Chairperson: Lowell Barrington, Ph.D.
Department of Political Science website

Studying politics offers a way to understand and engage in some of the most critical issues of our times. Our country’s political processes are deeply divided, and our institutions suffer partisanship and gridlock. Our media, too, often substitute hyperbole for reasonable discussion. Our economy continues to struggle to respond to the challenges of globalization and to distribute economic gains across American society. Meanwhile newly rising economies give other countries increasing power. As we wind down the major wars of the last decade, we continue to face threats ranging from global environmental problems to terrorism. The Political Science department offers courses that engage these and other timely issues. Students can choose to specialize in American politics, law and politics, global politics, political economy and public policy or general politics. These concentrations draw from courses in American politics, comparative politics, international politics and political philosophy. We offer hands-on experience in local internships and a semester program in Washington D.C., at the Les Aspin Center. And our extensive alumni network can help graduating students start careers in fields as diverse as law; federal, state, and local government; electoral politics; intelligence; business; and international and domestic community service.

The department offers a major in Political Science with five different concentrations, a minor in Political Science, a major and minor for students in the College of Education pursuing a teaching specialization in political science, and an accelerated, five-year B.A./M.A. degree in Political Science. Students might also or alternatively consider an interdisciplinary major, minor or accelerated five-year B.A./M.A. degree in International Affairs.

Major in Political Science

The major in political science consists of 33 credit hours of political science courses. Students must complete one of the five concentrations listed below.

Notes:

  • Students must take two additional non-POSC social science courses. This requirement can be satisfied by taking any two courses that have one or more of the following subject codes: ANTH, CRLS, ECON, PSYC, SOCI, or SOWJ. Courses with the ANTH subject code must be in the area of cultural anthropology rather than biological anthropology.
  • Students may count an introductory course (POSC 2201, POSC 2401, POSC 2601, or POSC 2801) as a Political Science elective, provided it is not already counting as a required Political Science course.
  • Students may take up to 6 credit hours of POSC 4995 Independent Study in Political Science with department approval.
  • Students enrolled in the Les Aspin Washington Center for Government program may count a maximum of nine credit hours in political science taken in the program toward the major.

Concentration I: Politics

Required Courses:
POSC 2201American Politics3
POSC 2401Comparative Politics3
POSC 2601International Politics3
POSC 2801Justice and Power3
Choose seven upper-division POSC courses (4101 to 4999). These must include one course each from at least 3 of the 4 Groups (I-IV) listed below:21
Group I: American Politics (POSC courses numbered 4201-4376)
Group II: Comparative Politics (POSC courses numbered 4406-4561)
Group III: International Politics (POSC courses numbered 4601-4741)
Group IV: Political Theory (POSC courses numbered 4801-4881)
Total Credit Hours33

Concentration II: Law and Politics

Required Courses:
POSC 2201American Politics3
POSC 2801Justice and Power3
Choose one of the following courses:3
Comparative Politics
International Politics
Choose three of the following courses:9
American Constitutional Law and Development
The Politics of Civil Rights and Liberties
Courts and Public Policy
International Law
The Politics of Human Rights
Choose one course from Group IV (POSC courses numbered 4801-4899)3
Choose four additional POSC courses12
Total Credit Hours33

Concentration III: Global Politics

Required Courses:
POSC 2201American Politics3
POSC 2401Comparative Politics3
POSC 2601International Politics3
Choose two POSC courses from Group II (POSC courses numbered 4401-4599):6
Choose two POSC courses from Group III (POSC courses numbered 4601-4699):6
Choose four additional POSC courses, including at least one course from either Group I (POSC courses numbered 4201-4399) or Group IV (POSC courses numbered 4801-4899)12
Total Credit Hours33

Concentration IV: Political Economy and Public Policy

Choose three of the following POSC courses:9
American Politics
Comparative Politics
International Politics
Justice and Power
Choose four of the following POSC courses:12
Business and Politics
Politics of American Capitalism
Politics, Economics, and Democracy
Politics of the World Economy
Politics of the Illicit Global Economy
The Political Economy of Development
The Political Philosophy of Capitalism
Choose four additional POSC courses12
Required cognate courses:
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Total Credit Hours33

Concentration V: American Politics

Required Course:
POSC 2201American Politics3
Choose two of the following POSC courses:6
Comparative Politics
International Politics
Justice and Power
Choose three of the following POSC courses:9
The United States Congress
The American Presidency
American Political Parties
Elections, Public Opinion and Participation
American Public Policy
American Constitutional Law and Development
Choose five additional POSC courses, including at least one course from Group II (POSC courses numbered 4401-4599), Group III (POSC courses numbered 4601-4799), OR Group IV (POSC courses numbered 4801-4899).15
Total Credit Hours33

Department of Public Instruction Certification - Political Science Major

College of Education students pursuing Department of Public Instruction Certification should note that persons holding Wisconsin's Broad Field Social Studies license will be qualified to teach political science, if they complete 9 credit hours in political science.

Students pursuing certification with a political science major must complete 33 credit hours of political science courses as specified in Concentration I, with the exception that they should complete one upper-division course in all four of the groups listed. It is important that prospective teachers carefully review the College of Education section of this bulletin and consult with their Political Science Department adviser regarding university and state requirements (in addition to department requirements) for teacher certification.

Required Courses:
POSC 2201American Politics3
POSC 2401Comparative Politics3
POSC 2601International Politics3
POSC 2801Justice and Power3
Choose four upper-division POSC courses, one from each of the Groups (I-IV) listed below: 12
Group I: American Politics (POSC courses numbered 4201-4376)
Group II: Comparative Politics (POSC courses numbered 4406-4561)
Group III: International Politics (POSC courses numbered 4601-4741)
Group IV: Political Theory (POSC courses numbered 4801-4881)
Electives: Choose three upper-division POSC courses9
Total Credit Hours33

Political Science B.A./M.A. Accelerated Degree Program

The Political Science Department offers a five-year B.A./M.A. in Political Science. Students admitted to this program, may count a number of courses taken during their senior year toward both the B.A. and the M.A. degrees. This enables a student to complete both a B.A. and a M.A. in five years instead of the six that would normally be required.

The M.A. programs in political science offer courses that can take a student far beyond the undergraduate level. Those who have completed our M.A. degree have gone on to some of the finest graduate schools, launched careers in a variety of government agencies and gained employment in various settings in the private sector.

Graduate courses in our program offer students the possibility to pursue topics of interest to them in more depth than they are able to in undergraduate classes. These courses couple smaller class sizes and more opportunities for participation with an emphasis on the refinement of student research skills.

Minor in Political Science

The minor in political science consists of six courses (18 credit hours): four required courses (12 credit hours) and two elective courses (6 credit hours) as listed below:

Required Courses:
POSC 2201American Politics3
POSC 2401Comparative Politics3
POSC 2601International Politics3
POSC 2801Justice and Power3
Electives: Choose two additional POSC courses6
Total Credit Hours18

 

Department of Public Instruction Certification - Political Science Minor

College of Education students wishing to pursue Department of Public Instruction Certification must complete eight courses (24 credit hours): four required courses (12 credit hours) and four upper-division elective courses (12 credit hours) from Group I-IV as listed below:

Required Courses:
POSC 2201American Politics3
POSC 2401Comparative Politics3
POSC 2601International Politics3
POSC 2801Justice and Power3
Group I: Choose one upper-division course3
Group II: Choose one upper-division course3
Group III: Choose one upper-division course3
Group IV: Choose one upper-division course3
Total Credit Hours24

Courses

POSC 2201. American Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Problems of organizing and using governmental power at the national level. The principles of the U.S. Constitution. The Presidency, Congress and the federal judiciary. Public opinion, elections, political parties and interest groups. Issues of public policy.

POSC 2201H. Honors American Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Problems of organizing and using governmental power at the national level. The principles of the U.S. Constitution. The Presidency, Congress and the federal judiciary. Public opinion, elections, political parties and interest groups. Issues of public policy. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

POSC 2401. Comparative Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Types of government, ranging from democratic to totalitarian. The parliamentary alternative to presidential democracy. Political modernization and revolution.

POSC 2401H. Honors Comparative Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Types of government, ranging from democratic to totalitarian. The parliamentary alternative to presidential democracy. Political modernization and revolution. As a Honors Program course, includes a more intensive research or project component. Prereq: Admission to Marquette University Honors Program.

POSC 2601. International Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Patterns of interaction among nations and subnational and supranational entities. Cooperation and conflict. National interest, elements of power and war. Morality and human rights issues; economic, environmental, and resource issues in world politics. Recent developments and their impact.

POSC 2801. Justice and Power. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the difference between justice and power with special reference to the authority of a higher law or principle of right; selections from the works of Thucydides, Plato, Machiavelli and others are read.

POSC 3953. Undergraduate Seminar. 3 cr. hrs.

Designed to initiate a selected group of qualified undergraduates in the techniques and discipline of scholarly research by concentrated work in a restricted field. Students pursue course reading in preparation of reports, while working under close supervision of a professor. Course intended primarily for Political Science majors, but other qualified students may apply. Specific subjects of seminars to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prereq: Jr. stndg. and cons. of instr.

POSC 4191. The Logic of Social Inquiry: The Kennedy Assassination. 3 cr. hrs.

The Kennedy Assassination. The question of who killed President John F. Kennedy, and whether there was a conspiracy. The physical evidence; eyewitness testimony; Lee Harvey Oswald, Jack Ruby, and suspected conspirators. The logic of social inquiry, and how we can approach "conspiracy" as an hypothesis to be tested. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4193. Environmental Politics and Policy. 3 cr. hrs.

Tackles the key political and policy debates surrounding the many dimensions of environmental issues, to include global human security to local pollution controls. Focuses on a core set of debates that frame intellectual and practical approaches to solving environmental challenges. Prereq: POSC 2201 or POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4195. Politics of the Internet. 3 cr. hrs.

The origins and growth of the Internet. Legal and regulatory dilemmas posed by the Internet. The impact of the Internet on politics, society and economics. Prereq: POSC 2201 or POSC 2401 or POSC 2601 or POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4201. The United States Congress. 3 cr. hrs.

Membership, legislative process, and internal distribution of power in the U.S. Congress. Congressional relationships with the presidency, executive bureaucracy, interest groups, and public. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4211. The American Presidency. 3 cr. hrs.

The evolution and contemporary status of the American presidency. Presidential elections, policy-making, advisory systems, and relationships with Congress, the bureaucracy, and the courts. Problems and techniques of decision making. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4212. American Political Parties. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the nature and development of American political parties. Traces continuity and change in the American party system beginning in the early Republic, assessing the rise and fall of the Whigs, the dynamic between machine politics and progressive reform, and the shifts in party ideas and policy stances that inform contemporary political debates. The question of ideological change in American political parties is further explored by contemporary work on factions, polarization, and culture war. Assesses changes to the parties as organizations in the wake of reforms to the candidate selection process from an institutional perspective. Explores the question of how American political parties compare to their counterparts in other advanced industrial democracies. Prereq: POSC or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4213. Elections, Public Opinion and Participation. 3 cr. hrs.

Covers explanations for political behavior at the individual, group, and national levels. Begins with an examination of public opinion and political attitudes, followed by questions about voter turnout, political participation, and theories of voter choice. Culminates in a unit exploring perspective on how to explain and interpret election outcomes. Prereq: POSC 2201or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4216. American Public Policy. 3 cr. hrs.

U.S. domestic policy with special attention to the politics of national policy in the areas of the economy, social welfare, and the environment. The stages of the policy process: agenda-building, formation, budgeting, implementation, and evaluation. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4221. Interest Group Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

How groups are organized around particular economic interests and political preferences in order to influence policy-making institutions. The internal incentive structure of political organizations, including business, professional, trade union, and "public interest" groups. Functions of, and biases inherent in, the group process. Offered only at Les Aspin Center. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4231. Political Organizations. 3 cr. hrs.

Political parties, social movements, interest groups, and civic associations. How citizens organize themselves to participate in the political process. How democratic institutions resolve the tension between individual citizenship and collective action. Explores theories of mobilization, questions of influence, and explanations of success. Prereq: POSC 2201; or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4241. American Constitutional Law and Development. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the historical development of American constitutional law and politics, including the areas of judicial review, separation of powers, federalism, the powers of Congress and the presidency, and the rise and decline of due process property rights. Explores the judiciary’s role in constructing constitutional law and how this role has been contested over time. Considers how political institutions and forces, in addition to the judiciary, have shaped American constitutionalism. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4251. The Politics of Civil Rights and Liberties. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of civil rights and liberties policies in the United States, with an emphasis on the development of these policies over the course of American political history. Explores how the Supreme Court’s contribution to this development is connected with the broader historical and political context in which it sits. The Court does not play an exclusive role in this process. Expanding, contracting, or otherwise altering the meaning of a right or a liberty involves a range of political actors in a variety of venues. Coverage includes free speech, religious freedom, political participation, privacy, criminal procedures and the rights of minority groups and women. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4276. Courts and Public Policy. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the role and influence of courts in shaping American public policy, particularly from the 1950s to the present. Includes consideration of key institutional characteristics of the judiciary, the influence of law and politics on judicial decisionmaking, the interaction between the courts and other political branches, the reasons for the courts' emergence as battlegrounds in public policy problems. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4281. Urban Public Policy. 3 cr. hrs.

Conditions in American cities and the extent to which they can be improved by political activity. Race relations, ethnicity and class and their effects on housing, education and income. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4291. Urban Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Urban governmental structures and techniques of gaining power in urban areas. The role of elected and appointed officials, political parties, economic elites, neighborhood organizations, and ethnic groups in urban politics. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4321. Business and Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Business participation in the policy making process. Business as a political actor. The regulation of business. Political influence of business. Constraints on business power. Business politics in historical perspective. Prereq: POSC 2201; or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4331. Politics and Regulation. 3 cr. hrs.

Economic and social regulation in America. Why we have regulations. Who is regulated. Who does the regulating. What the consequences of regulation are. Primary focus on business regulation and related topics. Prereq: POSC 2201; or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4341. Politics of American Capitalism. 3 cr. hrs.

Political economy of U.S. history. Individuals, firms, and business associations and their role in politics. Economic development and conflict as sources of political change. Prereq: POSC 2201; or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4346. Politics of the American Civil War. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the American Civil War (1861-1865) as a crisis provoked by unresolved constitutional issues concerning nullification and secession, tariffs and the status of slavery. Readings include primary source material, select documents and speeches composed by leading statesmen from the time of the founding until 1866. Prereq: POSC 2201 or POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg. or cons. of instr.

POSC 4361. Politics of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender. 3 cr. hrs.

The role of African-Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics, white ethnics, American Indians, and women in shaping American politics through elections, political parties, and public office. The nature and impact of political organizations representing these groups. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4366. Religion and Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Religion and politics in contemporary America. The historic patterns and current interactions of religious movements, denominations, and individuals involved in American politics. Specific attention given to the rationales used for religious involvement in politics, the types of political behavior employed, and the consequences of that behavior. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4371. Media and Politics in the U.S.. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores role and power of media in American political systems; history and development of national press, including court interpretations of freedom of the press; quality and impact of political reporting, with emphasis on election coverage; and media's relationships with other political actors. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4376. American National Security Policy. 3 cr. hrs.

Defense policy processes in the United States; issues in defense decision-making, including the roles of the public, interest groups, Congress, the President, and executive agencies, with emphasis on the defense establishment; U.S. strategic doctrines since World War II; budgeting; civil-military relations. Prereq: POSC 2201 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4381. Politics of U.S. Health Care. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the American health care system, health care policies, and underlying politics. Provides an overview of the organization and financing of health care in the United States. Examines the impact of the political system, political parties and interest groups, and values on the health care system and health policies at national and state levels. Covers health care reform politics, including the Democrats’ 2010 Affordable Care Act and Republican reform alternatives. Also focuses on the social determinants of health and policies for vulnerable populations. Same as BISC 4381. Prereq: Jr. stndg.

POSC 4406. Public Policy in Industrial Democracies. 3 cr. hrs.

Politics of public policies in democratic political systems, with special attention to North America, Western Europe, and Japan. Alternative theoretical perspectives on the problem of social choice in democracies. Problems and policies in the areas of the economy, education, health, welfare, and the environment. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4411. Politics, Economics, and Democracy. 3 cr. hrs.

The relationship between capitalism and democracy. The impact of economic factors on politics. The political consequences of the organization and power of private business. The impact of democratic politics and political institutions on economic actors and performance in capitalists democracies. Prereq: POSC 2401; or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4421. Democracy, Authoritarianism, and Totalitarianism. 3 cr. hrs.

Three "ideal types" of political systems, and their manifestations in countries at different points in time. Topics include power, legitimacy, ruling elites, institution, and economics. Examination of political system change through coup, revolution, and peaceful transition. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4431. Modern Revolutions. 3 cr. hrs.

Types and causes of revolutions. Modern case studies. The American, French, Russian, German and selected "Third World" revolutions, with attention to ideas, institutions, socio-economic conditions, and the nature of actual changes. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4441. Designing Liberal Democracy. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploring liberal democracy in theory practice, especially as concerns emerging democracies in the developing world. Includes consideration of the impact of economic development, ethnicity, language, Legacies of colonialism and/or indigenous political organization, internal democracy, corruption, strategic location and institutional design. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4451. Comparative Judicial Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides a detailed introduction to the empirical and normative debates surrounding judicial power including origins of judicial review, courts as strategic actors and the development of stronger courts over time in American and comparative context. Focuses on the development of rule of law, and in particular, how the court as a governing institution interacts with legislative and executive powers. POSC 4241 recommended.

POSC 4461. Comparative Health Politics and Policy. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores through comparative analysis the ways in which different nations address the goals of equitable access, affordability and quality in health care. Considers the similarities and differences in health policy challenges facing rich and developing nations. Employs comparative analysis of different models of health care provisions and financing, and examines the underlying politics of health care systems and policies in different countries. Prereq: Jr. stndg.

POSC 4501. European Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Nationalism and European identity; evolution of executive and legislative institutions; political parties; ongoing changes in the welfare state and state socialism; transformation of class structure; the challenge of post-industrial society. Include both Eastern and Western Europe. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4511. Russian and Post-Soviet Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Developments in Russia and the other countries which emerge from the collapse of the Soviet Union. Brief coverage of tsarist and Soviet politics, with a particular emphasis on reasons for the USSR's collapse and Soviet legacies, followed by an overview of domestic and international politics in the region. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4521. Chinese Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Origins of the Chinese Revolution, political change and conflict in post-1949 China, and the contemporary political system and political developments. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4541. Latin American Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Government and politics in major Latin American countries. The politics of social change and development, seizures of power and rule by the military, and the role of external factors. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4561. Politics of the Developing World. 3 cr. hrs.

Politics of agricultural development, industrialization, military intervention, and social and cultural conflict in Third World Countries. Prereq: POSC 2401 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4601. International Law. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces students to the theoretical frameworks, empirical cases, and cutting-edge debates in the field of international law. Focuses on different theoretical perspectives for understanding international law. Examines the general principles of international law, including actors of international law, the creation and interpretation of international law, and the relationship between international law and domestic law. Explores several specialized areas of international law, such as human rights, environment, international criminal justice, trade, and the use of force. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4611. International Organizations. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces students to the theoretical frameworks, empirical cases, and cutting-edge debates in the field of international organizations. Focuses on different theoretical perspectives for understanding international organizations. Examines the effects of international organizations in world politics, such as the role of international organizations in fostering interstate cooperation, the power of international organizations in shaping state interests and identities, the pathologies of international organizations as global bureaucracies, and the interactions between international organizations and other non-state actors like nongovernmental organizations. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4621. Politics of the World Economy. 3 cr. hrs.

Political and economic dynamics of the world economy; historical and theoretical roots; international trade and monetary relations and the impact of hegemony, interdependence, regimes, and domestic politics; trade, debt, multinational corporations, and the dynamics of dependency and development; communism, capitalism, and change. Prereq: ECON 2004 and POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4631. World Conflict and Security. 3 cr. hrs.

Classical and contemporary theories of war and peace; just and unjust wars; principles of strategic analysis, arms control, and security policy-making; the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. The international trade in arms; nationalism, ethnic conflict, and wars of secession. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4633. Human Security. 3 cr. hrs.

What is human security? What happens when we label a social, economic or political problem a ‘human security’ issue? Notions of security now include a broader range of concerns, from the structural violence of poverty to the impact of crime, migration, disease epidemics and climate change. Traces the normative, political and intellectual history of this policy lens, and examines its real world implications across several key issue areas. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. Stndg.

POSC 4636. Terrorism. 3 cr. hrs.

Why do militant groups employ terrorist methods? What forces or pressures drive militant leaders to employ such controversial forms of violence in pursuit of their aims? Study what terrorists do, and why they do it, and formulate answers to these questions. Develop and apply alternative theories or lenses through which militant groups can be analyzed. Examine case studies of diverse domestic and foreign militant groups. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4641. Politics of the Illicit Global Economy. 3 cr. hrs.

Political and economic dynamics of the illicit dimension of the global economy; historical and theoretical roots; state efforts to control illicit flows of goods and services including drug trafficking, arms smuggling, illegal migration, traffic in women and children, money laundering; exploration of transnational organized crime as a challenge to state power. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4643. Human Trafficking. 3 cr. hrs.

Patterns of human trafficking, and local, national, international and global responses. Traces the historical, political, economic and social drivers of human trafficking and anti-trafficking efforts. Explores the transatlantic slave trade, white slave trade, comfort women and modern-day challenges of sex, labor and organ trafficking. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4651. The Politics of Human Rights. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces students to the theoretical frameworks, empirical cases, policy instruments and cutting-edge debates in the field of human rights. Examines different theoretical perspectives for understanding human rights, the philosophical foundations and historical origins of human rights, various mechanisms and actors for promoting and protecting human rights, the trajectory and effectiveness of humanitarian intervention and various forms of transitional justice. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4661. The Political Economy of Development. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces interaction between politics and economics in developing countries by examining political and economic development (and underdevelopment) through the lenses of the principal theoretical debates and substantive issues. Areas of inquiry include the general theories that underpin the study of the processes of economic and political reform, the roles of international and domestic institutions, and the influence of private interests including business, labor and civil society organizations. Substantive issues include poverty, conflict, human rights, foreign aid, investment and the environment. Prereq: ECON 2004 and either POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4701. United States Foreign Policy. 3 cr. hrs.

Objectives of American foreign policy. Problems facing the United States in its relations with other countries. Trade, aid, propaganda and alliances as instruments of foreign policy. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4711. International Politics of Europe. 3 cr. hrs.

Evolution of the post-war settlement in Europe. Western European and Eastern European integration, relations between Western and Eastern Europe, Europe and the superpowers, French-German and intra-German relations, Europe and the Third World, European security issues. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4721. International Politics of the Middle East. 3 cr. hrs.

Historical and religious background of Middle East politics; comparative ideologies and political systems in the Middle East; Arab-Israeli relations; Persian Gulf politics; politics in the Maghreb; great power interests in the region. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4731. International Politics of Asia. 3 cr. hrs.

Principal patterns and problems of international politics in Asia, including international political economy, development and security issues, and the impact of global trends. Regional focus varies with instructor. Prereq: POSC 2401 or POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4741. United States-Latin American Relations. 3 cr. hrs.

United States response to reform and revolutionary movements and governments in Latin America. The politics of trade, foreign investment, foreign assistance, and human rights. Prereq: POSC 2601 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4801. Citizens, Beasts, or Gods?. 3 cr. hrs.

Evaluates the comparative congeniality to mankind of pre-political 'states of nature,' political citizenship, and the life of philosophy; selections from the works of Rousseau, Nietzsche, Chesterton and Aristotle are read. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4811. The Best Constitution. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the relationship between constitutional design and human flourishing; selections from the works of Plato and others are read. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4812. Ethics and Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines whether the good life we seek by forming and abiding in political communities is to be found chiefly in enjoying pleasure, in winning honor, or in contemplating truth. Is moral virtue a necessary condition of living well, or can standards of justice sometimes be compromised for citizens to partake more fully in the good life? Just what is virtue and how might it be fostered? Readings include Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, as well as Machiavelli’s Prince and Plato’s Meno. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4813. Nietzsche and Christianity. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines Friedrich Nietzsche’s penetrating analysis of the contemporary crisis of Western Civilization, as well as his more dubious first principles of the “will to Power” and the “eternal return,” in juxtaposition with G.K. Chesterton’s and Josef Pieper’s celebration of Christian orthodoxy. Readings include Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil, Chesterton’s Orthodoxy and Pieper’s In Tune with the World. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4821. Democracy and Its Problems. 3 cr. hrs.

Diagnoses the instability of popular governments in antiquity and considers the remedy provided by the American constitutional republic; selections from the works of Thucydides, Publius, Tocqueville and others. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4841. Enlightenment Political Thought. 3 cr. hrs.

The Enlightenment's contribution to modern doctrines of individual rights, representative government, popular sovereignty, free enterprise, religious toleration, and freedom of speech. Authors such as Locke, Voltaire, Hume, Publius, Rousseau and Burke. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4851. Karl Marx. 3 cr. hrs.

Primary works on freedom and alienation, history, capitalism, revolution, and socialism that have inspired Marxist movements. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4861. The Political Philosophy of Capitalism. 3 cr. hrs.

Is capitalist society just or unjust? Does capitalism promote or inhibit the realization of freedom? Does capitalism promote or inhibit the pursuit of human excellence? Authors such as Rousseau, Adam Smith, Marx, Weber. Prereq: POSC 2801; or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4871. Politics and Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the central questions of political philosophy through the lens of literature, with special focus on how literature approaches the questions of the best regime and the best type of human life. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4881. Postmodern Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

Nietzsche and his successors on the insufficiency of modern ethics and modern politics since the Enlightenment. Focus on the postmodern critique of modernity's contributions to consumerism, globalization and technology. Prereq: POSC 2801 or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4931. Topics in Political Science. 2-3 cr. hrs.

Lectures and discussion in a broad area which, because of its topicality, is not the subject of a regular course. May be taken a maximum of three times. Prereq: Jr. stndg.

POSC 4951. MU Led Travel/Study Abroad. 3 cr. hrs.

Course taught in an international setting by Marquette professors and where students earn Marquette credit. Study Abroad expenses apply.

POSC 4986. Internship in Political Science. 3 cr. hrs.

Practical learning experience in politics through the Les Aspin Program. Evaluation will require the student to relate the experience to literature on the subject. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: POSC 2201; admitted to the Les Aspin Center for Government program.

POSC 4987. Internships as Field Experience. 3 cr. hrs.

For students who are completing or have just completed an internship. Through readings, discussions, and assignments, students develop analytical skills and acquire thematic knowledge complementary to the practical experiences of the internship. Specific topics vary by semester, depending on the class composition. Prereq: POSC 2201 or 2401 or 2061; or Jr. stndg.

POSC 4995. Independent Study in Political Science. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Jr. stndg., cons. of instr., and cons. of dept. ch.

POSC 4999. Senior Thesis. 3 cr. hrs.

Preparation of a thesis by approved students under the direction of an adviser. Prereq: Sr. stndg., POSC 4995, which may be taken concurrently, and cons. of dept. ch. Three semester hours of POSC 4995 are required.