Marquette University Core: Learning Outcomes

Responsible and Ethical Communicators

Marquette students will be able to responsibly and ethically use written, spoken and visual communication to express ideas, create meaning, build relationships, foster understanding and advocate for a better tomorrow.

Moral and Ethical Actors

Marquette students will be able to articulate appropriate professional and personal judgments that are rooted in an ethical and moral foundation and informed by Catholic, Jesuit thought. They will use these foundations to make decisions that promote stronger communities and a just society.

Citizens with Purpose

Marquette students will develop a sense of purpose professionally, personally and as global citizens who demonstrate critically reflective discernment processes that are rooted in their theological, intellectual and personal commitments.

Collaborators Promoting Equity and Justice across Cultural Contexts

Marquette students will develop skills to understand how power, positionality and privilege shape their own lives and those of others, locally and globally. They will be able to describe how racism, colonialism, classism, sexism, other forms of prejudice and other oppressive forces have impacted and continue to impact the well-being of marginalized groups and to identify historical and structural barriers to equity and inclusiveness. They will also be able to recognize the innate human dignity shared across diverse groups and to apply skills learned in class to work within and across cultures to promote justice and equity.

Leaders in Discovery

Marquette students will advance understanding of the world by identifying significant questions and then searching for answers based on a systematic process of discovery that is rooted in intellectual inquiry and the Jesuit liberal arts tradition.

Global Problem Solvers

Marquette students will be well practiced in cooperative and cross-disciplinary problem-solving skills and they will be able to present innovative solutions that draw from theological, philosophical, qualitative and quantitative perspectives to address the increasingly blurred lines between local and global challenges.

Foundations courses help students build a combined intellectual and practical base for subsequent learning both within the Core and throughout their undergraduate studies at Marquette. Foundations courses invite students to consider, from multiple angles, the wholeness and diversity of knowledge and its relevance to making change in the world. More specifically, they aim to engage students in contemplating, analyzing and communicating with others about concrete situations in multidisciplinary ways, drawing in particular on theology, philosophy and rhetoric. It is essential to help students to engage globally with people who are fundamentally different from themselves. As such, the Foundations tier includes an Engaging Social Systems and Values requirement. The goal of this Core requirement is to prepare students to encounter different social systems and engage with other systems of value. This requirement allows students to experience difference and lead them to work for greater equality and inclusivity. An important element of this part of the Core involves students reflecting upon and developing their capacity for engagement with others.

Discovery courses provide an opportunity for students to apply foundational learning and more deeply engage in interdisciplinary learning. Students choose one theme that best connects to their personal and professional goals for their Discovery requirements. Students take 4 courses from within their selected theme. Students take one course from each of three content areas of Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics, and Social Science, as well as one additional course (elective) from any of the three content areas. This tier allows students to discover the ways in which multiple disciplines approach a particular question, challenge or problem. Beyond the Foundations tier, students then have an opportunity to build upon their knowledge of foundational writing and ESSV concepts and sharpen their skills with more sophistication and in a second, highly experiential, ESSV designated requirement and a writing intensive-designated requirement. The second-level ESSV and writing requirements can be designated courses within or outside of the Core.

The Culminating course further integrates the Marquette Core experience, emphasizing reflection on and application of knowledge and skills developed in the Core. A special focus on vocation and discernment invites students to evaluate their course work at Marquette alongside their own worldview and transcendent commitments, in order to identify ways in which they are uniquely equipped to work for justice in the world. A collaborative, interdisciplinary analysis of a lasting problem in the local or global community presents a test-case for this integration of academic experience and personal faith for the promotion of justice. The course provides both a culminating Core experience and the foundation for an analogical application to students’ lives and work after Marquette.

Marquette Core Curriculum (MCC) - 30 Credits 

Foundation Tier - 15 credits

Foundations in Rhetoric
Core Honors First-Year Seminar
Foundations in Philosophy
Honors Foundations in Philosophy
Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things
Honors Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things
Foundations in Methods of Inquiry
Honors Foundations in Methods of Inquiry
Engaging Social Systems and Values 1 (ESSV1)

Discovery Tier - 12 credits

Students must complete four Discovery Tier courses, all from the SAME Discovery Theme. These four courses must include one course from each of the three content areas (Humanities, Natural Science and Mathematics and Social Science), and one elective (an additional course from any of the three content areas). A maximum of two courses in the Discovery Tier can be applied towards a primary major.

Students declare their Discovery Theme using the Discovery Tier Declaration Form.

For students who participate in a full-time (12 credits or more) Marquette approved study abroad program, one study abroad course (minimum 2.5 transfer credits awarded) may fulfill the elective requirement of the Discovery Tier. Any additional MCC requirements may be fulfilled only when the approved transfer equivalent is an exact match to a specific MCC course.  

Culminating Course - 3 credits

The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice
Honors Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice

Additional Requirements

1.  Writing Intensive Requirement (WRIT) - Students must complete a course that is designated "WRIT."  This requirement can be completed via one of their four Discovery Tier courses or through other degree requirements. 

2.  Engaging Social System and Values 2 (ESSV2) - Students must complete a course or approved experience that is designated "ESSV2."  This requirement can be completed via one of their four Discovery Tier courses or through other degree requirements.

Grade Requirements

A grade of C or better is required in Honors MCC courses. A passing grade is required in non-Honors MCC courses.

Readmission

Students who are readmitting to the university and, in consultation with their college, determine that the completion of the MCC core requirements is the best course of action for completing their degree, are assigned MCC levels under the same parameters as transfer students.

Test and Transfer Credits

Test and transfer courses that are equivalent to approved MCC courses may be applied to fulfill MCC requirements, with the following exceptions: 1) CORE 4929 must be completed at Marquette, 2) CORE 1929 and WRIT courses apply only by approval from the director of the MCC requested via the Marquette Core Curriculum Substitution form

MCC Requirements for Advanced Standing (Transfer) Students

Students who transfer to Marquette University are placed into one of four MCC levels. Each level listed below specifies the MCC requirements that students are expected to complete at Marquette University.

Placement into levels one through three below is based on the number of accepted transfer course credits completed prior to the term of admission at Marquette.  Test credits (e.g., AP or IB) and other prior learning credit (e.g., military education and training) are not included in the MCC Transfer Level Placement.  For placement into level four, students must transfer to Marquette with a completed Associate of Arts (AA), Associate of Science (AS), or bachelor’s degree.  Students who have completed approved associate degree programs requiring a comparable breadth of transferable liberal arts courses to the AA or AS degree also will qualify for level four. 

A MCC Transfer Level Placement is established based on the initial awarding of transfer credit after admission and adjusted, as needed, upon the receipt of final college transcripts reflecting additional earned credit.  It is strongly recommended that final official transcripts are submitted to Marquette as early as possible to ensure an accurate MCC Transfer Level Placement is determined and reflected in degree requirements prior to finalizing class registration.  Students maintain responsibility for submitting their final official college transcripts to Marquette in a timely manner and any class registration decisions made before the MCC Transfer Level Placement is finalized. 

Credits completed at another institution after the term of admission do not change the MCC Transfer Placement Level.

 MCC Transfer Level 1 (12-23 transfer credits awarded at MU)

ENGL 1001Foundations in Rhetoric3
PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things3
CORE 1929Foundations in Methods of Inquiry3
Engaging Social Systems and Values (ESSV1 or ESSV2)3
Discovery Tier9
Humanities - 1 course
Social Science - 1 course
Natural Science and Mathematics - 1 course
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Total Credit Hours:27

MCC Transfer Level 2 (24-48 transfer credits awarded at MU)

ENGL 1001Foundations in Rhetoric3
PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things3
CORE 1929Foundations in Methods of Inquiry3
Engaging Social System and Values (ESSV1 or ESSV2)3
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Total Credit Hours:18

MCC Transfer Level 3 (49 or more transfer credits awarded at MU)

PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things3
CORE 1929Foundations in Methods of Inquiry3
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Total Credit Hours:12

MCC Transfer Level 4 (earned AA, AS or bachelor degree prior to the term of admission)

PHIL 1001Foundations in Philosophy3
THEO 1001Foundations in Theology: Finding God in all Things3
CORE 4929The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice3
Total Credit Hours:9

Note: Test and transfer courses that are equivalent to approved MCC courses may be applied to fulfill MCC requirements, with the following exceptions: 1) CORE 4929 must be completed at Marquette, 2) CORE 1929 and WRIT courses apply only by approval from the director of the MCC requested via the Marquette Core Curriculum Substitution form.

Engaging Social Systems and Values 1 (ESSV 1) Course options

ANTH 1001Being Human3
EDUC 1001Psychological Development: Children and Adolescents3
ENGL 2020Texts, Social Systems and Values3
ENGL 2030Global Literatures3
HEAL 1025Culture and Health3
HIST 1601Difference and Democracy3
HIST 1701Engaging the World3
HOPR 2956HHonors Engaging Social Systems and Values 1: Engaging the City3
INGS 1001Introduction to Gender and Sexualities Studies3
SOCI 1001Principles of Sociology3
SOWJ 1001Introduction to Social Welfare and Justice3
SPAN 3300Peoples and Cultures of Spain3
SPAN 3310Peoples and Cultures of Latin America3

Engaging Social Systems and Values 2 (ESSV2) Course options

ADPR 4750Strategic Communication in a Culturally Diverse Marketplace3
ADVE 3986Internship in Advertising3
ANTH 3100Urban Anthropology3
ANTH 3986Internship in Anthropology3
ANTH 4986Advanced Internship in Anthropology3
ARBC 3200Culture and Civilization of the Middle East (WRIT)3
ARBC 3220Arab and Muslim Women in the United States (WRIT)3
ARSC 4953Seminar In Urban Social Issues3
BISC 4460Practical Cases in Medicine3
BULA 4001Business Law for Accounting3
CCOM 4986Corporate Communication Internship0-3
CHNS 3215Chinese Cuisine and Culture3
CMST 3120Interpersonal Communication3
CMST 4986Internship in Communication Studies0-3
CNEN 3860Construction Materials and Methods3
COMM 4986Internship in Communication0-3
CRLS 3170Policy and Practice for Children Impacted by Incarceration3
CRLS 3540Surveillance, Law and Society3
CRLS 3986Internship and Seminar in Criminology and Law Studies3
CRLS 4986Advanced Internship and Seminar in Criminology and Law Studies3
DGMD 3986Internship in Digital Media3
EDUC 4965Student Teaching: Middle/Secondary15
EDUC 4966Student Teaching: Elementary/Middle15
EDUC 4986Community-Engaged Internship 13
EDUC 4987Community-Engaged Internship 23
ENGL 2001Ways of Knowing (WRIT)3
ENGL 3249Creativity and Community3
ENGL 3261Poetry and Community (WRIT)3
ENGL 3780Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates (WRIT)3
ENGL 4140Sociolinguistics3
ENGL 4221The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X (WRIT)3
ENGL 4222Feminist Rhetorics (WRIT)3
ENGL 4223The Rhetoric of Black Protest (WRIT)3
ENGL 4230Writing Center Theory, Practice and Research (WRIT)4
ENGL 4453Romanticism and Nature (WRIT)3
ENGL 4825Native American / Indigenous Literatures (WRIT)3
ENGL 4826Global Indigenous Literatures (WRIT)3
GEEN 2960Engineering Social Systems and Values0
GRMN 3550German Reunification: The Collision of Two Worlds3
HIST 4120American Immigration3
HIST 4125Latinx Civil Rights Movements3
HIST 4135African-American History3
HIST 4140American Urban History3
HIST 4155A History of Native America3
HIST 4247Comparative Homefronts during the Second World War3
INPS 2010Introduction to Peace Studies3
JOUR 3986Internship in Journalism0-3
JOUR 4986Internship in Journalism0-3
LLAC 2220Cultures and Foodways3
LLAC 2250Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice3
MANA 3035Diversity in Organizations3
MARQ 3929Engaging Social Systems and Values Reflective Analysis0
MARQ 3961International Service Learning - Living Justice: Accompaniment in an Unjust World3
NURS 3956HHonors Nursing Practicum 11
NURS 3965Community and Population Health Nursing - Clinical 12
PHIL 3502Narrating Freedom: Gender, Race and Mass Incarceration3
PHIL 3507Global Justice3
PHTH 4512Culture and Disability3
PSYC 3201Introductory Social Psychology3
PSYC 3420Health Psychology3
PURE 3986Internship in Public Relations0-3
SOCI 3700Social Movements, Protest and Change3
SOCI 3986Internship and Seminar in Sociology3
SOCI 4986Advanced Internship and Seminar in Sociology3
SOWJ 3170Policy and Practice for Children Impacted by Incarceration3
SOWJ 3400Advocacy and Social Change: Theory and Practice3
SOWJ 3986Internship in Social Welfare and Justice3
SOWJ 4700Global Aid and Humanitarianism3
SOWJ 4986Advanced Internship in Social Welfare and Justice3
SPAN 4150Spanish in the United States3
THAR 3620Multicultural Playwrights3
THAR 4986Internship in Theatre Arts0-3
THEO 2500Theologies of Nonviolence 13
THEO 3250Contemplation and Justice in a Violent World3
THEO 3350Christian-Muslim Dialogue3
THEO 3600Theology Engaging Culture3
THEO 4270The Many Faces of U.S. Catholicism3
THEO 4400Christian Faith and Justice 13

Discovery Theme

Basic Needs and Justice

This theme explores the interrelationship between basic needs and justice. If something is so essential to human life that no human being can survive without it, then access to this basic need would seem to be a matter of justice. Yet the identification of basic needs is not necessarily straightforward. Food, water, clothing, and shelter are all essential for survival, but how much of each constitutes a basic need, and how much is a matter of luxury? In what ways have these thresholds been culturally conditioned? Are higher order concerns like health care, education, social connection, and freedom from the threat of violence fairly defined as basic needs as well?

This theme encourages a fuller study of the nature of the human person and the notion of a fully human life in order to answer these and related questions. At the same time, because the distribution of basic needs is a matter of justice, this theme also invites students to examine how different descriptions of basic needs have influenced the definition of justice and vice versa.

At what point does the lack of access to one’s basic needs become an injustice? How should one react to the unjust distribution of basic needs? Can violence be used in the pursuit of justice or are nonviolent means the only option? Who bears the responsibility for ensuring a just distribution? Who (or what) is to blame for an unjust distribution? With a clearer picture of the basic needs that make up a human life and the norms of justice that regulate access to them, students will be prepared to identify and address injustices in the world around them.

Humanities (HUM)3
Writing for Health and Medicine (WRIT)
Disability and Literature (WRIT)
Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates (ESSV2, WRIT)
LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory (WRIT)
The Rhetoric of Black Protest (ESSV2, WRIT)
Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment (WRIT)
British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-1900 (WRIT)
Law and Literature (WRIT)
Medicine and Literature (WRIT)
Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies (WRIT)
Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies (WRIT)
French Holocaust Writings in English Translation (WRIT)
Francophone Studies in Human Rights
History of Capitalism
Childhood in America
A History of Native America (ESSV2)
Historical Justice in Modern Germany
The Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union
The Cold War
Introduction to Peace Studies (ESSV2)
Philosophy of War and Peace
Marx and Marxism
Philosophy and History of Crime and Punishment
Contemporary Ethical Problems
Business Ethics
Biomedical Ethics
Introduction to Spanish for Health Care
Economic Justice in the Biblical Tradition
Introduction to Latin American Theology 1
Latin America and the Martyrs
Theology and Global Health
Theology and Economics (WRIT) 1
Christian Faith and Justice (ESSV2) 1
Natural Science and Mathematics (NSM)3
Biology of Human Disease
Biochemistry and the Molecular Basis of Biology
Human Physiology
Nutritional Aspects of Health
Practical Cases in Medicine (ESSV2)
Transportation Engineering
Environmental Chemistry
Nutrition and Exercise Performance
Introduction to Financial Management
Interdisciplinary Palliative Care
The Nature of Mathematics
Calculus for the Biological Sciences
Public Health
Social Sciences (SSC)3
Legal and Ethical Environment of Business (WRIT)
Issues in Corporate Communication
Organizational Communication
Communication and Conflict
Health Communication
Introduction to Criminology
Economics of Healthcare and Health Policy
Development Economics
Management of Human Resources
Comparative Politics 1
The Political Economy of Development
The Psychology of Prejudice
Psychology of Racism
Elective (ELE) - one additional course from any of the three content areas in this theme3
Total Credit Hours:12

Discovery Theme

Cognition, Memory and Intelligence

How do we process interactions with the world around us? How do we acquire knowledge? How do we make memories? How does language influence how we think? How do social interactions change how we think? How do we imagine things and events we've not experienced? How do new technologies change how we think? Why and how do the answers to these questions change over the course of one's life? How does lifestyle, injury or disease affect these processes? What is artificial intelligence, and how is artificial intelligence in computers and machines different from human intelligence?

Students choosing this theme will study the mind from a variety of perspectives, including: neurocognitive processes of early childhood and adult brain development, mental disorder, trauma and PTSD; language acquisition, speech pathology, and the cognitive operations of multilingualism and translation; artificial intelligence, machine learning and data science; and reflections on and representations and understandings of the workings of the human mind in history, theology, philosophy, literature and languages, and communications and media studies.

Humanities (HUM)3
Books that Matter (WRIT)
Crafting the Short Story (WRIT)
Modern Irish Literature (WRIT)
Exploring the English Language
British Literature since 1900
Children's Literature (WRIT)
Comics and Graphic Narrative
Fiction
French Phonetics
Imagining the Middle Ages
History and Memory
Sparta in Ancient and Modern Memory
Understanding World Cinema and Television Series
Philosophy of Art
Epistemology
Philosophy of Language
Medieval Philosophy
Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy of Mind
Structure of Spanish from a Linguistic Perspective
Spanish Phonetics
Spanish Pragmatics: Language Use in Context
Spanish Second Language Acquisition
Memory and the Making of the Old Testament 1
Prayer and Mystical Experience 1
Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius 1
Theology in the Writings of C. S. Lewis 1
Contemplation and Justice in a Violent World (ESSV2)
Virtues and Vices
Theology of the Holy Spirit
Natural Science/Mathematics (NSM)3
Major Concepts in Modern Science 1
Neuroscience for Non-majors
Cellular Neurobiology
Systems Neuroscience
Functional Neuroanatomy
Diseases of the Brain
Endocrinology
Introduction to Intelligent Systems
Introduction to Computer Science
Introduction to Software Development
Introduction to Cybersecurity
Modern Elementary Statistics 1
Social Sciences (SSC)3
Media and Politics in the U.S.
General Psychology
Cognition
Principles of Psychological Testing
Psychology of Happiness
Human Factors Engineering
Self, Language and Social Interaction
Elective (ELE) - one additional course from any of the three content areas in this theme3
Total Credit Hours:12

Discovery Theme

Crossing Boundaries: The Movement of People, Goods and Ideas

As our world grows “smaller,” our everyday lives are increasingly affected by global events. This theme is designed for students interested in global connections and their impacts both local and far away. Historically cultures intermingle, adapt and communicate with each other through voluntarily (migration/immigration) and involuntarily (war, conflict and displacement) movement of people, ideas and goods. Migration of people across political boundaries is a social, political, scientific and economic issue, presenting both great challenges and great opportunities. Migration also has a scientific perception: Scientists investigate topics as diverse as gene migration, population genetics and the psychological effect of migration on the young minds and adult behavior. Currently, scarcely any country in the world is not affected in some way by migration. Not only does migration reward interdisciplinary study; it demands it, if we are to begin to grasp its complexity and respond effectively.

Students studying this theme will investigate a wide range of questions about global boundaries, from a wide range of perspectives: Why does migration occur? What effects does it have on migrating peoples and on those who receive migrants? How do our concepts of political sovereignty and economic justice shape our responses to migration, and how might migration shape those concepts in turn? How can international, national and local communities work together to relieve suffering and distribute resources equitably?

Humanities (HUM)3
Chinese Culture and Civilization
Chinese Cuisine and Culture (ESSV2)
Chinese Society: Speaking and Reading Skills
Chinese Business Culture
Indo-European Culture and Religion
Here Be Monsters (WRIT)
Crossing Over (WRIT)
Film Studies
Global Hip Hop (WRIT)
Transatlantic Literature, 1700-1900 (WRIT)
Romanticism and Nature (ESSV2, WRIT)
Native American / Indigenous Literatures (ESSV2, WRIT)
Global Indigenous Literatures (ESSV2, WRIT)
Postcolonial Literatures
History of Latin America (WRIT)
Early America, 1491-1789
The Byzantine Empire
Middle East
American Immigration (ESSV2)
Latinx Civil Rights Movements (ESSV2)
The British Empire
North Africa
Italian Culture and Civilization
Introduction to Latinx Studies
Cultures and Foodways (ESSV2)
Latin American Philosophy
Global Justice (ESSV2)
Caribbean Philosophy
Africana Philosophy
Latin American and Latinx Women Writers in Translation
Introduction to Business Spanish
Spanish in the United States (ESSV2)
Latin American and Latinx Contemporary Issues
U.S. Latinx Literature
New Testament Overview 1
History and Theology of the Christian East
The Many Faces of U.S. Catholicism (ESSV2)
Christian Theology in Global Contexts 1
Christ and World Religions: Theology of Interreligious Dialogue
Natural Science/Mathematics (NSM)3
International Accounting
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Evolutionary Biology
Evolution
Outbreaks, Epidemics and Pandemics
Global Health
Communication Statistics and Analysis
Clinical Exercise Physiology for Special Populations
International Finance
Modern Elementary Statistics 1
Operations and Supply Chain Management
Social Sciences (SSC)3
International Advertising and Public Relations
Science, Myth and Fraud
Gendered Communication
Cross-Cultural Communication
Intercultural Communication
International Economic Issues
International Marketing
MARQ 1005 and 3005 (both courses must be completed)
International Politics
Politics of Migration
Immigrants and their Communities
Arabs and Muslims in Global Context
Elective (ELE) - one additional course from any of the three content areas in this theme3
Total Credit Hours:12

Discovery Theme

Expanding Our Horizons

A defining characteristic of human beings is our desire to ask questions and to explore the unknown. We spend our lives seeking to understand our origins, probing the boundaries of the universe and uncharted frontiers, and investigating unsolved mysteries. Yet each new discovery reveals additional limitations that must be explored if knowledge and understanding are to proceed. Our impulse to expand our horizons can be seen in several traits: our innate, human creativity; our pursuit of new technologies that better respond to our challenges and provide greater insight into the unknown; and our use of imagination and inventiveness to examine our relationship to the world in which we live. Courses in this theme will focus on how the process of discovery - through art, scientific research, and other modes of seeking answers to fundamental questions - expand our understanding of the value of life and enrich our interaction with our communities, the planet, and the universe. Additionally, courses in this theme may engage the ways in which human activity and advancing technology must be weighed against immediate and long-term consequences, like climate change and pollution, in order to create sustainable solutions for the future.

Humanities (HUM)3
Classical Mythology
Introduction to Gothic Fiction (WRIT)
The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning (WRIT)
Moby-Dick (WRIT)
James Joyce's Ulysses
Science Fiction/Fantasy
What Is a Book? (WRIT)
The Epic (WRIT)
Material Cultures (WRIT)
Francophone Art or Film: Western
French Existentialism
History of Rock and Roll
Ancient History's Unsolved Mysteries
Environmental History: Ecology and Society in the Modern World
The Black Death (WRIT)
Carillon Discovery: An Introduction
Philosophy of the Environment
Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Literary Analysis in Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers (WRIT)
Stagecraft
History of Clothing 1: From Ancient Greece to the Reign of Terror
History of Clothing 2: From Jane Austen to Austin Powers
Quests for God, Paths of Revelation 1
Christian Discipleship 1
Miracles (WRIT) 1
Theology, Philosophy and Science
Theology and the Visual Arts 1
Theology and Globalization
Digging the Bible: Archeology and Biblical Studies 1
The Question of God in a Secular Age (WRIT) 1
Jesus the Christ
Foundations of Ecological Ethics
Medical Ethics
Religion, Science and Ethics (WRIT)
Theology and the Visual Arts (Theology and the Visual Arts)
Natural Science/Mathematics (NSM)3
Accounting Information Systems
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Major Concepts in Modern Science 2
Introduction to Environmental Biology
Genetics
Genomics and Bioinformatics
Conservation Biology
Pharmacology
Biology of Aging
Human and Applied Medical Genetics
General Chemistry 2 for Majors
Computers, Ethics and Society
The Nature of Mathematics
Elements of Calculus
Calculus 1
Problem Solving and Reasoning for Teachers
Statistical Methods
Survey of Meteorology
Astronomy and Space Physics
Earth and Environmental Physics
Introduction to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity
Computer Applications for the Theatre
Social Sciences (SSC)3
Washington, D.C. and the American Experience
Creativity, Communication and Innovation
Surveillance, Law and Society (ESSV2)
Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
Behavioral Economics
Business and Its Environment (WRIT)
Digital Marketing
Environment and Society
Elective (ELE) - one additional course from any of the three content areas in this theme3
Total Credit Hours:12

Discovery Theme

Individuals and Communities

The nature of the relationship between the individual and the community remains a perennial question, at the heart of technological, political, religious and ecological thought. One cannot understand prominent human trends — like the tendency, both in history and in the present day, to cluster populations in urban environments — without attending to the longings of the individual for community and the reliance of the community on the individual. Yet the relationship between these two is fraught with ambiguity and tension. On the one hand, communities have amplified humanity’s potential to overcome injustice, suffering and human limitations. Communities have enabled individuals to mobilize, innovate and act collectively for the common good. On the other hand, communities have also identified, stigmatized and exterminated outsiders. By utilizing tools of oppression, such as prejudice and discrimination, communities have also stifled progress and catered to fears, bigotry and hatred.

To explore these ideas, courses in this theme might focus on specific communities, such as the Marquette University community; they might examine individual cities, like Milwaukee, as geographically defined communities that have shaped — and been shaped by — the individuals who live there; or they might refer to community as a unit of analysis more generally to examine “community-level” processes such as racial segregation, civic engagement, public education, small business development, health care and civil engineering. Courses congruent with this theme are not restricted to any single understanding or definition of “community” and instead will consider communities of many kinds and scales, and with many purposes: religious, political, intellectual, geographical, ecological or virtual, to name only few.

Humanities (HUM)3
How to Be a Cynic: Life According to Nature
Writing for Workplaces (WRIT)
Introduction to Creative Writing (WRIT)
Poetry and Community (ESSV2, WRIT)
Jane Austen
The Art of War (WRIT)
Literature and Place
Sociolinguistics (ESSV2)
Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies (WRIT)
The Novel to 1900 (WRIT)
J. R. R. Tolkien
Poetry (WRIT)
Women Writers (WRIT)
Francophone Studies in Gender or Sexuality
German Reunification: The Collision of Two Worlds (ESSV2)
The Civil War Era (WRIT)
A History of Women in America
The Crusades
Women in Western Civilization
Modern Ireland: From the Rising to the Revolution
Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
Modern Japan
Sicilian Mafia and Antimafia Representations and Literature and Film
Appreciation of Music
History of Jazz
Theory of Ethics 1
The Ethics of Intimacy
Philosophy of Race
Philosophy of Disability
Political Philosophy
Introduction to Literary Analysis in Spanish (WRIT)
Hispanic Studies: Latin America and Latinx
Theatre Appreciation
Multicultural Playwrights (ESSV2)
The Bible Through the Ages 1
Great Moments in Christian Theology 1
Evil, Horror and Theology
A Faith Worth Dying For? Martyrs, Saints and Theology 1
The Event and Meaning of Vatican II 1
Bridging the Racial Divide 1
Women and Theology Across Cultures 1
The Bible in the Jewish Community
Martin Luther
Family, Church, and Society
Jewish Thought and Practice
Islam: Faith and Practice
Theologies of Nonviolence-International (ESSV2)
A Faith Worth Dying For? Martyrs, Saints and Theology-International
Natural Science/Mathematics (NSM)3
Ecology
Epidemiology
Biology, Moral Behavior and Policy
Communication Statistics and Analysis
Health Behavior
Clinical Exercise Physiology for Special Populations
Finite Mathematics
Social Sciences (SSC)3
Seminar In Urban Social Issues (ESSV2)
Foundations of Personal Finance: College Years and Beyond
Family Communication
Intergenerational Communication
Mediation Theory and Practice
Policy and Practice for Children Impacted by Incarceration (ESSV2)
Public Finance
Economics of Labor Markets
Educational Inquiry 2: Advanced Topics (WRIT)
Behavior and Organization
Sea Power and Maritime Affairs
Leadership and Management
American Politics 1
The United States Congress
Interest Group Politics
Political Organizations
General Psychology
Introductory Social Psychology (ESSV2)
Health Psychology (ESSV2)
Psychology of Gender Roles
Introduction to Commercial Real Estate
Social Movements, Protest and Change (ESSV2)
Policy and Practice for Children Impacted by Incarceration (ESSV2)
Advocacy and Social Change: Theory and Practice (ESSV2)
Elective (ELE) - one additional course from any of the three content areas in this theme3
Total Credit Hours:12

Writing Intensive Courses (WRIT) - one course required

ACCO 4000Accounting Communications3
ADPR 2200Media Writing3
ANTH 2101Cultural Anthropology3
ARBC 3200Culture and Civilization of the Middle East (ESSV2)3
ARBC 3210Arabic Literature in English Translation3
ARBC 3220Arab and Muslim Women in the United States (ESSV2)3
BIOL 4102Experimental Molecular Biology3
BIOL 4202Experimental Genetics3
BIOL 4402Experimental Ecology and Field Biology3
BIOL 4403Tropical Ecology in Panama3
BIOL 4702Experimental Physiology3
BIOL 4802Experimental Microbiology3
BULA 3001Legal and Ethical Environment of Business3
BIOLI 4403Tropical Ecology in Panama3
CCOM 3250Corporate Writing3
CMST 3000Theories in Communication Studies3
CRLS 3050Methods of Criminological Research3
DGMD 3840Film and TV Aesthetics3
EDUC 4000Educational Inquiry 2: Advanced Topics3
EDUC 4540Philosophy of Education3
ELEN 3025Electrical Instrumentation Laboratory2
ENGL 2001Ways of Knowing (ESSV2)3
ENGL 2011Books that Matter3
ENGL 3000Introduction to Literary Studies3
ENGL 3210Writing Practices and Processes3
ENGL 3220Writing for Workplaces3
ENGL 3222Writing for Health and Medicine3
ENGL 3240Introduction to Creative Writing3
ENGL 3241Crafting the Short Story3
ENGL 3261Poetry and Community (ESSV2)3
ENGL 3301Here Be Monsters3
ENGL 3302Crossing Over3
ENGL 3462Introduction to Gothic Fiction3
ENGL 3513Modern Irish Literature3
ENGL 3751The Art of War3
ENGL 3762Disability and Literature3
ENGL 3780Water Is Life: Indigenous Art and Activism in Changing Climates (ESSV2)3
ENGL 3785LGBTQ+ Narratives: Literature, Film, Theory3
ENGL 3841Global Hip Hop3
ENGL 3860The Russian Novel and the Search for Meaning3
ENGL 4210Writing, Literacy, and Rhetoric Studies3
ENGL 4220Rhetorical Theories and Practices 13
ENGL 4221The Rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X (ESSV2)3
ENGL 4222Feminist Rhetorics (ESSV2)3
ENGL 4223The Rhetoric of Black Protest (ESSV2)3
ENGL 4224Radical Writing: An Invitation to the Self3
ENGL 4230Writing Center Theory, Practice and Research (ESSV2)4
ENGL 4250Creative Writing: Fiction3
ENGL 4260Creative Writing: Poetry3
ENGL 4303Studies in the Medieval Imagination3
ENGL 4311Themes in Medieval Literature3
ENGL 4331Shakespeare3
ENGL 4402The Novel to 19003
ENGL 4412Transatlantic Literature, 1700-19003
ENGL 4422British Literature of the Long 18th Century3
ENGL 4423Legal Fictions of the Enlightenment3
ENGL 4453Romanticism and Nature (ESSV2)3
ENGL 4472British Literature of the Victorian Period, 1837-19003
ENGL 4616Moby-Dick3
ENGL 4715Children's Literature3
ENGL 4730What Is a Book?3
ENGL 4734The Epic3
ENGL 4738Poetry3
ENGL 4755Law and Literature3
ENGL 4761Medicine and Literature3
ENGL 4765Material Cultures3
ENGL 4786Women Writers3
ENGL 4810Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies3
ENGL 4820Studies in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies3
ENGL 4825Native American / Indigenous Literatures (ESSV2)3
ENGL 4826Global Indigenous Literatures (ESSV2)3
ENGL 4830Africana Literatures3
ENGL 4932Topics in Writing3
ENGL 4954Seminar in Creative Writing3
ENGL 4997Capstone3
EXPH 4020Clinical Case Management in Exercise Science3
FREN 4110Advanced Grammar and Written Expression in French3
FREN 4270French Holocaust Writings in English Translation3
FREN 4280Creative Writing in French3
GRMN 3500The Modern German Short Story3
GRMN 3505The Modern German Short Story in English3
HIST 1301History of Latin America3
HIST 3104The Civil War Era3
HIST 4210The Black Death3
HIST 4460Race and History of South Africa3
HIST 4955Undergraduate Seminar in History3
JOUR 4150Investigative Reporting3
MANA 3002Business and Its Environment3
MLSC 4180Concepts in Clinical Education Methods and Practicum2
NURS 4000Quality and Safety in Nursing3
PHIL 3505Philosophy and Film3
PHIL 3610Ancient Philosophy3
PHIL 4540Philosophy of Education3
PHTH 7505Patient/Client Management 3 (with PHTH 7974)2
PHTH 7974Clinical Education Experience 1 (with PHTH 7505)4
POSC 3101Writing and Argumentation in Political Science3
PURE 3600Public Relations Writing3
SOCI 3050Methods of Social Research3
SPAN 3005Advanced Communication in Spanish for Heritage Speakers3
SPAN 3500Introduction to Literary Analysis in Spanish3
SPAN 3505Introduction to Literary Analysis in Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers3
SPAN 4700Creative Writing in Spanish3
STCM 3400Writing for Strategic Communication3
THAR 4600Playwriting3
THEO 3130Miracles 13
THEO 3530Theology and Economics 13
THEO 4210History and Theology of the Christian East3
THEO 4300The Question of God in a Secular Age 13
THEO 4460Religion, Science and Ethics3

Courses

CORE 1929. Foundations in Methods of Inquiry. 3 cr. hrs.

Compares and contrasts the approach of three different disciplines to a common theme. Asks students to reflect on what disciplinary methods they find most appealing or challenging, and why. Prereq: THEO 1001 or PHIL 1001; and Soph. stndg.

CORE 1929H. Honors Foundations in Methods of Inquiry. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Compares and contrasts the approach of three different disciplines to a common theme. Asks students to reflect on what disciplinary methods they find most appealing or challenging, and why. Completion of 3 credits satisfies the MCC Foundations in Methods of Inquiry requirement. As an Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

CORE 4929. The Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice. 3 cr. hrs.

Designed to integrate the Marquette core by emphasizing the reflection on and application of knowledge and skills developed in the core for life beyond Marquette University. Special focus on vocation and discernment invites students to evaluate their coursework at Marquette alongside their own worldview and transcendent commitments in order to identify ways they are uniquely equipped to work for justice in the world. A collaborative, interdisciplinary analysis of a lasting problem in the local or global community presents a test-case for this integration of academic experience and personal faith for the promotion of justice, providing the foundation for an analogical application to student’s lives and work after Marquette. Prereq: Jr. stndg.

CORE 4929H. Honors Service of Faith and Promotion of Justice. 3 cr. hrs.

Designed to integrate the Marquette core by emphasizing the reflection on and application of knowledge and skills developed in the core for life beyond Marquette University. Special focus on vocation and discernment invites students to evaluate their course work at Marquette alongside their own worldview and transcendent commitments in order to identify ways they are uniquely equipped to work for justice in the world. A collaborative, interdisciplinary analysis of a lasting problem in the local or global community presents a test-case for this integration of academic experience and personal faith for the promotion of justice, providing the foundation for an analogical application to student’s lives and work after Marquette. Core Honors students are required to take this course during the third or fourth year of their undergraduate career. Prereq: Sr. stndg. and Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.