of Nietzsche. Authors may include figures such as Schopenhauer and Marx. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3710. Political Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

A philosophical inquiry into the nature of social and political life. May include topics such as the nature of political liberty, the relation between the individual and larger institutions such as the state, the nature of justice, human rights, the meaning of the individual as a social being, the social aspects of individual identity, and the legitimacy (or lack thereof) of the use of force. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3750. Philosophy of Law. 3 cr. hrs.

An inquiry into the nature and foundation of law, with particular attention to natural law, legal positivism and rights-based theories of law, theories of punishment and responsibility, and the relationship between law and morality. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3751. Philosophy and History of Crime and Punishment. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of crime and punishment from philosophical and historical perspectives. Crime and punishment from both the European and the American experience are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the interdisciplinary nature (philosophical/historical institutions) of crime and punishment. Same as HIST 3751 and CRLS 3751. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3770. Feminist Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

The history of philosophical views of women and a critical introduction to different types of feminism, e.g., liberal, existentialist, radical, Marxist and socialist feminism. Includes such topics as feminist theory of knowledge, political theory and ethics. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 3780. Africana Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to central philosophical issues and figures from Africa and the African Diaspora. Perennial issues in philosophy of human nature and social/political philosophy will be approached from an Africana perspective, and may include the ontological status of race, the nature of racism, the relation between race and personal identity, contemporary race relations, global feminism and the existence of a distinctly "African" philosophy. The course may include such authors as Zera Yacob, Kwame Appiah, WEB DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Frantz Fanon, Paget Henry, Sylvia Wynter, Angela Davis, Charles Mills, and Lewis Gordon. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4000. Modern Logic. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to modern symbolic logic, with primary emphasis on translation into symbolic form and natural deduction. Propositional logic and predicate logic with identity are covered.

PHIL 4320. Contemporary Ethical Problems. 3 cr. hrs.

Ethical considerations such as human rights and responsibilities in social and racial justice, war and international relations, expression of dissent, and sexual conduct. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4330. Business Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

An application of theories of ethics to the moral dimensions of business endeavors and their effects on individuals, organizations, and society. Selected topics may include issues of responsibility, discrimination and affirmative action in the workplace, whistle blowing, economic justice, environmental impact, and the effects of the "global economy." Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4335. Biomedical Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of fundamental ethical issues that arise in the practice of medicine and other health care professions. Among possible topics are the definition of death, the morality of suicide and euthanasia, patient-physician confidentiality, informed consent, refusal of lifesaving medical treatment, the morality of abortion, genetic engineering, human cloning, the allocation of scarce medical resources, and other issues involving health care and society. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4336. Applied Ethics for the Health Sciences. 1 cr. hr.

An introduction to issues in professional ethics for students in the College of Health Sciences. Course is designed to provide a bridge to ethical topics covered in professional phase of study. Topics include: dignity of life, codes of medical ethics; the nature of the patient-medical provider relationship; confidentiality, the determination of patient competence; critical patient care, and justice in health care. Prereq: Enrolled in Health Sciences, Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4450. Philosophy of Mind. 3 cr. hrs.

A consideration of some of the philosophical problems concerning the nature of mind and its interaction with the physical world. Topics may include the traditional mind-body problem and various significant historical and contemporary responses; the causal efficacy of content; neurophysiology vs. folk psychological approaches; other minds; intentionality; consciousness; and the reconciliation of contemporary science and our natural first person conception of the mind. Prereq: Soph stndg. or cons. of dept. ch.

PHIL 4470. Philosophy of Science. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of fundamental epistemological and metaphysical issues that arise in the practice of science. Among possible topics are theories of scientific method, problems of confirmation, models of scientific explanation, scientific revolutions, the observational-theoretical distinction, the reality of theoretical entities, the relation between science and religion, science and art, and the limits of scientific knowledge. Prereq: Soph. stndg., PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4510. Philosophy of Religion. 3 cr. hrs.

A philosophical inquiry into the nature and function of religious life. Topics which may be covered include: the nature of faith, belief, and religious experience, the role and meaning of religious practice, prayer and worship, God’s existence and attributes, divine foreknowledge, freewill and the problem of evil. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4540. Philosophy of Education. 3 cr. hrs.

Critical examination of important principles, methods and conclusions of various philosophies and their implications for education. Attention to professional ethics and students' development of their own philosophies of education. This course is equivalent to EDUC 4540. Prereq: Jr. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4931. Topics in Philosophy. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Lectures and discussions in an area which, because of its topicality, is not the subject of a regular course. The special topics will be designated in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: Jr. stndg. and PHIL 1001.

PHIL 4953. Undergraduate Seminar. 3 cr. hrs.

Designed to initiate a selected group of qualified undergraduates in the technique and discipline of scholarly research by concentrated work in a restricted field. Critical reading and analysis of sources. Specific subjects of seminars to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: PHIL 1001 and Jr. stndg.

PHIL 4960. Research in Philosophy. 3 cr. hrs.

Draws upon prior coursework in philosophy and integrates both the factual knowledge and the arts of philosophical reasoning and research developed in prior courses culminating in a substantive research project. Prereq: Jr. stndg. and Cons. of dept. ch.

PHIL 4995. Independent Study. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Jr. stndg., PHIL 1001, and cons. of dept. ch.

PHIL 4999. Senior Thesis. 3 cr. hrs.

Preparation of a thesis by approved students under direction of an adviser. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHIL 4999H. Honors Senior Thesis. 3 cr. hrs.

Preparation of a thesis by approved students under direction of an adviser. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Philosophy Disciplinary Honors Program.