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Chairperson: Susan K. Wood, SCL, Ph.D.
Department of Theology website

Mission

The Department of Theology concentrates on theological studies as distinguished from a purely empirical study of religion and from professional training for the ministry. Theology at Marquette explores faith and what it has to say about the fundamental purpose and meaning of all things, including our own existence. It seeks the deeper unity underlying all reality, its common origin and ultimate purpose.

The Department of Theology aims to help educate undergraduates by bringing them to an understanding of their respective faith commitments and traditions in harmony with their overall intellectual, critical and cultural development. The department also incorporates into Catholic theology an ecumenical dimension which was made normative by the Second Vatican Council, and which is regarded by the department as an essential service to the Church and the world. Theological questions evoke distinctive responses from the various religious perspectives represented in contemporary society. The department respects the various faith traditions of its students and works for mutual understanding among different faiths.

Program Goals

Students are able to take courses in Scripture, the history of Christian thought, Christian doctrine and world religions. They explore the relationship between faith and justice in accordance with the recent General Congregations of the Society of Jesus.

In the undergraduate program students will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic categories of theological reflection: Biblical, historical, systematic and ethical.
  • Analyze texts for their theological content according to their particular literary genres and historical contexts.
  • Use effective theological methods of research and argumentation.

Theology Curriculum

The University Core of Common Studies (UCCS) theology requirement for graduation is the six-hour sequence of two courses: THEO 1001 Introduction to Theology and any second-level course (THEO 2000 level) approved for inclusion in the UCCS (approved courses are listed in this bulletin); the Arts and Sciences College curriculum theology requirement is the full sequence of THEO 1001 Introduction to Theology, a second-level course and any third-level course (THEO 4000-4995). Students may choose as electives additional courses, beyond the requirements of their college, from both the second- and third-level offerings, if they have the proper prerequisites.

The comprehensive educational goal of the theology curriculum is theological literacy at the level legitimately expected of graduates of a Catholic university. Through investigation of various theological sources, this intellectual formation habituates students to approaches, responses and critiques appropriate to the academic discipline of theology, which is “faith seeking understanding.” Three specific objectives guide the theology curriculum. Every course is designed, first, to increase the student’s awareness of the mystery and religious dimensions of human life, particularly as conveyed in the basic narrative outline of salvation history — which characterizes the Christian worldview — from creation to fulfillment in Jesus Christ. This objective takes precedence in the first course, THEO 1001 Introduction to Theology; this first-level course introduces key sources and questions of theology, at the same time that it provides the student with a necessary knowledge base.

While cultivating the student’s growing base of factual knowledge, courses go on to provide the student with training in theological understanding, primarily through the reading and interpreting of significant texts. Second-level courses, with their objective of “Exploring Theological Texts and Interconnections” — especially regarding representations of God, religious community and the human person — are designed to develop the skills required for such understanding. The knowledge and skills garnered in second-level courses are essential background for enabling students to achieve the objectives of the third-level courses.

Third-level courses, by investigating particular theological topics with discipline-specific methods, develop in students the critical habit of seeing into the depth-dimension of reality in light of religious faith and its historical effects on human societies. A wide variety of third-level classes, all building on the first-level and the second-level courses, develop this critical habit in the student. Third-level offerings include interdisciplinary courses to investigate theological questions; courses that focus on a particular person, time period or topic; courses that examine the impact of religion on our daily lives and courses that explore non-Christian religious traditions. As the culmination of the three-course sequence, these courses aim to produce Jesuit university graduates who are able to discern the perennially significant in the complexity and conflicting values of modern life, “men and women for others,” intellectually prepared to “find God in all things.” Building on the achievements of the first-level and second-level courses, third-level courses aim in a special way to encourage students to become responsible citizens, drawn to the intellectual life, knowledgeable about their own religious traditions and appreciative of the religious beliefs and practices of others in the human community.

In all courses, theological issues are introduced and discussed with respect for others in keeping with the Declaration on Religious Liberty of the Second Vatican Council.

 

Note:

  • First Level (lower-division): Introductory Course - THEO 1001 Introduction to Theology
  • Second Level (lower-division): Exploring Theological Texts and Interconnections - THEO 2000-2999.
  • Third Level (upper-division): Exploring Theological Questions – THEO 3986; 4000-4999.

Major in Theology

The major in theology consists of 33 credit hours, which include a required introductory theology course (3 credit hours), one two-course sequence (6 credit hours) in Scripture, one course in each of the four theology areas (12 credit hours), three 4000 level theology electives (9 credit hours) and the capstone seminar in theology (3 credit hours), as listed below.

Required Courses:
THEO 1001Introduction to Theology3
Scripture Course Sequence - Choose one of the following sequences:6
Hebrew Scriptures: Old Testament Overview
   and New Testament Selected Books:
New Testament Overview
   and Hebrew Scriptures/Old Testament Selected Books:
Historical Theology - Choose one of the following courses:3
Religion and American Life
Theology in the Early Church
History and Theology of the Christian East
St. Augustine: The Man and the Theologian
Theology in the Middle Ages
Theology in the Reformation Era
Martin Luther
Theology in America
American Catholic Life and Thought
Studies in Historical Theology
Systematic Theology - Choose one of the following courses:3
Contemporary Atheism and Theism
Theology of the Holy Spirit
Jesus the Christ
Theology of the Church
Sacraments and Christian Life
The Eucharist
Christian Prayer and Mysticism
Protestant Thought and Practice
Studies in Systematic Theology
Ethics - Choose one of the following courses:3
Theology, Violence, and Nonviolence
Christian Faith and Justice
Christian Theology in Global Contexts
Family, Church, and Society
Theology and the Natural Sciences
Foundations of Ecological Ethics
Medical Ethics
Studies in Moral Theology
World Religions - Choose one of the following courses:3
The Bible in the Jewish Community
Christ and World Religions: Theology of Interreligious Dialogue
Survey of World Religions
Jewish Thought and Practice
Islam: Faith and Practice
Hinduism, Yoga, and Buddhism
Elective Courses - Choose three THEO 4000 level courses9
Capstone Seminar Required:
THEO 4997Capstone Seminar3
Total Credit Hours33

Notes:

  • Depending on a student’s preparation and educational needs, other courses may be substituted by approval of the departmental adviser, who may also suggest cognate courses in other departments.
  • Students preparing for graduate studies in theology are encouraged to begin courses in a necessary classical (Greek/Hebrew/Latin) or modern (French/German) language.

 

Major in Theology for Catholic School Ministry

This major is particularly focused on preparing future teachers of theology in Catholic high schools. Students taking this major are required to complete, in addition to a series of theology courses (36 credit hours), required courses in the College of Education’s teacher education sequence (19 credit hours). This major does not meet Wisconsin State DPI requirements for state certification for teaching.

At the conclusion of the program, each student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of Scripture, Church history, Catholic doctrine and ethics.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of and appreciation for the Catholic intellectual and theological tradition.
  3. Use critical tools in reading and interpreting the texts of the Christian tradition.
  4. Provide evidence for effective skills in oral and written communication.
  5. Demonstrate in practice knowledge of educational methods and effective skills sufficient for teaching at the high school level.

The major in theology for Catholic School Ministry consists of 36 credit hours, which include an introductory theology course (3 credit hours), seven required courses (21 credit hours), three third-level theology electives (9 credit hours) and the capstone seminar in theology (3 credit hours), as listed below.

Theology Course Requirements:
THEO 1001Introduction to Theology3
THEO 2000Hebrew Scriptures: Old Testament Overview3
THEO 2100New Testament Overview3
THEO 2210Theology Through the Centuries3
THEO 4320Jesus the Christ3
THEO 4330Theology of the Church3
THEO 4340Sacraments and Christian Life3
THEO 4490Studies in Moral Theology3
Capstone Seminar Requirement:
THEO 4997Capstone Seminar3
Elective courses - Choose three third-level courses 9
Total Credit Hours36

College of Education Requirements:
Recommended Freshman or Sophomore Year:
EDUC 1210Introduction to Schooling in a Diverse Society3
EDUC 1220Psychology of Human Development in Children and Adolescents in a Diverse Society3
Recommended Sophomore Year:
EDUC 2227Introduction to Learning and Assessment3
Recommended Junior Year:
EDUC 4037Literacy in the Content Areas3
EDUC 4297Teaching in the Middle School4
Recommended Senior Year:
EDUC 4067Strategies in Religious Education3
Total Credit Hours19

Notes:

  • In order to take EDUC 4037 Literacy in the Content Areas, EDUC 4067 Strategies in Religious Education, and EDUC 4297 Teaching in the Middle School, students must pass an examination administered through the College of Education.
  • This major does not meet Wisconsin State DPI requirements for state certification for teaching.

 

Minor in Theology

The minor in theology consists of six courses (18 credit hours); two of these courses may be lower-division, four courses must be upper-division.

Courses

THEO 1001. Introduction to Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Key sources and questions of theology as reflection upon the worldview and core narrative found in Christian tradition and scriptures. Includes orientation to the academic study of religion. Background in theology is not presupposed. Prerequisite to all other courses in theology.

THEO 2000. Hebrew Scriptures: Old Testament Overview. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the contents of the Hebrew Bible, its historical contexts and religious ideas. Includes analysis of selected texts from representative sections of the Old Testament and discussion of their various theological visions of God, the human person and the people of God in interrelationship. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2010. Hebrew Scriptures/Old Testament Selected Books:. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of a portion of the Old Testament in depth and with a focus on critical reading skills, as well as central theological questions (God, individual, community). Specific textual content varies by term, with possible focus on the Pentateuch, Prophets, and the other Writings. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2100. New Testament Overview. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the contents of the New Testament, its historical contexts and religious ideas. Includes analysis of selected texts from representative sections of the New Testament and discussion of their various theological visions of God, the human person and the people of God in interrelationship. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2110. New Testament Selected Books:. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of a portion of the New Testament in depth and with a focus on critical reading skills, as well as central theological questions (God, individual, church). Specific textual content varies by term, with possible focus on the synoptic gospels, the Johannine literature, or the Pauline letters. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2200. The Bible Through the Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Understandings and uses of the Bible in the history of Christianity. Revelation, Faith, Tradition, Scripture. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2210. Theology Through the Centuries. 3 cr. hrs.

Trinity, Incarnation and Salvation in the history of Christian thought over a substantial portion of its range. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2220. Good and Evil: Past and Present. 3 cr. hrs.

Human beings' religious and moral relationship with God and fellow creatures as illuminated by past Christian experience, in comparison with the present. Major emphasis on one or two historical eras (Early Church, Middle Ages, Byzantine, Reformation, Recent). Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2230. Theology in the Writings of C. S. Lewis. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the life and work of C. S. Lewis which focuses on theological themes in select writings of C. S. Lewis, including his understanding of God, the human person, and the life of faith as a moral challenge. The readings also bring to light Lewis's notion of "the Tao," by which he brought Christianity into dialogue with other religions and with emerging western secularism. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2250. Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius with an eye to discovering the spirituality found therein. Begins with the life of St. Ignatius of Loyola and ends with the famous Jesuit prayer, the Suscipe. Focuses on the introductory notes and the four weeks of the Spiritual Exercises and the special graces of each week. Topics found in the Spiritual Exercises include: the examen, finding God in all things, various methods of prayer and the discernment of spirits. Prereq: Soph. stndg., THEO 1001.

THEO 2300. Quests for God, Paths of Revelation. 3 cr. hrs.

The quest for God in human and specifically religious experiences with a focus on Christian belief in God. Grounds for belief; revelation; the nature of God's relationship to the world including issues relevant to modern culture and science. The historical precedents and context for these issues. The dialogue with other religious and atheistic conceptions of ultimate reality. Implications of a community's understanding of God for its way of life. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2310. Explorations in Christian Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of the meaning and interconnections of some of the central themes in Christian theology (e.g. Jesus Christ, Trinity, Church, Sacraments, Sin and Grace, Revelation). The historical and communal context for understanding these. Implications of these for understanding what it means to be human. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2320. The Event and Meaning of Vatican II. 3 cr. hrs.

The reasons for which this ecumenical council was called. The historical context in which it was celebrated from 1962 until 1965. The meaning of this council's documents for Christian conceptions of God, the human community, the Church, the world, and the interaction of all of these. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2400. Christian Discipleship. 3 cr. hrs.

The Christian identity of God as a God of Love and Justice. The divine and personal call to the human person to a life of holiness, faith, the virtues, especially justice; the preferential option for the poor; the role of community in the moral and spiritual life of individuals and Christian communities as agents for social change. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2410. Christian Faith in Cultural Contexts. 3 cr. hrs.

Religious experience and beliefs concerning God, human beings, and faith community as apprehended within a particular historically and culturally situated community or communities (e.g. African-American, Hispanic, Asian, or European). Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 2420. Bridging the Racial Divide. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of racism, ethnic tension, and theology from the perspective of "white privilege" and African American experience in American Christianity. Reflects on the intersection of these areas to discover, on the other hand, to discern how specific theological notions contribute positively or negatively to our understanding of race, ethnic tension and social justice. Prereq: THEO 1001 and soph. stndg.

THEO 2500. Theology, Violence, and Nonviolence. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the concepts of peace and nonviolence in the history of Catholicism, other Christian churches, and world religions. Examines the ideas and practices found in the Hebrew scriptures, the New Testament, Gandhi and Hinduism, and Buddhism. Covers topics such as just war, pacifism, nonviolent resistance and their spiritual foundations. Prereq: THEO 1001 and soph. stndg.

THEO 2530. Theology and Economics. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides skills for theological evaluation of economic theories and practices, particularly as they bear on the rise and ascendancy of the global market. Divided into three sections: 1) A history of economic thought traced from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes, with particular attention to their moral theory, underlying philosophy and its relationship to theology; 2) The tradition of economic thought within Christian theology, as a traced drawing on Scripture, tradition and Catholic social teaching; and 3) Contemporary theologians will be examined, who relate the Christian tradition to various economic theories and practices. Prereq: Soph. stndg. and THEO 1001.

THEO 3986. Internship in Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Practical learning to provide an intentional experience of pastoral service and leadership in a ministry-related setting. Students will apply the theology, concepts, and skills learned in the classroom by integrating study with pastoral praxis at an approved site and developing competencies in the areas of pastoral theology and ministry. Requires a commitment of a minimum of 10 hours per week at an approved site during the academic term and attendance at a group seminar. Students must have declared a major or a minor in Theology, completed at least 3 courses (9 cr. hrs.) in Theology and have a minimum 3.000 cum. GPA to be eligible. The student must complete an application for the internship. Selection is based on academic credentials, extracurricular experience, and a written essay. May be taken only once. Grade is determined by seminar participation, written work, evaluation of work performance at the student's site, and a final assignment. S/U grade assessment. Limited enrollment. Prereq: Jr. stndg., and consent of instructor.

THEO 4000. Digging the Bible: Archeology and Biblical Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

An exploration of the uses and abuses of archeology relative to the field of biblical studies. Case studies in a historical approach to the intersection of archeology and biblical theology. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4020. The Bible in the Jewish Community. 3 cr. hrs.

The uses of the Bible in Jewish life and practice, in synagogue and in private use. Haggadah and Halakah. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4030. Women in the Bible. 3 cr. hrs.

Status and roles of women in selected biblical texts. Social and historical background with emphasis on narrative technique and theological themes. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4130. Religion and American Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey the historical impact of religious belief and institutions on the intellectual, cultural, and public life of the United States. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001 and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4190. Studies in Biblical Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant topics in Old Testament, Intertestamental, or New Testament literature. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4200. Theology in the Early Church. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the era of the Church Fathers. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4210. History and Theology of the Christian East. 3 cr. hrs.

The Christian East from its origins, through the conversion of Constantine, to the present-day Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Churches. Particular attention to the distinctive theological emphases of the East, as well as to the developments leading to the break in communion between Catholic (and Protestant) West and Orthodox East. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4220. St. Augustine: The Man and the Theologian. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of Augustine's life, writings and thought, with special attention to the Confessions, to his theology of the church and the sacraments, and to his teaching on grace and predestination, against the background of his early philosophical writings. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4230. Theology in the Middle Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the Middle Ages, from the Carolingians to the fourteenth century. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4240. Theology in the Reformation Era. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the late Middle Ages and early Reformation. Current ecumenical issues also addressed. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4250. Martin Luther. 3 cr. hrs.

The thought and world of Luther, with emphasis on Luther in his Catholic context; Luther and the Bible, Augustine, the Radicals, the Pope; Luther's theology of faith and freedom; contextual, theological and ethical. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4260. Theology in America. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments from Puritanism to the present. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4270. American Catholic Life and Thought. 3 cr. hrs.

Analyzes the development of American Catholic life and thought from the colonial establishment to the present. Investigates in particular how clergymen, theologians, and laypersons came to terms with the difficulties and benefits of being Catholic in the United States. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4290. Studies in Historical Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant figures and themes in the history of religious thought, examined in their historical context and contemporary significance. Topics and periods vary. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4300. Contemporary Atheism and Theism. 3 cr. hrs.

Origins and varieties of contemporary atheism. The existence of God and Christian theistic interpretations. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4310. Theology of the Holy Spirit. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the distinct mission and person of the Holy Spirit in the Trinitarian work of human salvation. Analysis of biblical, patristic, and conciliar sources; attention to modern theology and the role of experience. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4320. Jesus the Christ. 3 cr. hrs.

The identity of Jesus Christ and the nature of Christian salvation as attested to in the New Testament and Christian tradition. Historical Jesus and diversity of christologies in the New Testament. Humanity and divinity of Christ. The saving significance of Christ's life, death, and resurrection. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4330. Theology of the Church. 3 cr. hrs.

The Church in light of the documents, events, and charism of Vatican II. Contemporary understandings of the Church and its mission in the modern world. Special attention to post-conciliar "communion ecclesiology" and the relation of the local to the universal Church. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4340. Sacraments and Christian Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological overview of the major sacramental enactments of the church's life in Christ. The witness of Scripture and Tradition, including the liturgy itself. Ethical and ecumenical dimensions. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4350. The Eucharist. 3 cr. hrs.

Biblical origins and historical evolution of the Eucharist in light of contemporary theology and ritual theory, with special focus on the Roman Rite Catholic post-Vatican II celebration. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4360. Christian Prayer and Mysticism. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to some of the main currents in the Christian tradition of prayer and mysticism. Origins in Scripture and the early church. Main lines of development in both Eastern and Western traditions, with a focus on the Catholic tradition. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4370. Protestant Thought and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Major perspectives within the broad spectrum of Protestantism. Examination of the thought of several Protestant theologians. A survey of the unity and diversity of several Protestant denominations and their respective forms of worship. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4390. Studies in Systematic Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant movements and/or major figures in contemporary systematic theology. Their historical antecedents and cultural context. Specific topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4400. Christian Faith and Justice. 3 cr. hrs.

Classic and recent Christian understandings of justice as interpersonal and societal right-relations. Justice as constitutive aspect of the Gospel; love and justice; Christian responsibility in the face of injustice. Further issues, e.g. sexual and gender ethics, political and economic issues. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4405. Christian Theology in Global Contexts. 3 cr. hrs.

The reception of the Christian gospel in diverse cultures throughout the world. The challenge of inculturation and the requirements of the unity of Christian faith. The meaning of mission and evangelization outside the West. The encounter with indigenous religions. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4410. Family, Church, and Society. 3 cr. hrs.

The interaction of family, church, and society. Contemporary family patterns, their strengths and stresses; the teachings, reflection, and pastoral responses of the Church concerning marriage and family. Ecclesial and societal implications of family as "domestic church." Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4430. Theology and the Natural Sciences. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological analysis of the historical relationship between religion and the natural sciences; exploration of models for relating the two disciplines today; reflection on the theological implications of contemporary scientific discoveries and theories. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4440. Foundations of Ecological Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of religious foundations for ecological ethics, with a focus on the Catholic tradition and social teachings; application to contemporary ecological problems. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4450. Medical Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Health care practices under moral assessment from within the Christian tradition. Controversial topics facing medicine (issues of the beginning and end of life, assisted reproduction, etc.) as related to Christian moral principles. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4490. Studies in Moral Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Selected issues in contemporary moral life; selected themes from classical and contemporary writings in moral theology and Christian ethics. Topics vary, as specified in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4500. Christ and World Religions: Theology of Interreligious Dialogue. 3 cr. hrs.

Global pluralism of religions considered from perspectives of Christian faith. Methods and case studies of theological dialogue with particular religious traditions, e.g. Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4510. Survey of World Religions. 3 cr. hrs.

An overview of the major religious traditions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, religions of China and Japan, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4520. Jewish Thought and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Meaning of Jewish history. Philosophical and social understanding of the Jewish experience. Ruling ideas, myths, symbols, and rites. Partially funded by the Jewish Chautauqua Society. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4530. Islam: Faith and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Major trends of Islamic religious thought, practice, and worship. Readings from the Qur'an and other Islamic writings. Historical approach. Current issues and developments. Islam in the West. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4540. Hinduism, Yoga, and Buddhism. 3 cr. hrs.

Religious experience, cultic act, religious organization, theological formulation, as illustrated by two religions of India, Hinduism and Buddhism. Yoga as spiritual discipline. Historical approach. Readings from sacred writings. Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, and one second-level theology course.

THEO 4951. MU Led Travel/Study Abroad. 3 cr. hrs.

Course taught in an international setting by Marquette professors and where students earn Marquette credit. Study Abroad expenses apply.

THEO 4995. Independent Study in Theology. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Jr. stndg., THEO 1001, one second-level theology course, and cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 4997. Capstone Seminar. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of a theological topic involving issues of theological method and interrelatedness of the subdisciplines of biblical, historical, systematic and moral theology. Colloquium paper demonstrating critical analysis in a specific field. Prereq: Sr. stndg., THEO 1001, one second-level theology course, and cons. of dept. ch.