Marquette University Core: Learning Outcomes

Responsible and Ethical Communicators

Marquette students will be able to responsibly and ethically use written, spoken and visual communication to express ideas, create meaning, build relationships, foster understanding, and advocate for a better tomorrow.

Moral and Ethical Actors

Marquette students will be able to articulate appropriate professional and personal judgments that are rooted in an ethical and moral foundation and informed by Catholic, Jesuit thought. They will use these foundations to make decisions that promote stronger communities and a just society.

Citizens with Purpose

Marquette students will develop a sense of purpose professionally, personally, and as global citizens who demonstrate critically reflective discernment processes that are rooted in their theological, intellectual, and personal commitments.

Collaborators Engaging Social Systems and Values

Marquette students will develop skills to engage with a spectrum of people, communities and systems of value. They will be able to analyze the sources and implications of inequity, take steps to create more inclusive and collaborative social and professional processes, acting as people with and for others.

Leaders in Discovery

Marquette students will advance understanding of the world by identifying significant questions and then searching for answers based on a systematic process of discovery that is rooted in intellectual inquiry and the Jesuit liberal arts tradition.

Global Problem Solvers

Marquette students will be well practiced in cooperative and cross-disciplinary problem-solving skills and they will be able to present innovative solutions that draw from theological, philosophical, qualitative and quantitative perspectives to address the increasingly blurred lines between local and global challenges.

Foundations courses help students build a combined intellectual and practical base for subsequent learning both within the Core and throughout their undergraduate studies at Marquette. Foundations courses invite students to consider, from multiple angles, the wholeness and diversity of knowledge and its relevance to making change in the world. More specifically, they aim to engage students in contemplating, analyzing, and communicating with others about concrete situations in multidisciplinary ways, drawing in particular on theology, philosophy and rhetoric. It is essential to help students to engage globally with people who are fundamentally different from themselves. As such, the Foundations tier includes an Engaging Social Systems and Values requirement. The goal of this Core requirement is to prepare students to encounter different social systems and engage with other systems of value. This requirement allows students to experience difference and lead them to work for greater equality and inclusivity. An important element of this part of the Core involves students reflecting upon and developing their capacity for engagement with others.

Discovery courses provide an opportunity for students to apply foundational learning and more deeply engage in interdisciplinary learning. Students choose one theme that best connects to their personal and professional goals for their Discovery requirement. Students take 4 courses from a list of courses within that theme. Each student must take one course from each of three groups – Humanities, Social Science, and Natural Science and Mathematics – within the theme. This tier allows students to discover the ways in which multiple disciplines approach a particular question, challenge or problem. Beyond the Foundations tier, students then have an opportunity to build upon their knowledge of foundational writing and ESSV concepts and sharpen their skills with more sophistication and in a second, highly experiential, ESSV designated requirement and a writing intensive-designated requirement. The second-level ESSV and writing requirements can be designated courses within or outside of the Core.

The Culminating course further integrates the Marquette Core experience, emphasizing reflection on and application of knowledge and skills developed in the Core. A special focus on vocation and discernment invites students to evaluate their course work at Marquette alongside their own worldview and transcendent commitments, in order to identify ways in which they are uniquely equipped to work for justice in the world. A collaborative, interdisciplinary analysis of a lasting problem in the local or global community presents a test-case for this integration of academic experience and personal faith for the promotion of justice. This course provides both a culminating Core experience and the foundation for an analogical application to students’ lives and work after Marquette.

Marquette Core Curriculum (MCC) - 30 Credits 

Foundation Tier - 15 credits

Foundations in Rhetoric
Foundations in Philosophy
Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things
Foundations in Methods of Inquiry
Engaging Social Systems and Values 1 (ESSV1)

Discovery Tier - 12 credits

Students must complete four Discovery Tier courses, all from the SAME Discovery Theme. These four courses must include one course from each of the three content areas (Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics and Social Science), and one elective (an additional course from any of the three content areas). A maximum of two courses in the Discovery Tier can be applied towards a primary major.

Culminating Course - 3 credits

The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice

Additional Requirements

1.  Writing Intensive Requirement (WRIT) - Students must complete a course that is designated "WRIT."  This requirement can be completed via one of their four Discovery Tier courses or through other degree requirements. 

2.  Engaging Social System and Values 2 (ESSV2) - Students must complete a course that is designated "ESSV2."  This requirement can be completed via one of their four Discovery Tier courses or through other degree requirements.

MCC Requirements for Advanced Standing (Transfer) Students

Students who transfer to Marquette University are placed into one of four levels based on the amount of credits transferred into Marquette University. Each level listed below specifies the MCC requirements that students are expected to complete at Marquette University.

With the exception of the Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) degrees and second bachelor degree earners, students' placement into one of the four levels below is based on the number of accepted transfer credits completed prior to the term of admission to Marquette. The MCC Transfer Level Placement is based on completed and awarded courses at the time of admission (test credits, such as AP or IB are not included in the Transfer Level Placement). Placements are adjusted as final transcripts are received and additional credit is awarded. The final official transcript(s) reflecting all of the courses taken by students at external institutions must be received in the Office of the Registrar within 30 business days of the start of the admit term to be reflected in an adjustment of the MCC Transfer Level Placement.

Any credits completed at another institution after the term of admission does not change the original placement level.

 MCC Transfer Level 1 (12-23 transfer credits awarded at MU)

ENGL 1001Foundations in Rhetoric3
PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things3
CORE 1929Foundations in Methods of Inquiry3
Engaging Social Systems and Values (ESSV1 or ESSV2)3
Discovery Tier9
Humanities - 1 course
Social Science - 1 course
Natural Science and Mathematics - 1 course
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Total Credit Hours27

MCC Transfer Level 2 (24-48 transfer credits awarded at MU)

ENGL 1001Foundations in Rhetoric3
PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things3
CORE 1929Foundations in Methods of Inquiry3
Engaging Social System and Values (ESSV1 or ESSV2)3
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Total Credit Hours18

MCC Transfer Level 3 (49 or more transfer credits awarded at MU)

PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things3
CORE 1929Foundations in Methods of Inquiry3
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Total Credit Hours12

MCC Transfer Level 4 (earned AA, AS or bachelor degree prior to the term of admission)

PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things3
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Total Credit Hours9

Note: Students who transfer courses that are equivalent to Marquette Core Curriculum courses may use these courses to fulfill requirements.  

Engaging Social Systems and Values 1 (ESSV 1)

ANTH 1001Being Human3
EDUC 1220Psychology of Human Development in Children and Adolescents in a Diverse Society3
ENGL 2020Texts, Social Systems and Values3
ENGL 2030Global Literatures3
HEAL 1025Culture and Health3
HIST 1601Difference and Democracy3
HIST 1701Engaging the World3
SOCI 1001Principles of Sociology3
SOWJ 1001Introduction to Social Welfare and Justice3
SPAN 3300Peoples and Cultures of Spain3
SPAN 3310Peoples and Cultures of Latin America3

Discovery Tier Themes (DSCV)

Basic Needs and Justice

Humanities (HUM) Social Sciences (SSC) Natural Science/Mathematics (NSM)
ENGL 4755, FREN 4330, HIST 4150, HIST 4155 (ESSV2), HIST 4271, HIST 4298, PHIL 3660, PHIL 4320, PHIL 4330, PHIL 4335, SPAN 3710, THEO 3530 CMST 4150, CMST 4500, CRLS 1001, ECON 4047, HURE 3001, POSC 2401, POSC 4661, PSYC 3210 BIOL 1410, BIOL 3701, BIOL 4101, BISC 3110, BISC 4153, CLLS 2060, EXPH 4189, FINA 3001, HEAL 4901, MATH 1300, MATH 1410

Cognition, Memory and Intelligence

Humanities (HUM) Social Sciences (SSC) Natural Science/Mathematics (NSM)
ENGL 4250 (WRIT), ENGL 4503, ENGL 4715, PHIL 3370, PHIL 3460, PHIL 3620, PHIL 3650, SPAN 4110, SPAN 4120, SPAN 4140, THEO 2000, THEO 2250, THEO 3230, THEO 4310 POSC 4371, PSYC 3840, PSYC 4330, SOCI 2500 ARSC 1020, BIOL 3501, BISC 3850, BISC 4140, BISC 4155, BISC 4325, COSC 1010, MATH 1700

Crossing Boundaries: The Movement of People, Goods and Ideas

Humanities (HUM) Social Sciences (SSC) Natural Science/Mathematics (NSM)
HIST 3101, HIST 3205, HIST 3455, HIST 4120 (ESSV2), HIST 4255, HIST 4450, ITAL 3200, PHIL 3390, PHIL 3780, SPAN 3700, SPAN 4150 (ESSV2), SPAN 4320, SPAN 4400, THEO 4210, THEO 4405, THEO 4500 ANTH 2501, CMST 4120, CMST 4400, CMST 4410, ECON 4040, MARK 4040, MARQ 1005 and MARQ 3005 (both must be completed), SOWJ 2150, SOWJ 3450 ACCO 4040, ANTH 1201, BIOL 3404, BISC 3859, BISC 4150, EXPH 4187, FINA 4040, MATH 1700

Individuals and Communities

Humanities (HUM) Social Sciences (SSC) Natural Science/Mathematics (NSM)
ENGL 3240 (WRIT), ENGL 4210 (WRIT), HIST 4145, HIST 4212, HIST 4245, HIST 4500, MUSI 2440, PHIL 2310, PHIL 3710, PHIL 3770, SPAN 3500, THAR 3620, THEO 2200, THEO 2210, THEO 2240, THEO 2400, THEO 3100, THEO 3320, THEO 3420, THEO 4020, THEO 4250, THEO 4330, THEO 4410, THEO 4520, THEO 4530 ARSC 4953, CMST 4110, CMST 4140, CMST 4160, EDUC 4240, MANA 3001, POSC 2201, POSC 4201, POSC 4221, POSC 4231, PSYC 3550, REAL 3001 BIOL 2401, BISC 4150, BISC 4153, BISC 4170, BISC 4210, EXPH 4187, MATH 1390

Engaging Social Systems and Values 2 (ESSV2)

ANTH 4986Advanced Internship in Anthropology3
CRLS 4986Advanced Internship and Seminar in Criminology and Law Studies3
HIST 4120American Immigration (DSCV HUM)3
HIST 4135African-American History3
HIST 4155A History of Native America (DSCV HUM)3
MANA 3035Diversity in Organizations3
SOCI 4986Advanced Internship and Seminar in Sociology3
SOWJ 4986Advanced Internship in Social Welfare and Justice3
SPAN 4150Spanish in the United States (DSCV HUM)3

Writing Intensive Courses (WRIT)

ACCO 4000Accounting Communications3
ANTH 2101Cultural Anthropology3
ARBC 3210Arabic Literature in English Translation3
BIOL 3202Experimental Genetics3
CMST 3000Theories in Communication Studies3
CRLS 3050Methods of Criminological Research3
EDUC 4540Philosophy of Education3
ENGL 3240Introduction to Creative Writing (DSCV HUM)3
ENGL 4210Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies (DSCV HUM)3
ENGL 4220Rhetorical Theories and Practices3
ENGL 4230Writing Center Theory, Practice, and Research4
ENGL 4250Creative Writing: Fiction (DSCV HUM)3
ENGL 4932Topics in Writing3
ENGL 4954Seminar in Creative Writing3
ENGL 4997Capstone3
HIST 3104The Civil War Era3
HIST 4210The Black Death3
HIST 4955Undergraduate Seminar in History3
JOUR 4150Investigative Reporting3
PHIL 3610Ancient Philosophy3
POSC 3101Writing and Argumentation in Political Science3
PURE 3600Public Relations Writing3
SPAN 3505Introduction to Literary Analysis in Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers3
THAR 4600Playwriting3

Courses

CORE 1929. Foundations in Methods of Inquiry. 3 cr. hrs.

Compares and contrasts the approach of three different disciplines to a common theme. Asks students to reflect on what disciplinary methods they find most appealing or challenging, and why.

CORE 1929H. Honors Foundations in Methods of Inquiry. 1.5 cr. hr.

Compares and contrasts the approach of three different disciplines to a common theme. Asks students to reflect on what disciplinary methods they find most appealing or challenging, and why. Taken both fall and spring terms of the freshman year. Completion of both terms (3 credits) satisfies the MCC Foundations in Methods of Inquiry requirement. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

CORE 4929. The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice. 3 cr. hrs.

Designed to integrate the Marquette core by emphasizing the reflection on and application of knowledge and skills developed in the core for life beyond Marquette University. Special focus on vocation and discernment invites students to evaluate their coursework at Marquette alongside their own worldview and transcendent commitments in order to identify ways they are uniquely equipped to work for justice in the world. A collaborative, interdisciplinary analysis of a lasting problem in the local or global community presents a test-case for this integration of academic experience and personal faith for the promotion of justice, providing the foundation for an analogical application to student’s lives and work after Marquette.