Courses

ARSC 1020. Major Concepts in Modern Science 1. 4 cr. hrs.

An interdisciplinary, integrated study of processes and principles of physics and their application to astronomy and earth science. Topics will include: describing motion, energy and momentum, electricity and magnetism, waves, sound and light, reflection and refraction, heat, rocks and minerals, the earth (plate tectonics, land, and water cycles), weather, the solar system, and stellar life cycles. Scientific inquiry as a means of knowledge: major technological contributions to modern societies, stability, information transfer, and emphasizing relevant physical processes in specific environments. The course consists of 3 hrs. of lecture and 2 hrs. of laboratory work. May be counted as Natural Science toward the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum requirements, and for elementary/middle school and middle/secondary teaching certification. Does not count toward major requirements for biological sciences, chemistry, physics, and broad field science for early adolescence/adolescence teacher preparation.

ARSC 1021. Major Concepts in Modern Science 2. 4 cr. hrs.

An interdisciplinary, integrated study of processes and principles of chemistry and biology. Topics will include: describing matter, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, the cell, genetics, evolution and diversity, human biology, and ecosystems. Scientific inquiry as a means of knowledge: major technological contributions to modern societies, stability, information transfer, and evolution of biological systems, emphasizing relevant chemical processes in specific environments. The course consists of 3 hrs. of lecture and 2 hrs. of laboratory work. May be counted as Natural Science toward the Arts and Sciences College Curriculum requirements, and for elementary/middle school and middle/secondary teaching certification. Does not count toward major requirements for biological sciences, chemistry, physics, and broad field science for early adolescence/adolescence teacher preparation.

ARSC 1953. First-Year Seminar: Introduction to Inquiry. 1 cr. hr.

An academic seminar in which students work with a faculty mentor to enhance their critical thinking, reading, and communication skills through weekly small group exploration of ideas, evidence, and argumentation. Course topics vary. Students will also explore college transitional issues. Twelve weeks. S/U grade assessment. Limited to first-year students in the Klingler College of Arts and Sciences.

ARSC 1963. First Year Seminar: Lawyers in American Society. 1 cr. hr.

Academic seminar that introduces students in the Pre-law Scholars program to the legal profession, legal thought and legal education. Primary objective is to provide students with an opportunity to learn about lawyers, the practice of law and to assist them in making decisions about a career in law. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: First year Pre-law Scholar.

ARSC 2000. Democracy, Culture and Public Policy: Africa. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the manner, culture, values and identity that shape global and domestic politics in the West Africa region. Emphasis on public policy efforts to promote democracy and advance the overall welfare of the nation. Consists of two weeks of study and travel in West Africa. Travel fees.

ARSC 2931. Topics in Arts and Sciences. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Selected topics, not a part of the regular course work taught because of a special need, interest or opportunity.

ARSC 3370. Arts in a Democratic Society. 3 cr. hrs.

Seminar on the role of the arts in a democratic society. Topics include: government funding of the arts, cultural diversity and national arts policies, artists rights, community interests and public art. Readings of philosophers, culturally diverse writers and political-social scientists. Experiential learning involving site visits to museums, performing arts centers, and libraries in the Washington D.C. area is integrated with readings. Prereq: PHIL 1001 and cons. of prog. dir., Les Aspin Center for Government.

ARSC 3986. Internship. 1-4 cr. hrs.

Practical learning experiences. For example: An internship at the Center for the Study of Bioethics at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Interns are assigned projects in any of the several areas of the Bioethics Center. Areas may be in educational programs, research and investigation, medical ethics committees, publications and resources, and governmental relations. All internships require a commitment of 8-12 hours per week during the term. Selection is based on academic credentials, extra-curricular experience, and a written essay. May be taken only once. Grade is determined by evaluation of work performance and a final written assignment. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Jr. stndg., 3.000 GPA, and cons. of instr.

ARSC 3987. Career Ready Internship. 3 cr. hrs.

Professional development and career preparation experience in an organization (e.g. corporation, community social service agency, non-profit organization) for the purpose of furthering the student's integration of theory and practice in a professional setting. Placement into an approved internship position is for a minimum of 140 hours per semester under the supervision of organization personnel and includes a weekly seminar with the internship coordinator. Prereq: Jr. or Sr. stndg, minimum cum GPA of 2.0 and cons. of instr.

ARSC 4931. Topic in Arts and Sciences. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Offered according to availability of faculty, student interest and resources. Prereq: cons. of prog. dir.

ARSC 4953. Seminar In Urban Social Issues. 3 cr. hrs.

Les Aspin Center for Government, Washington, D.C. Prereq: cons. of prog. dir.

ARSC 9007. Undergraduate Concurrent Required Component: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

A less than half-time equivalent course, used for those Marquette undergraduate students who are participating in a program that requires a concurrent zero credit component of a course, such as a tutorial, a colloquium, D2L module, etc. SNC/UNC grading. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.