Chairperson: Brian Bennett, D.Phil.
Department of Physics website

The Physics department at Marquette offers three majors that prepare students for graduate study, employment, professional training and diversification into a variety of other fields that require rigor and a combination of creative and analytical skills. The majors offered are Physics, Biophysics and Applied Physics. Physics students achieve a general understanding of leading edge computational, theoretical and experimental approaches to explaining diverse natural phenomena from sub atomic particles, to exotic stars and galaxies, and progress into areas as diverse as medicine, law, engineering and finance, as well as mainstream areas of physics such as particle physics, astrophysics, solid state, atomic and molecular physics. Biophysics students learn about the structures and mechanisms of living systems at the chemical, molecular, atomic and electronic levels, and become familiar with the techniques and instrumentation with which to study these. The Biophysics major is a rigorous preparation for a career in medicine or in the rapidly growing biomedical industry, or for further study and research in biophysical and biomedical sciences. Applied Physics students study a core physics curriculum along with practical and engineering techniques and applications, and carry out an intensive research or work-study program, in preparation for employment, specialist vocational training or further specialized study. Majors in the Physics department can apply for acceptance into the Disciplinary Honor Program in Physics near the end of their sophomore year. Completion of this experiential program involves six credits of independent research with a faculty member and enrollment in an accompanying seminar focused on the research skills typically found in successful scientists. Minors are offered in Physics, Astrophysics and Biophysics. In addition, together with the Graduate School of Management, the Department of Physics offers a five-year B.S./M.B.A. accelerated degree program.

 

Major in Physics

The major in physics consists of thirty-six (36) credit hours. Students complete the common physics core: one required physics core sequence of two courses (8 credit hours), five required physics core courses (15 credit hours), and six required physics seminar courses (7 credit hours). In addition, six (6) credit hours of upper division physics elective courses are required, for a total of 36 credit hours in the major. Physics majors must also complete four required mathematics courses (16 credit hours) and cognate studies in chemistry or computer science courses (8 credit hours) for a total of 24 credit hours of background course work.

Common Physics Core:
Required Physics Core Sequence - Choose one of the following:8
General Physics 1
and General Physics 2
General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
and General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1
and Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2
Required Physics Core Courses:
PHYS 2400The Microscopic World3
PHYS 2500Oscillations and Waves with Laboratory4
PHYS 3100Classical Mechanics3
PHYS 3056Contemporary Physics Lab 12
PHYS 4031Electricity and Magnetism 13
Required Seminar Courses:
PHYS 1953Discovering Physics1
PHYS 1954Communicating Physics1
PHYS 2953Computational Methods in Physics1
PHYS 2954Participating in Physics1
PHYS 4954Review and Preparation for Post-Graduate Life1
PHYS 4997Physics Exploration Capstone2
Electives - Upper-division Physics courses6
Total Credit Hours36

Note:

  • PHYS 1013 Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1 and PHYS 1014 Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2 are studio style courses recommended for students considering a physics major.
Required Background Mathematics and Chemistry or Computer Science Courses:
Mathematics Courses:
MATH 1450Calculus 14
MATH 1451Calculus 24
MATH 2450Calculus 34
MATH 2451Differential Equations4
Chemistry or Computer Science Courses:8
Total Credit Hours24

Typical Program for Physics Majors

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PHYS 1013 (recommended)4PHYS 1014 (recommended)4
PHYS 19531PHYS 19541
MATH 14504MATH 14514
ENGL 1001 or ESSV1 (MCC)3ENGL 1001 or ESSV1 (MCC)3
PHIL 1001 or THEO 1001 (MCC)3PHIL 1001 or THEO 1001 (MCC)3
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PHYS 24003PHYS 25004
PHYS 29541PHYS 29531
MATH 24504MATH 24514
CHEM/COSC Cognate course4CHEM/COSC Cognate course4
CORE 1929 (MCC)3DCSV (MCC)1, 23
 15 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PHYS 31003PHYS 40313
PHYS 40123PHYS 30562
DSCV (MCC)1, 23DSCV (MCC)1, 23
Electives6Elective6
 15 14
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PHYS 40572PHYS 40343
PHYS 49541PHYS 49972
Physics electives (upper division)6Physics electives (upper division)6
CORE 4929 (MCC)3Electives4
DSCV (MCC)1,23 
 15 15
Total credit hours: 120

Note:
Physics Electives: A minimum of 8 credits of upper division physics courses (3000 and above) are required. Courses may range from 1 credit hour to 3 credit hours.

For Students Considering Graduate Study in Physics

To meet admission expectations for graduate study in physics, students should complete the following recommended upper division elective curriculum for graduate study in physics as listed below. Physics majors must also complete required physics core sequence (8 credit hours), physics core courses (15 credit hours), and physics seminar courses (7 credit hours), as well as the background course work in mathematics (16 credit hours) and chemistry/computer science (8 credit hours) courses listed under the physics major. This list is guidance for elective choices, not a replacement for the major requirements above.

Recommended Upper Division Electives for Graduate Study in Physics:
Physics Courses:
PHYS 4012Quantum Mechanics3
PHYS 4034Modern Optics3
PHYS 4057Contemporary Physics Lab 22
PHYS 4062Introduction to Thermodynamics3
Mathematics Course:
MATH 4210Complex Variables3
Additional Course: 3 credit hours in upper-division MATH3
Total Credit Hours17

Physics B.S./M.B.A. Accelerated Degree Program

The Department of Physics together with the Graduate School of Management offers an accelerated degree program which allows students to earn both their B.S. in physics and master of business administration (M.B.A.) all within in a five-year time period.

During the first four years of the program, students complete both their course work requirements for their physics B.S. degree and the necessary prerequisite courses for the M.B.A. degree in the College of Business Administration. In addition, undergraduate students begin their M.B.A. graduate work in their senior year by taking two graduate level courses.

To be considered for admission to the B.S./M.B.A. five-year program, applicants must formally apply to the Graduate School of Management during their junior year at Marquette University. For more detailed information and details of a typical five-year course work plan, refer to the Graduate School of Management Bulletin and contact the Department of Physics or the Graduate School of Management.


 

Major in Biophysics

The major in biophysics consists of 51 credit hours. Students complete the common physics core: one required physics core sequence of two courses (8 credit hours), four required physics core courses (13 credit hours), and three required physics seminar courses (3 credit hours); one required biology core sequence (6 credit hours), and three required biology courses (9 credit hours); six credit hours of approved physics electives from Group A and six additional credit hours of approved upper division electives (12 credit hours) in either biology, chemistry, mathematics or physics, taken from Groups A and B, listed below. In addition, students complete four required mathematics courses (16 credit hours), and four required chemistry courses (16 credit hours) for a total of 32 credit hours of background course work.

Common Biophysics Core:

Required Physics Core:
Choose one sequence of the following (PHYS 1013 / PHYS 1014 are recommended):8
General Physics 1
and General Physics 2
General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
and General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1
and Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2
PHYS 2400The Microscopic World3
PHYS 2500Oscillations and Waves with Laboratory4
PHYS 4046The Physical Basis of Biological Structure and Function3
PHYS 4065Experimental Methods in Molecular Biophysics3
Required Physics Seminar Courses:
PHYS 1953Discovering Physics1
PHYS 1954Communicating Physics1
PHYS 2954Participating in Physics1
Required Biology Core:
BIOL 1001
BIOL 1002
General Biology 1
and General Biology 2
6
BIOL 3301Cell Biology3
BIOL 3101Biochemistry and the Molecular Basis of Biology3
BIOL 4102Experimental Molecular Biology3
or BIOL 4302 Experimental Cell Biology
Electives: Upper-division courses in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics from the list of recommended electives below.12
Total Credit Hours51

Note: PHYS 1013 Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1 and PHYS 1014 Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2 are studio style courses recommended for students considering a physics major.

Biophysics Major Recommended Electives:

The major requires 12 credit hours of electives which should be drawn from these lists as follows: 6 credit hours of approved upper division electives in physics must be taken from Group A; six additional credit hours of approved upper division electives in biology, chemistry, mathematics or physics must be taken from courses in either Group A or Group B. Any exceptions must be approved by the Physics Department.

Group A:

PHYS 3100Classical Mechanics3
PHYS 4012Quantum Mechanics3
PHYS 4031Electricity and Magnetism 13
PHYS 4032Electricity and Magnetism 23
PHYS 4034Modern Optics3
PHYS 4062Introduction to Thermodynamics3
PHYS 4071Atomic Physics3

Group B:

PHYS 2953Computational Methods in Physics 11
PHYS 4956Undergraduate Research in Physics 21-3
BIEN 4500Medical Imaging Physics3
BIOL 3201Genetics3
BIOL 4102Experimental Molecular Biology3
BIOL 4202Experimental Genetics3
BIOL 4302Experimental Cell Biology3
BIOL 4501Cellular Neurobiology3
BIOL 4502Experimental Neurobiology3
BIOL 4701Human Physiology4
BIOL 4702Experimental Physiology3
BIOL 4956Laboratory Research Project in Biological Sciences 21-3
BIOL 8101Protein Structure and Function 32
BIOL 8102Biochemistry and Function of Nucleic Acids 32
BIOL 8506Cellular Neurophysiology 32
CHEM 4431Physical Chemistry: Fundamentals with Applications in Biological Sciences3
CHEM 4433Physical Chemistry 13
CHEM 4434Physical Chemistry 23
CHEM 4530Biochemistry 1: Macromolecular Structure and Function3
CHEM 4956Undergraduate Research in Chemistry 21-3
MATH 4740Biostatistical Methods and Models3

Required Background Mathematics and Chemistry Courses:

Math Courses:
MATH 1450
MATH 1451
Calculus 1
and Calculus 2
8
MATH 2450Calculus 34
MATH 2451Differential Equations4
Chemistry Courses:
CHEM 1001
CHEM 1002
General Chemistry 1
and General Chemistry 2
8
CHEM 2111
CHEM 2112
Organic Chemistry 1
and Organic Chemistry 2
8
Total Credit Hours32

Typical Program for Biophysics Majors

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIOL 10013BIOL 10023
CHEM 10014CHEM 10024
PHYS 1001, 1003, or 101314PHYS 1002, 1004, or 101414
ENGL 1001 or ESSV1 (MCC)3ENGL 1001 or ESSV1 (MCC)3
PHYS 19531PHYS 19541
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIOL 33013CHEM 21124
CHEM 21114MATH 14514
MATH 14504CORE 1929 (MCC)3
PHIL 1001 or THEO 1001 (MCC)3PHIL 1001 or THEO 1001 (MCC)3
 14 14
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIOL 31013MATH 24514
MATH 24504BIOL 4102 or 43023
PHYS 24003PHYS 25004
PHYS 29531PHYS 29541
PHYS 40313DSCV (MCC)2, 33
DSCV (MCC)2, 33DSCV (MCC)2, 33
 17 18
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
PHYS 40463PHYS 40653
Group A elective43Group A elective 43
Group A or B elective 53Group A or B elective53
CORE 4929 (MCC)3Electives7
DSCV (MCC)2, 33 
 15 16
Total credit hours: 124

Major in Applied Physics

The major in applied physics consists of up to 48 credit hours. Students complete a physics core consisting of: an introductory physics sequence of two courses (8 credit hours); five required physics courses covering electromagnetism, modern physics, mechanics and thermodynamics (15 credit hours); four required physics seminar courses (4 credit hours); computer programming (3-4 credit hours); and laboratories in contemporary techniques and in electronics (4 credit hours). Students are required to complete 9-12 credit hours of engineering course work consisting of a course or sequence in circuits (3-6 credit hours) and engineering electives (6 credit hours, including 3 credit hours of upper division electives). In certain cases, formal prerequisites for the Engineering elective courses can be waived with (a) prior approval from the Engineering Advising Center, and (b) concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2929 Applied Physics Bridge to Engineering. Applied Physics students should consult with their academic advisers and the Engineering Advising Center for permission to enroll in these courses. Either a research project in applied physics or cooperative work-study experience is required, typically carried out full-time over two summer terms. Additional physics, engineering, chemistry, computing, math, biology or other elective courses may be taken to fulfill the overall requirements for the B.S. degree and/or the prerequisite requirements for some upper division electives.

Required Courses
PHYS 1003
PHYS 1004
General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
and General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
8
or PHYS 1013
PHYS 1014
Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1
and Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2
Physics Seminar Courses 14
Discovering Physics
Communicating Physics
Computational Methods in Physics
Participating in Physics
Engineering Required Courses
EECE 1610Introduction to Computer Programming3-4
or COSC 1010 Introduction to Software Development
EECE 2010
EECE 2030
Electric Circuits 1
and Digital Electronics
3-6
or ELEN 3001 Electric Circuits and Machinery
Physics Required Courses
PHYS 2400The Microscopic World3
PHYS 2500Oscillations and Waves with Laboratory4
PHYS 3100Classical Mechanics3
PHYS 3056Contemporary Physics Lab 12
PHYS 4031Electricity and Magnetism 13
PHYS 4062Introduction to Thermodynamics3
Applied Physics Immersion Experiences
PHYS 3989
PHYS 4989
Applied Physics Immersion Experience 1
and Applied Physics Immersion Experience 1 - Grading Period
1
PHYS 3990
PHYS 4990
Applied Physics Immersion Experience 2
and Applied Physics Immersion Experience 2 - Grading Period
1
Engineering Electives (At least 3 credits must be 3000 or 4000 level)6
Total Credit Hours44-48
Recommended Engineering Electives - Engineering electives should be chosen with the assistance of your major adviser and may include the following:
GEEN 2130Mechanics of Materials3
MEEN 3210Measurements and Controls3
MEEN 3320Fluid Mechanics3
EECE 3010Electronic Devices and Applications3
EECE 4510Digital Signal Processing3
ELEN 2020Electric Circuits 23
ELEN 3020Linear Systems Analysis3
ELEN 3210Electric Drives3
ELEN 4110Microwave Engineering3
ELEN 4310Control Systems3

TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR APPLIED PHYSICS MAJOR

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours 
MATH 14504MATH 14514 
ENGL 1001 or ESSV1 (MCC)3ENGL 1001 or ESSV1 (MCC)3 
PHIL 1001 or THEO 1001 (MCC)3PHIL 1001 or THEO 1001 (MCC)3 
PHYS 1003 or 10134PHYS 1004 or 10144 
PHYS 19531PHYS 19541 
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHoursSummer TermHours
EECE 1610 or COSC 10103MATH 24514PHYS 39890
MATH 24504PHYS 25004 
PHYS 24003PHYS 29541 
PHYS 29531DSCV (MCC)1, 23 
CORE 1929 (MCC)3Elective3 
Elective3  
 17 15 0
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHoursSummer TermHours
PHYS 31003PHYS 40323PHYS 39900
PHYS 30562EECE 2030 (or Elective)3 
PHYS 40313Engineering elective - 2000+ level3 
PHYS 49891Upper-division Physics elective3 
EECE 2010 or ELEN 30013DSCV (MCC)1, 23 
DSCV (MCC)1, 23  
 15 15 0
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours 
PHYS 49901PHYS 40623 
PHYS 49541Electives6 
Engineering Elective - 3000+ level3CORE 4929 (MCC)3 
Electives6PHYS 49972 
DSCV (MCC)1, 23  
 14 14
Total credit hours: 120

Minor in Physics

The minor in physics consists of a total of 20 credit hours: one required physics sequence (8 credit hours) and 12 credit hours in physics elective courses as listed below:

Required Physics Sequence: Choose one of the following:8
General Physics 1
and General Physics 2
General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
and General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1
and Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2
Electives: Choose 12 credit hours of Physics courses12
Total Credit Hours20

Department of Public Instruction Certification

To pursue Department of Public Instruction certification, College of Education students should complete the following requirements which consist of a total of 22 credit hours: one required physics sequence (8 credit hours), three required physics courses (10 credit hours) and 4 credit hours in physics elective courses as listed below:

Required Physics Sequence: Choose one of the following:8
General Physics 1
and General Physics 2
General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
and General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1
and Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2
Required Physics Courses:
PHYS 1009Earth and Environmental Physics3
PHYS 2400The Microscopic World3
PHYS 2500Oscillations and Waves with Laboratory4
Electives: Choose 4 credit hours of Physics courses4
Total Credit Hours22

Minor in Astronomy

The Astronomy Minor is intended for students who are interested in learning about modern astronomy and astrophysics.

NON-PHYSICS MAJORS: the minor in astronomy requires one introductory physics sequence (8 credit hours) and four required physics courses (12 credit hours) for a total of 20 credit hours as listed below:

Required Physics Sequence - Choose one of the following:8
General Physics 1
and General Physics 2
General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
and General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1
and Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2
Required Courses:
PHYS 1008Astronomy and Space Physics3
PHYS 2400The Microscopic World3
PHYS 3021Introduction to Theoretical Astrophysics3
PHYS 3022Introduction to Observational Astronomy3
Total Credit Hours20

Note:

  • Students who complete PHYS 1001 General Physics 1 and PHYS 1002 General Physics 2 must also take the math requisites for PHYS 1003 General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1 and PHYS 1004 General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2 (MATH 1450 Calculus 1 and MATH 1451 Calculus 2) in order to meet the mathematics level of PHYS 3021 Introduction to Theoretical Astrophysics and PHYS 3022 Introduction to Observational Astronomy.

PHYSICS MAJORS: the minor in astronomy requires the following, taken under the guidance of one of our astronomy/astrophysics faculty with a topic being in the realm of astronomy or astrophysics. Note: If the PHYS 4931 Topics in Contemporary Physics course is used for the astronomy minor requirement, it may not then be used for a physics major elective course requirement. The astronomy minor for a physics major requires a total of 12 credit hours beyond the physics major requirements. The required introductory physics sequence is completed as part of the physics major requirements.

Required Physics Sequence - Choose one of the following:8
General Physics 1
and General Physics 2
General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
and General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1
and Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2
Required Courses:
PHYS 1008Astronomy and Space Physics3
PHYS 3021Introduction to Theoretical Astrophysics3
PHYS 3022Introduction to Observational Astronomy3
Choose one of the following:3
Modern Optics
Experimental Methods in Molecular Biophysics
Introduction to Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics
Topics in Contemporary Physics
Total Credit Hours20

Minor in Biophysics

Biophysics is concerned with the application of the concepts and methods of physics to the solution of biological problems and to the understanding of biological processes. Students who complete the biophysics minor achieve a grasp of physics as it relates to solving biological problems, a general understanding of the nature of biological problems and of proteins and cell membranes in particular and of several techniques based on physics principles that are used in biological investigations.

Cognate requirements for the minor are one year each of introductory biology and introductory chemistry as follows:

Cognate Course Requirements:
Required Biology Sequence:6
General Biology 1
and General Biology 2
Required Chemistry Sequence:8
General Chemistry 1
and General Chemistry 2
Total Credit Hours14

Biophysics Minor Course Requirements:

Required Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Choose one of the following.2-8
Organic Chemistry 1
and Organic Chemistry 2
or
Organic Chemistry for Majors 1
and Organic Chemistry for Majors 2
or
Organic Chemistry for the Health Sciences
Required Differential and Integral Calculus: Choose one of the following.3-4
Calculus for the Biological Sciences
Calculus 1
Required Physics Sequence: Choose one of the following sequences.8
General Physics 1
and General Physics 2
General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
and General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1
and Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2
Physics Course Requirements:
PHYS 4046The Physical Basis of Biological Structure and Function (or equivalent by consent of Physics Dept)3
PHYS 4065Experimental Methods in Molecular Biophysics3
PHYS 4956Undergraduate Research in Physics 13
Total Credit Hours22-29

Disciplinary Honors in Physics

Program Director: Dr. Andrew Kunz

Curriculum Requirements

Recommended Prerequisites:

PHYS 1013HHonors Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 14
or PHYS 1003H Honors General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1
PHYS 1014HHonors Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 24
or PHYS 1004H Honors General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2
Total Credit Hours8

Requirements for Physics Disciplinary Honors:

PHYS 4953HHonors Seminar in Physics1
PHYS 4956HHonors Undergraduate Research6
  • Students are expected to enroll in PHYS 4953H during the fall term of the junior year.
  • The 6 credits of PHYS 4956H must be taken over at least two terms.

ELIGIBILITY

  1. Overall cumulative GPA of 3.200 or higher at time of application. 
  2. Written statement – In a written statement (1-2 pages), the student should summarize his/her reasons for applying to the honors program. In addition, the statement should address the student’s plans with respect to undergraduate research and career objectives.

APPLICATION

Students are encouraged to apply to the disciplinary honors program in physics during the spring term of their sophomore year. Applications may also be accepted in the fall term of the junior year in rare cases. Applications should be submitted directly to the physics department office. Sample statements, application deadlines and forms are available on the Department of Physics Web page. Additional questions can be directed to the disciplinary honors director, Dr. Andrew Kunz. The program director evaluates applications and makes decisions regarding admission to the program.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

If a student drops below a 3.200 in any given term during the junior year or any subsequent year, the student receives a letter of warning from the director. If a student drops below a 3.200 cumulative GPA, they are placed on Honors Program academic probation; if they do not achieve a 3.200 cumulative by the end of the following term, they are removed from the program. Students must earn a grade of C or better in a course for it to count toward the disciplinary honors requirements.

Courses

PHYS 1001. General Physics 1. 4 cr. hrs.

Newton's laws, linear motion, circular and harmonic motion, fluids, heat, kinetic theory, wave motion and sound. 4 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab. Prereq: High school algebra, geometry, and trigonometry or equivalent.

PHYS 1002. General Physics 2. 4 cr. hrs.

Continuation of PHYS 1001. Electrostatics, DC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, light, optical instruments, interference and diffraction of light, modern physics. 4 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab. Prereq: PHYS 1001.

PHYS 1003. General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1. 4 cr. hrs.

Survey of classical physics for science and engineering majors. Kinematics in one and two dimensions. Newton's laws of motion and dynamics, including rotation of rigid bodies. Energy concepts in physical systems, harmonic motion and thermodynamics with applications. A command of high school algebra, geometry and trigonometry is assumed. Requires the use of introductory calculus. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab., 1 hr. dis. Prereq: MATH 1450 which, may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 1003H. Honors General Physics with Introductory Calculus 1. 4 cr. hrs.

Survey of classical physics for science majors and engineering majors. Kinematics in one and two dimensions. Newton's laws of motion and dynamics, including rotation of rigid bodies. Energy concepts in physical systems, harmonic motion and thermodynamics with applications. A command of high school algebra, geometry and trigonometry is assumed. Requires the use of introductory calculus. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 1003 and PHYS 1013 or PHYS 1013H. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: MATH 1450, which may be taken concurrently; admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

PHYS 1004. General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2. 4 cr. hrs.

A continuation of PHYS 1003. A survey of classical electromagnetic theory, with an introduction to modern physics. Electricity and magnetism: Coulomb's law, Gauss' law, the electric field and the electric potential, circuits, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, electromagnetic waves. Classical and quantum waves, interference, optics. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab., 1 hr. dis. Prereq: MATH 1450; PHYS 1001 or PHYS 1003 or PHYS 1013; MATH 1451 or MATH 1455, which may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 1004H. Honors General Physics with Introductory Calculus 2. 4 cr. hrs.

A continuation of PHYS 1003. A survey of classical electromagnetic theory, with an introduction to modern physics. Electricity and magnetism: Coulomb's law, Gauss' law, the electric field and the electric potential, circuits, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, electromagnetic waves. Classical and quantum waves, interference, optics. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 1004 and PHYS 1014 or PHYS 1014H. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: MATH 1450; PHYS 1001, PHYS 1003, PHYS 1003H, PHYS 1013 or PHYS 1013H; MATH 1451 or MATH 1455, which may be taken concurrently; admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

PHYS 1007. Survey of Meteorology. 3 cr. hrs.

An introduction to the science of the atmosphere as it relates to the weather of the earth, including important environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution. Topics include: atmospheric gasses, heat transfer, causes of the seasons, humidity, clouds, atmospheric stability and motions, air masses, fronts, and pressure systems, thunderstorms, tornados, hurricanes and weather forecasting.

PHYS 1008. Astronomy and Space Physics. 3 cr. hrs.

Physics of the solar system, stars, galaxies and the universe. Experimental methods of observational astronomy, telescopes, and space probes. Special topics such as black holes, neutron stars and quasars are covered. Satisfies the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum Natural Science requirement.

PHYS 1009. Earth and Environmental Physics. 3 cr. hrs.

Impact of human activities on the environment, especially the consumption of fossil fuels. Population distribution and growth. Energy balance of the earth. Energy, land and water use, the water cycle. Effects of chemical and physical pollutants on water and the atmosphere. Course designed for non-science majors. Satisfies the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum Natural Science requirement.

PHYS 1013. Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1. 4 cr. hrs.

A study of motion in its various forms, translational, rotational, and vibrational, that emphasizes their underlying unity, especially the central role of energy and its conservation, and their basis in the fundamental Newtonian laws of motion and Einstein's special relativity. These ideas are used to explain thermal processes. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab., 1 hr. quiz. Prereq: MATH 1450, which may be taken concurrently. A command of high school algebra, geometry, trigonometry is assumed. Requires the use of introductory calculus. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 1003 and PHYS 1013.

PHYS 1013H. Honors Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 1. 4 cr. hrs.

A study of motion in its various forms, translational, rotational, and vibrational, that emphasizes their underlying unity, especially the central role of energy and its conservation, and their basis in the fundamental Newtonian laws of motion and Einstein's special relativity. These ideas are used to explain thermal processes. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab., 1 hr. quiz. Prereq: MATH 1450, which may be taken concurrently. A command of high school algebra, geometry, trigonometry is assumed. Requires the use of introductory calculus. Admission to Marquette University Honors Program. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 1003 and PHYS 1013 or PHYS 1013H.

PHYS 1014. Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2. 4 cr. hrs.

Continuation of PHYS 1013. Examines the development of energy as a fundamental concept, includes a study of electric and magnetic phenomena and their unification in the theory of electromagnetism. Applications are made to waves, geometric and physical optics, atomic spectra, and nuclear decay and introductory quantum mechanics including wave function and bound systems. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab., 1 hr. quiz. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 1004 and PHYS 1014. Prereq: MATH 1450, MATH 1451 or MATH 1455, which may be taken concurrently; and PHYS 1001, PHYS 1003 or PHYS 1013.

PHYS 1014H. Honors Classical and Modern Physics with Calculus 2. 4 cr. hrs.

Continuation of PHYS 1013H. Examines the development of energy as a fundamental concept, includes a study of electric and magnetic phenomena and their unification in the theory of electromagnetism. Applications are made to waves, geometric and physical optics, atomic spectra, and nuclear decay and introductory quantum mechanics including wave function and bound systems. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. lab., 1 hr. quiz. Students cannot receive credit for both PHYS 1004 and PHYS 1014 or PHYS 1014H. Prereq: MATH 1450, MATH 1451 or MATH 1455, which may be taken concurrently; and PHYS 1001, PHYS 1003, PHYS 1013 or PHYS 1013H. Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

PHYS 1020. Physics Laboratory Only. 1 cr. hr.

Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHYS 1030. Physics Lecture Only. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHYS 1953. Discovering Physics. 1 cr. hr.

An introduction to the department and the myriad career possibilities a degree in physics opens up to a student. This includes what the student groups do and why they're useful, what careers are available to physics majors, talks from faculty members about their research, tours of sites in industry that have internships available for physics students and attendance at department colloquia.

PHYS 1954. Communicating Physics. 1 cr. hr.

An introduction to scientific literature and literature searches. Students read, present, discuss and write overviews about journal articles and special topics. These topics could include general interest, breaking research and science ethics articles. Requires attendance at the department colloquia.

PHYS 2004. Modern Physics: Atoms, Particles, and Quanta. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of 20th century physics concentrating on atoms and particles. Quantum mechanics: origins, the Schrodinger equation, the hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms and angular momentum. Introduction to special relativity. Nuclear structure, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fission and fusion. Elementary particles, conservation laws, reactions, the Standard Model, and cosmology. Prereq: MATH 2450 and PHYS 1002; MATH 2450 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 2450 and PHYS 1014. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 2005. Modern Physics: The States of Matter. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of the physics of matter and materials. Atoms and the forces between them, molecules, the states of matter, kinetic theory, perfect and imperfect gases. Statistical physics: classical statistics and the Boltzmann factor, quantum statistics. The solid state: cohesion and structure, electrical, magnetic, thermal and elastic properties. The liquid state: cohesion and structure, latent heat and melting, flow in ideal and real liquids. Prereq: MATH 2450 and PHYS 1002; MATH 2450 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 2450 and PHYS 1014. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 2055. Electronics Lab. 2 cr. hrs.

Introduction to electronic measuring equipment and circuits. Voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters, oscilloscopes, DC and AC circuits, resistance, impedance, passive and active filters, power supplies, op-amps, amplifiers, and analog-digital conversion. An introduction to error analysis and precision of measurement. 1 hr. lec., 3 hrs. lab. Prereq: PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1014.

PHYS 2400. The Microscopic World. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey, including applications, of quantum mechanics including the 1-D Schrodinger equation, the hydrogen atom and angular momentum. Atoms and the forces between them, molecules, the states of matter, kinetic theory, perfect and imperfect gases. Statistical physics: classical statistics and the Boltzmann factor, quantum statistics. Prereq: MATH 2450; PHYS 1002, PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1014; any of which may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 2500. Oscillations and Waves with Laboratory. 4 cr. hrs.

A comprehensive study of mechanical and electromagnetic oscillators and waves as understood with ordinary differential equations. Application includes the simple harmonic oscillator, driven/damped systems and coupled oscillators, scattering-interference/diffraction. Matrix methods, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, normal modes, complex variables, Fourier transformations. Prereq: PHYS 1002 or PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1014; PHYS 2400; MATH 2451, which may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 2929. Applied Physics Bridge to Engineering. 1 cr. hr.

Taken concurrently with approved courses offered by the Opus College of Engineering. With permission, a student may take this course in lieu of the prerequisite for the paired Engineering course. Addresses missing prerequisite content. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

PHYS 2953. Computational Methods in Physics. 1 cr. hr.

Designed to teach students to perform relevant computational tasks using Matlab. This software is used to solve computational physics problems, analyze experimental data, perform error analysis and create graphs and figures in a style appropriate for publication. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 2400, recommended.

PHYS 2954. Participating in Physics. 1 cr. hr.

Designed to prepare students to apply for Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU's), summer positions, graduate schools, full-time career employment, Teaching Assistant and Research Assistant positions. Covers development of proposal, cover letter, research statement, curriculum vitae and resumes. Builds awareness of available resources.

PHYS 3011. Classical Mechanics. 3 cr. hrs.

Three-dimensional motion of a particle in both Cartesian and spherical coordinate systems. Newtonian dynamics, the classical harmonic oscillator, central forces. Lagrange and Hamilton's formulations of analytical mechanics, angular momentum, Kepler's problem, and the dynamics of a rigid body. Coupled oscillators. Prereq: MATH 2451 and PHYS 1002; MATH 2451 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 2451 and PHYS 1014. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently.

PHYS 3021. Introduction to Theoretical Astrophysics. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to astrophysical problems, with emphasis on underlying physical principles; includes the nature of stars, equations of state, stellar energy generations, stellar structure and evolution, astrophysical neutrinos, binary stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars and pulsars and novae and supernovae. Prereq: PHYS 1013 and PHYS 1014 or PHYS 1003 and PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1001 and PHYS 1002 and cons. of instr.

PHYS 3022. Introduction to Observational Astronomy. 3 cr. hrs.

Nature of the Milky Way galaxy from an observer's perspective: stellar statistics and distributions, stellar populations, spiral structure, the nucleus and halo. Nature of ordinary galaxies, galaxies in our Local Group, structure of voids and superclusters. Nature of peculiar objects: Seyfert galaxies, starburst galaxies, and quasars. Elementary aspects of physical cosmology. Introduction to techniques used in modern optical and radio astronomy with emphasis on the physical and mathematical understanding of the detection of electromagnetic radiation. Prereq: PHYS 1013 and PHYS 1014 or PHYS 1003 and PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1001 and PHYS 1002 and cons. of instr.; PHYS 2004 or PHYS 2400; PHYS 3021.

PHYS 3056. Contemporary Physics Lab 1. 2 cr. hrs.

Experiments in a variety of modern physics topics. Laboratory safety and methods, scientific writing and error analysis. Prereq: PHYS 2055 or PHYS 2500.

PHYS 3100. Classical Mechanics. 3 cr. hrs.

Three-dimensional motion of a particle in both Cartesian and spherical coordinate systems. Newtonian dynamics, central forces. Lagrange's and Hamilton's formulations of analytical mechanics, angular momentum, Kepler's problem and the dynamics of a rigid body. Prereq: MATH 2451; PHYS 1002, PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1014; PHYS 2500, all of which may be taken concurrently; or cons. of instr.

PHYS 3989. Applied Physics Immersion Experience 1. 0 cr. hrs.

For students completing a pre-approved full-time internship or co-op comprising of at least 240 hours. Placement internship in research or industry in an applied physics setting. Internships must be approved in advance. Responsibilities include relevant academic content. Grading and credits are accomplished by registering for PHYS 4989 during the following term. Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

PHYS 3990. Applied Physics Immersion Experience 2. 0 cr. hrs.

For students completing a pre-approved full-time internship or co-op comprising of at least 240 hours. Placement internship in research or industry in an applied physics setting. Internships must be approved in advance. Responsibilities include relevant academic content. Grading and credits are accomplished by registering for PHYS 4990 during the following term. Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

PHYS 4012. Quantum Mechanics. 3 cr. hrs.

Quantum states, state vectors, observables and operators. The formal structure of quantum mechanics. Time evolution of the state vector. The Hamiltonian. Position and momentum representations, and the wave function. One-dimensional wave mechanics and the harmonic oscillator. Three-dimensional wave mechanics. Symmetry, angular momentum, and the hydrogen atom. Fermions, and bosons. Perturbation methods. Prereq: MATH 2451; PHYS 2004 or PHYS 2500; or cons. of instr.

PHYS 4024. Modern Optics. 3 cr. hrs.

Geometric optics, classical wave theory of optics, interference, diffraction, polarization, electromagnetic theory of light, interaction of light and matter, lasers and coherence. Prereq: MATH 1451 and PHYS 1002; or MATH 1451 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 1451 and PHYS 1014.

PHYS 4031. Electricity and Magnetism 1. 3 cr. hrs.

Electrostatics: Coulomb's law and Gauss' law. The electric field in dielectric materials. Microscopic theory of Ohm's law and steady state currents. The magnetic field, Biot-Savart law, Ampere's law, the vector potential. Magnetic materials. Electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law. Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves. Prereq: MATH 2450 and PHYS 1002; or MATH 2450 and PHYS 1004; or MATH 2450 and PHYS 1014.

PHYS 4032. Electricity and Magnetism 2. 3 cr. hrs.

Boundary value problems: The solution of electrostatic and magnetostatic problems in continuous media. Microscopic theories of the dielectric and magnetic properties of materials. Electromagnetic waves in bounded regions. Reflection, refraction and dispersion. Radiation from accelerated charges. Antennae. Electrodynamics and the theory of special relativity. Prereq: PHYS 4031.

PHYS 4034. Modern Optics. 3 cr. hrs.

Applications of Maxwell's Equations to vacuum and material propagation. Both long wavelength and short wavelength limits (physical and geometric optics) are analyzed along with cavity solutions (lasers) and wave guides (microwave propagation and fiber optics). Prereq: PHYS 4031.

PHYS 4046. The Physical Basis of Biological Structure and Function. 3 cr. hrs.

The molecular processes of life occur in a complex aqueous molecular environment. Biological molecules and their environments are governed by the principles of physics. This course presents and explains physical techniques and models based on mechanics, thermodynamics, and electricity and magnetism, and shows how they apply to help characterize and understand the environments in which cells and biological molecules operate, while also helping to explain cellular and physiological processes. Prereq: PHYS 1002, 1004 or 1014 and CHEM 1002, MATH 1410 or MATH 1451.

PHYS 4050. Introduction to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity. 3 cr. hrs.

Special relativity including spacetime diagrams and 4-vectors. Tensor calculus, non-Euclidean geometry, and arbitrary coordinate systems. The Schwarzschild metric, orbits and precession, gravitational lensing, and black holes. Cosmological and gravitational wave solutions to the Einstein equation. Prereq: Physics 1003 & 1004; or 1013 & 1014; MATH 1450, MATH 1451 and MATH 2450.

PHYS 4057. Contemporary Physics Lab 2. 2 cr. hrs.

Further development of experimental techniques learned in PHYS 3056. Student-led development of projects. Prereq: PHYS 3056.

PHYS 4062. Introduction to Thermodynamics. 3 cr. hrs.

Fundamental concepts of thermodynamics: temperature, internal energy, entropy and thermodynamic potentials. Laws of thermodynamics, their consequences and applications. Introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Prereq: MATH 2450; PHYS 2005 or PHYS 2400.

PHYS 4065. Experimental Methods in Molecular Biophysics. 3 cr. hrs.

An introduction to the field of biological physics which develops the science and illustrates the applications of the techniques of X-ray diffraction and spin resonance to problems of biological interest: protein structural dynamics, ion channels and transport through cell membranes. Prereq: PHYS 2004 and PHYS 4031; or PHYS 2400 and PHYS 4031; or PHYS 4046.

PHYS 4071. Atomic Physics. 3 cr. hrs.

Quantum mechanics of one and many electron atoms. Spin, orbital, and total angular momentum. Atoms in electric and magnetic fields, the Stark effect and the Zeeman effect. Atomic transitions, symmetry and selection rules. The periodic table and shell structure. Modern spectroscopy. Prereq: PHYS 2004 and 2005; or PHYS 2400 and 2500. PHYS 4012 recommended.

PHYS 4072. Introduction to Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics. 3 cr. hrs.

Experimental methods in nuclear and particle physics. Theories of nuclear structure, radioactivity, decay schemes, fission and fusion models, conservation laws. Elementary particle classifications and the Standard Model. Prereq: PHYS 4012.

PHYS 4075. Introduction to Solid State Physics. 3 cr. hrs.

Crystal structure of solids, the reciprocal lattice and diffraction. Lattice vibrations and thermal properties. Electrons in metals, band structure and semiconductors. The Fermi surface. Dielectric and magnetic properties of solids. Superconductivity. Prereq: PHYS 2005 or PHYS 2400; PHYS 4012.

PHYS 4931. Topics in Contemporary Physics. 3 cr. hrs.

Topics drawn from areas of current interest such as astrophysics, atmospheric physics, biophysics, condensed matter physics or particle physics. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHYS 4953. Seminar in Physics. 1 cr. hr.

Critical analysis of the original works of scientists who have made significant contributions to Physics. May not be used as an upper division elective course for the physics major. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHYS 4953H. Honors Seminar in Physics. 1 cr. hr.

Critical analysis of the original works of scientists who have made significant contributions to Physics. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. May be repeated. May not be used as an upper division elective course for the physics major. Prereq: Admission to the PHYS Disciplinary Honors Program.

PHYS 4954. Review and Preparation for Post-Graduate Life. 1 cr. hr.

Includes a review of fundamental topics in physics in order to prepare for the Physics GRE exam, focusing on practice GRE exams. Additionally, applications for graduate school and/or employment in physics are discussed.

PHYS 4956. Undergraduate Research in Physics. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Research project conducted under the direction of a faculty advisor. Prereq: Consent of Instructor.

PHYS 4956H. Honors Undergraduate Research. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Experimental or theoretical research in an area of contemporary physics under the guidance of a physics faculty member who has expertise in that area. Successful completion includes a summary paper and an oral presentation to the regular physics faculty. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. May be repeated. May not be used as an upper division elective course for the physics major. Prereq: Cons. of instr., Jr. stndg.; admission to the PHYS Disciplinary Honors Program.

PHYS 4989. Applied Physics Immersion Experience 1 - Grading Period. 1 cr. hr.

Full-time co-op or internship grading period. Grading for preceding co-op work assignment is accomplished by completing a report on the work assignment, a report on academic material related to the work assignment, and other materials, as required. Grading is completed during the school term following the work assignment. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: PHYS 3989.

PHYS 4990. Applied Physics Immersion Experience 2 - Grading Period. 1 cr. hr.

Full-time co-op or internship grading period. Grading for preceding co-op work assignment is accomplished by completing a report on the work assignment, a report on academic material related to the work assignment, and other materials, as required. Grading is completed during the school term following the work assignment. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: PHYS 3990.

PHYS 4995. Independent Study in Physics. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Independent study of special topics in physics under faculty supervision. Topics selected by students. May not be used as an upper division elective course for the physics major. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

PHYS 4997. Physics Exploration Capstone. 2 cr. hrs.

Students propose and develop an independent project incorporating material you learned in the physics curriculum. The project must include a measurement of a physical system, and a theoretical prediction of the results. The project chosen can be any system, subject to budgetary constraints, but should target physics beyond the introductory level. In addition to the project, a written report and an oral presentation are required. Prereq: Sr. stndg.

PHYS 4999. Senior Thesis. 2 cr. hrs.

Independent research under the guidance of physics faculty. The topic may be chosen from any area of physics. Successful completion of the course includes a written thesis on the research and an oral presentation. May not be used as an upper division elective course for the physics major. Prereq: Sr. stndg. and cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of a regular physics faculty member.