Interim Department Chair: Lars E. Olson, Ph.D.
Department of Biomedical Engineering website

The Department of Biomedical Engineering offers curriculum that leads to a bachelor of science degree in biomedical engineering. Within this one degree, there are three major options: Biocomputing, Bioelectronics and Biomechanics.

The boards of trustees of Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin have approved the creation of the Marquette and MCW Department of Biomedical Engineering which will bring together the engineering education and research expertise of Marquette and the medical research, technology and clinical expertise of MCW to provide an inclusive education model for the next generation of engineers, scientists and physicians. The new department officially launched on July 1, 2016. Click here for link to joint department website with more information.

Mission

The Department of Biomedical Engineering is a dedicated team committed to the Jesuit tradition of the pursuit of truth. We develop leaders and problem solvers skilled at applying engineering, science and design principles to improve health in the service of humanity by:

  • Discovering and disseminating new knowledge.
  • Guiding students to meaningful and ethical professional and personal lives.
  • Fostering interdisciplinary and collaborative research and education through academic and industrial alliances.
  • Continuing innovative leadership in education, research and industrial relationships.
  • Inspiring faculty and students to serve others.

Studies in biomedical engineering incorporate courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, computing and engineering. These courses, in combination, emphasize the interdisciplinary elements of biomedical engineering not presently offered in the more traditional departments of engineering. A solid foundation in the mathematical, physical and life sciences is necessary for the engineer to function effectively in a medically or biologically oriented problem solving environment. In this environment, the engineer needs to be able to communicate with physicians, to describe and model complex biological systems, to collect and analyze experimental or clinical data, to understand the capabilities and limitations of sophisticated instrumentation and to understand the principles of design.

There are three majors in the biomedical engineering curriculum: biocomputing, bioelectronics and biomechanics. The bioelectronics major includes rigorous training in electrical engineering within the interdisciplinary framework of the curriculum. Such training, which includes courses in electric circuits and analog and digital electronics, supports interests focused on the measurement of bioelectric signals and biomedical instrumentation design. In the senior year, the culmination of the training features intensive biomedical instrument design and computer laboratories emphasizing modern bioelectric applications. In addition, a senior year capstone design course sequence places the student in a multidisciplinary design team situation to solve an actual industrial bioelectronic design problem.

The biomechanics major includes rigorous training in mechanical engineering within the interdisciplinary framework of the curriculum. Such training, which includes courses in materials and solid mechanics, supports interests focused on the application of biomechanics and biomaterials. In the senior year, the culmination of the training features intensive biomedical instrument design and computer laboratories emphasizing modern biomechanical applications. In addition, a senior-year capstone design course sequence places the student in a multidisciplinary design team situation to solve an actual industrial biomechanical or biomaterial design problem.

The biocomputer engineering curriculum integrates computer engineering and the life sciences, with a solid foundation in mathematics, physics, chemistry and engineering methods. The new curriculum combines foundational computer engineering knowledge with biocomputer engineering applications, integrating biology, physiology, medicine, biomedical software design, biosignal processing and bioinstrumentation. In the senior year, the training culminates with a comprehensive, biocomputer engineering, design laboratory experience that incorporates engineers from industry and emphasizes medical device design and methods for biomedical informatics. In addition, a senior capstone design course places students in a multidisciplinary team working with industry to solve biocomputer design problems.

All majors in biomedical engineering have been designed to be compatible with other programs offered by the Opus College of Engineering. Each major fulfills the requirements of the University Core of Common Studies. The biomechanical and bioelectronics majors require 134 credits for graduation. The biocomputing major requires 135 credits for graduation. Students can earn an optional minor in either electrical or mechanical engineering as well as biology, chemistry, business administration or others. In addition, the majors retain many of the core courses of the initial two years and allow the student to elect the co-op/internship program. Since the majors satisfy the entrance requirements of many professional schools, the student can, usually without additional preparation, pursue studies in medical school, dental school, schools of veterinary medicine, law school and graduate schools in biomedical engineering or traditional areas of engineering.

The Department of Biomedical Engineering operates biomedical image and signal processing laboratories, biocomputer, bioelectronic and biomechanical design laboratories, and students have access to computer, electrical and mechanical engineering laboratories as well as the college and university computer facilities. In addition, collaborative programs exist between Marquette University, the Medical College of Wisconsin, the Milwaukee County Medical Complex, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, and the Zablocki Veterans Administration Medical Center. These proximate collaborative research programs, some active for three decades, provide a uniquely enhanced laboratory experience that has significantly contributed to the success of biomedical engineering at Marquette.

Educational Objectives

To provide an educational program that will prepare graduates to:

  • Participate as a technical contributor and member of a design and/or development team.
  • Communicate effectively with individuals and teams with a wide variety of backgrounds.
  • Pursue professional or graduate degrees or employment in the biomedical industry.
  • Understand the legal, ethical, economic and regulatory requirements of medical device design and biomedical engineering research.
  • Define, solve and implement solutions to a problem.
  • Progress in developing leadership skills.
  • Identify limitations in their own knowledge base and skills and engage in lifelong learning.

Non-Biomedical Engineering Minors

Biomedical engineering students can earn minors in a wide variety of areas including computer engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, biology and chemistry. Interested students should consult with their academic adviser and refer to the appropriate section of the Undergraduate Bulletin for specific minor requirements. Students wishing to achieve a minor in a non-engineering minor should follow the guidelines listed in the "Concentrations and Minors" section of the Opus College of Engineering bulletin.

Five Year B.S./M.S. Program

This program allows students to receive a bachelor of science degree and a master of science degree in biomedical engineering in five years. Students with grade point averages (3.500 or above) apply to the program during their junior year. They begin their thesis research the summer between their junior and senior years. Their research laboratory experience continues the summer between their senior and fifth years and throughout their fifth year, culminating in the preparation of a written thesis and defense.

Biocomputing Major

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIEN 11002BIEN 11102
BIOL 1001b3BIOL 1002b3
MATH 14502,b4MATH 1455b4
PHYS 1003b4PHYS 1004b4
Core Rhetoric 1f3Core Rhetoric 2f3
 16 16
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MATH 24553EECE 16103
GEEN 29521BIEN 23004
CHEM 1001b4CHEM 1002b4
BIEN 11202EECE 20303
BIEN 21001Core electivec3
BIOL 20013 
Core electivec3 
 17 17
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EECE 27103COEN 26103
BIEN 33003COEN 47103
BIEN 47003COEN 48203
COSC 20103BIEN 42203
THEO 1001b3BIEN 32003
Core electivec3 
 18 15
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIEN 49203BIEN 49983
BIEN 33103BIEN 43203
BIEN 42803BIEN 42903
PHIL 1001b3BIEN elective13
BIEN elective13PHIL 2310b3
THEO electivee3 
 18 15
Total credit hours: 132

For footnotes b, c, d, e, f refer to the Opus College of Engineering section of this bulletin for details related to these footnotes.

 1. Biomedical Engineering Electives — The following is a list of electives typically taken by biomedical engineering students. This list is not inclusive. A total of 6 credit hours of BIEN Electives are required. Other possible electives include upper division courses in MATH, BIOL, PHYS, CHEM, EECE, MEEN, COEN and related subject areas. These courses can be taken if approved by the adviser, department chair and associate dean through a course substitution form. Medical school bound students are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 2111 Organic Chemistry 1, CHEM 2112 Organic Chemistry 2 and BIOL 4101 Biochemistry and the Molecular Basis of Biology as electives.

BIEN 4230Intelligent Biosystems3
BIEN 4400Transport Phenomena3
BIEN 4410Applied Finite Element Analysis3
BIEN 4420Biomaterials Science and Engineering3
BIEN 4500Medical Imaging Physics3
BIEN 4510Image Processing for the Biomedical Sciences3
BIEN 4600Neural Engineering3
BIEN 4610Introduction to Rehabilitation Robotics3
BIEN 4620Rehabilitation Science and Engineering3
BIEN 4630Rehabilitation Engineering: Prosthetics, Orthotics, Seating and Positioning3
BIEN 4640Bioengineering of Living Actuators3
BIEN 4710Analysis of Physiological Models3
BIEN 4720Cardiopulmonary Mechanics3
BIEN 4931Topics in Biomedical Engineering1-3
BIEN 4995Independent Study in Biomedical Engineering (GPA>3.0)1-4
ELEN 3110Electromagnetic Fields 13
ELEN 3120Electromagnetic Fields 23
ELEN 3025Electrical Instrumentation Laboratory2
ELEN 3035Analog Electronics Laboratory2
EECE 2710Introduction to Computer Hardware and Software3
COEN 4650Introduction to Algorithms3
COEN 4620Modern Programming Practices3
COEN 4810Database Applications3
CEEN 2130Mechanics of Materials3
MEEN 3310Thermodynamics 13
MEEN 3330Fundamentals of Heat Transfer3
MEEN 3250Design of Machine Elements 14
MEEN 4240Polymers and Polymer Composites3
MEEN 4420Failure Analysis3
BIOL 4101Biochemistry and the Molecular Basis of Biology3
BIOL 3702Experimental Physiology3
CHEM 2111Organic Chemistry 14
CHEM 2112Organic Chemistry 24
MATH 2450Calculus 34
MATH 4630Mathematical Modeling and Analysis3

2. Students who place out of MATH 1450 Calculus 1 through advanced placement are encouraged to take MATH 1451 Calculus 2 and MATH 2450 Calculus 3 in place of MATH 1450 Calculus 1 and MATH 1455 Calculus 2 for Biomedical and Civil Engineers.

Note: The three Core electives specified in this program assume that one of these Core electives is a Dual Application core course. If a Dual Application Core elective is not taken, an additional Core elective is required and the total credit hours increases to 135.

Bioelectronics Major

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIEN 11002BIEN 11102
BIOL 1001b3BIOL 1002b3
MATH 14502,b4MATH 1455b4
PHYS 1003b4PHYS 1004b4
Core Rhetoric 1f3Core Rhetoric 2f3
 16 16
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EECE 20103ELEN 20203
EECE 20151EECE 20351
BIEN 11202EECE 20303
MATH 24553ELEN 20403
GEEN 29521BIEN 21001
CHEM 1001b4CHEM 1002b4
Core electivec3Core electivec3
 17 18
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EECE 30103ELEN 30303
BIOL 20013BIEN 33103
BIEN 33003BIEN 32003
BIEN 47003BIEN elective13
BIEN elective13PHIL 1001b3
THEO 1001b3 
 18 15
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIEN 49203BIEN 49983
BIEN 43203BIEN 4400 or BIEN elective13
BIEN 43803BIEN 43903
BIEN elective or BIEN 440013PHIL 2310b3
EECE 30152Core electivec3
THEO electivee3 
 17 15
Total credit hours: 132

For footnotes b, c, d, e, f refer to the Opus College of Engineering section of this bulletin for details related to these footnotes.

 1. Biomedical Engineering Electives — The following is a list of electives typically taken by biomedical engineering students. This list is not inclusive. A total of 9 credit hours of BIEN Electives are required. Other possible electives include upper division courses in MATH, BIOL, PHYS, CHEM, EECE, MEEN, COEN and related subject areas. These courses can be taken if approved by the adviser, department chair and associate dean through a course substitution form. Medical school bound students are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 2111 Organic Chemistry 1CHEM 2112 Organic Chemistry 2 and BIOL 4101 Biochemistry and the Molecular Basis of Biology as electives.

BIEN 4220Embedded Biomedical Instrumentation3
BIEN 4230Intelligent Biosystems3
BIEN 4410Applied Finite Element Analysis3
BIEN 4420Biomaterials Science and Engineering3
BIEN 4500Medical Imaging Physics3
BIEN 4510Image Processing for the Biomedical Sciences3
BIEN 4600Neural Engineering3
BIEN 4610Introduction to Rehabilitation Robotics3
BIEN 4620Rehabilitation Science and Engineering3
BIEN 4630Rehabilitation Engineering: Prosthetics, Orthotics, Seating and Positioning3
BIEN 4640Bioengineering of Living Actuators3
BIEN 4710Analysis of Physiological Models3
BIEN 4720Cardiopulmonary Mechanics3
BIEN 4931Topics in Biomedical Engineering1-3
BIEN 4995Independent Study in Biomedical Engineering (GPA>3.0)1-4
COEN 4620Modern Programming Practices3
COEN 4650Introduction to Algorithms3
COEN 4810Database Applications3
ELEN 3110Electromagnetic Fields 13
ELEN 3120Electromagnetic Fields 23
ELEN 3025Electrical Instrumentation Laboratory2
ELEN 3035Analog Electronics Laboratory2
EECE 2710Introduction to Computer Hardware and Software3
CEEN 2130Mechanics of Materials3
MEEN 3310Thermodynamics 13
MEEN 3330Fundamentals of Heat Transfer3
MEEN 3250Design of Machine Elements 14
MEEN 4240Polymers and Polymer Composites3
MEEN 4420Failure Analysis3
BIOL 3702Experimental Physiology3
BIOL 4101Biochemistry and the Molecular Basis of Biology3
CHEM 2111Organic Chemistry 14
CHEM 2112Organic Chemistry 24
MATH 2450Calculus 34
MATH 4630Mathematical Modeling and Analysis3

2. Students who place out of MATH 1450 Calculus 1 through advanced placement are encouraged to take MATH 1451 Calculus 2 and MATH 2450 Calculus 3 in place of MATH 1450 Calculus 1 and MATH 1455 Calculus 2 for Biomedical and Civil Engineers. MATH 2450 Calculus 3 will count as a BIEN elective.

Note: The three Core electives specified in this program assume that one of these Core electives is a Dual Application core course. If a Dual Application Core elective is not taken, an additional Core elective is required and the total credit hours increases to 135.

Biomechanics Major

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIEN 11002BIEN 11102
BIOL 1001b3BIOL 1002b3
MATH 14502,b4MATH 1455b4
PHYS 1003b4PHYS 1004b4
Core Rhetoric 1f3Core Rhetoric 2f3
 16 16
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIOL 20013MEEN 24603
CHEM 1001b4CHEM 1002b4
CEEN 21103MEEN 21203
MATH 24553BIEN 21001
GEEN 29521BIEN 23004
BIEN 11202Core electivec3
 16 18
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIEN 33003BIEN 33103
MEEN 3310 or BIEN 32003BIEN 3200 or MEEN 33103
MEEN elective33BIEN 47003
THEO 1001b3BIEN elective13
Core electivec3CEEN 21303
 Core electivec3
 15 18
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BIEN 49203BIEN 49983
BIEN 43203BIEN 4400 or BIEN elective13
BIEN 44803BIEN 44903
BIEN elective or BIEN 440013BIEN elective13
THEO electivee3PHIL 2310b3
PHIL 1001b3 
 18 15
Total credit hours: 132

For footnotes b, c, d, e, f refer to the Opus College of Engineering section of this bulletin for details related to these footnotes.

 1. Biomedical Engineering Electives — The following is a list of electives typically taken by biomedical engineering students. This list is not inclusive. A total of 9 credit hours of BIEN Electives are required. Other possible electives include upper division courses in MATH, BIOL, PHYS, CHEM, EECE, MEEN, COEN and related subject areas. These courses can be taken if approved by the adviser, department chair and associate dean through a course substitution form. Medical school bound students are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 2111 Organic Chemistry 1CHEM 2112 Organic Chemistry 2 and BIOL 4101 Biochemistry and the Molecular Basis of Biology as electives.

BIEN 4220Embedded Biomedical Instrumentation3
BIEN 4230Intelligent Biosystems3
BIEN 4410Applied Finite Element Analysis3
BIEN 4420Biomaterials Science and Engineering3
BIEN 4500Medical Imaging Physics3
BIEN 4510Image Processing for the Biomedical Sciences3
BIEN 4600Neural Engineering3
BIEN 4610Introduction to Rehabilitation Robotics3
BIEN 4620Rehabilitation Science and Engineering3
BIEN 4630Rehabilitation Engineering: Prosthetics, Orthotics, Seating and Positioning3
BIEN 4640Bioengineering of Living Actuators3
BIEN 4710Analysis of Physiological Models3
BIEN 4720Cardiopulmonary Mechanics3
BIEN 4931Topics in Biomedical Engineering1-3
BIEN 4995Independent Study in Biomedical Engineering (GPA>3.0)1-4
MEEN 3330Fundamentals of Heat Transfer3
MEEN 3250Design of Machine Elements 14
MEEN 4240Polymers and Polymer Composites3
MEEN 4420Failure Analysis3
COEN 4620Modern Programming Practices3
COEN 4650Introduction to Algorithms3
COEN 4810Database Applications3
ELEN 3110Electromagnetic Fields 13
ELEN 3120Electromagnetic Fields 23
ELEN 3025Electrical Instrumentation Laboratory2
ELEN 3035Analog Electronics Laboratory2
EECE 2710Introduction to Computer Hardware and Software3
BIOL 3702Experimental Physiology3
BIOL 4101Biochemistry and the Molecular Basis of Biology3
CHEM 2111Organic Chemistry 14
CHEM 2112Organic Chemistry 24
MATH 2450Calculus 34
MATH 4630Mathematical Modeling and Analysis3

2. Students who place out of MATH 1450 Calculus 1 through advanced placement are encouraged to take MATH 1451 Calculus 2 and MATH 2450 Calculus 3 in place of MATH 1450 Calculus 1 and MATH 1455 Calculus 2 for Biomedical and Civil Engineers.

3. Mechanical Engineering Electives - Students may choose from the following list of courses. If not used as an Mechanical Engineering elective, any of these courses may be used as a Biomedical Engineering Elective.

MEEN 3220Dynamics of Mechanical Systems3
MEEN 3250Design of Machine Elements 14
MEEN 3260Numerical Methods of Mechanical Systems3
MEEN 3460Materials Selection in Mechanical Design3
MEEN 4220Intermediate Dynamics3
MEEN 4230Intermediate Mechanics of Materials3
MEEN 4240Polymers and Polymer Composites3
MEEN 4330Optics, Lasers and Spectroscopy in Engineering3

Note: The three Core electives specified in this program assume that one of these Core electives is a Dual Application core course. If a Dual Application Core elective is not taken, an additional Core elective is required and the total credit hours increases to 135.

Biomedical Engineering Minor

The Department of Biomedical Engineering offers a minor in biomedical engineering to all undergraduate students in the university except those students in biomedical engineering. Completion of the minor will be noted on the student’s transcript if the following requirements are met: Twenty-two hours consisting of:

BIEN 2300Biomedical Circuits and Electronics4
BIEN 3200Computer Applications in Biomedical Engineering3
BIEN 3300Signals and Systems for Biomedical Engineering3
BIEN 4320Biomedical Instrumentation Design3
BIEN 4400Transport Phenomena3
BIEN 4700Systems Physiology3
BIOL 1001General Biology 13
or equivalent
Total Credit Hours22

At least half of these credit hours must be taken at Marquette University.

Courses

BIEN 1100. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering Methods 1. 2 cr. hrs.

Introduction to biomedical engineering design and problem solving using. Key elements include: physiologic signals and data acquisition, instrumentation, graphics, measurement and error, teamwork and decision-making. Problem-solving elements are applied to real-world biomedical problems introduced by practicing biomedical engineers, as well as, faculty. Prereq: Enrolled in the College of Engineering.

BIEN 1110. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering Methods 2. 2 cr. hrs.

Continuation of BIEN 1100. Key elements include: modeling, fluid mechanics, rehabilitation engineering and entrepreneurship. Problem-solving and design elements are applied to real-world biomedical problems introduced by practicing biomedical engineers, as well as, faculty. Prereq: BIEN 1100 and enrolled in the College of Engineering.

BIEN 1120. Introduction to Computing for Biomedical Engineers. 2 cr. hrs.

Introductory hands-on experience in computer programming, MATLAB, and Solid Modeling and CAD for biomedical engineers. Involves learning linear programming in C and creating flow-charts to solve biomedical applications. Computing topics will include syntax, data types, control flow and algorithm development. Biomedical applications include analyzing physiological signals, biological event detection, and biomechanical analysis. Students learn how to use MATLAB to solve biomedical applications. Solid modeling and CAD will be studied in the context of biomedical engineering design. Laptop required.

BIEN 2100. Statistics for Biomedical Engineering. 1 cr. hr.

Numerical and graphical summary of biomedical data and the use of statistics in problem solving for a variety of case studies in biomedical research, medical device design and clinical trials. Prereq: MATH 1450.

BIEN 2300. Biomedical Circuits and Electronics. 4 cr. hrs.

An experience in electrical circuits (AC and DC), electronic devices (Junction, Transistor, Operational, Amplifier) bridges, digital circuits and Boolean implementation, combinational and sequential logic, memories. Use of P-Spice software. Analysis and design. Prereq: PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1014.

BIEN 2400. Medical Device Design Constraints. 1 cr. hr.

Students learn about legal, ethical, regulatory, economic, environmental, cultural, and social constraints that affect the design of medical devices. Students identify relevant, applicable design constraints and understand the impact of these constraints on the design process and the project schedule. Prereq: Soph. stndg. BIEN major, or cons. of instr.

BIEN 3200. Computer Applications in Biomedical Engineering. 3 cr. hrs.

Design and implement computer techniques for the acquisition and analysis of biomedical data and the modeling of physiologic phenomena. Emphasis on physiological data acquisition, statistical description of physiological data, time domain and frequency domain methods for physiological signal conditioning and processing and numerical methods for quantitative interpretation of physiological data using C programming language. Prereq: BIEN 1120 or equiv.

BIEN 3300. Signals and Systems for Biomedical Engineering. 3 cr. hrs.

Mathematical models of continuous-time signals and systems are studied. The time domain viewpoint is developed for linear time invariant systems using the impulse response and convolution integral. The frequency domain viewpoint is also explored through the Fourier Series and Fourier Transform. Basic filtering concepts including simple design problems are covered. Application of the Laplace transform to block diagrams, linear feedback and stability including Bode plots are discussed. The sampling theorem, the z-transform and the Discrete Fourier Transform are introduced. Examples of electrical, mechanical and biomedical signals and systems are used extensively throughout the course. 3 hrs. lec. Prereq: One of the following: ELEN 2020 with minimum grade of C and MATH 2451; or BIEN 2300 with minimum grade of C and MATH 2451; or ELEN 2020 with minimum grade of C and MATH 2455; or BIEN 2300 with minimum grade of C and MATH 2455. BIEN 1120 or concurrent enrollment.

BIEN 3310. Control Systems for Biomedical Engineering. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides an introduction to the principles of control systems theory for biomedical engineers. Mathematical techniques to characterize and design control systems will be studied in the context of physiological, bioelectrical, biochemical and biomechanical systems. Topics include frequency and time-domain modeling of physiological control systems, feedback, stability, steady-state error, design, root-locus, state-space techniques, and nonlinear control. Simulation using MATLAB and Simulink will be used to provide hands-on experience in the design of biomedical control systems. Prereq: BIEN 3300.

BIEN 3400. Clinical Issues in Biomedical Engineering Design. 1 cr. hr.

Develops clinical literacy in areas including medical terminology, working with medical professionals, professional conduct in the clinical environment, operating room workflow, and the technical needs of surgeons, nurses, dentists, and others. Students observe procedures in the clinical environment and learn to listen, ask questions, and identify problems, unmet needs and opportunities for new product development. Students participate in field trips to obtain hands-on experience with various medical and dental devices. A project proposal for a new medical device or technology is required at the end of the course. Prereq: BIEN major and jr. stndg; or cons. of instr.

BIEN 4220. Embedded Biomedical Instrumentation. 3 cr. hrs.

Fundamentals of digital circuit design and analysis and the application to embedded biomedical instrumentation. Topics include microprocessor principles and programming and system design constraints for medical electronics. Laboratory will provide applications of concepts introduced in class. Prereq: BIEN 2300.

BIEN 4230. Intelligent Biosystems. 3 cr. hrs.

Use of emerging tools in systems biology and soft computing to explore how biosystems with highly distributed "intelligence" are designed to adapt to self- and environmentally-induced perturbations. Students obtain a basic understanding of key soft computing tools and use fuzzy expert system models. Applications to smart healthcare monitoring and future product design will be explored. Prereq: Jr. stndg. and BIEN 4700.

BIEN 4280. Biocomputers Design Lab 1. 3 cr. hrs.

Hands-on experience in software design and validation, microprocessors, computer architecture, real-time computing, embedded software, graphical user interface and networking. An emphasis on medical devices with embedded software and hardware. Prereq: BIEN 2300, BIEN 4220, BIEN 3300, and BIEN 3200.

BIEN 4290. Biocomputers Design Lab 2. 3 cr. hrs.

Continuation of BIEN 4280 with emphasis on high performance computing in workstation environments. Prereq: BIEN 4280.

BIEN 4320. Biomedical Instrumentation Design. 3 cr. hrs.

Problems in instrumentation relating to physiological measurements in the laboratory and clinic. Electronic devices for stimulus as well as measurement of physiological quantities. Design of actual instruments. Features include mechanical design, accessory design and safety requirements. Prereq: BIEN 2300 and BIEN 3300; or ELEN 3030 and BIEN 3300.

BIEN 4380. Bioelectronics Design Lab 1. 3 cr. hrs.

Understanding the principles of operation, safe operating procedures and methods of medical instrument selection. Design of experiments to measure physiological parameters. Typical experiments include: electrical safety; myography; force measurement; operational amplifier characterization; active filter; respiration monitoring. Actual medical instruments used under approximate clinical conditions. Report writing. 2 hrs. lec., 3 hrs. lab. Prereq: EECE 2015, EECE 2035, ELEN 3030.

BIEN 4390. Bioelectronics Design Lab 2. 3 cr. hrs.

Design of circuits used in research and clinical instrumentation. Experiments include the design, fabrication and evaluation of specific circuits. Typical projects include circuits used for: patient isolation from electrical hazard, measurement of heart rate, multiplexing and demultiplexing and analog to digital conversion. Design projects incorporating microprocessors are also included. Students required to submit reports. 2 hrs. lec., 3 hrs. lab. Prereq: BIEN 4380 and EECE 3015.

BIEN 4400. Transport Phenomena. 3 cr. hrs.

Applications of mass, momentum, and mechanical energy balances to biomedical fluid systems. Study of physiological phenomena with an emphasis on cardiovascular systems and blood rheology. Prereq: Jr. stndg. and PHYS 1003, or cons. of instr.

BIEN 4410. Applied Finite Element Analysis. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces the finite element solution method for linear, static problems. Includes calculation of element stiffness matrices, assembly of global stiffness matrices, exposure to various finite element solution methods, and numerical integration. Emphasizes structural mechanics, and also discusses heat transfer and fluid mechanics applications in finite element analysis. Computer assignments include development of finite element code (FORTRAN or C) and also use of commercial finite element software (ANSYS and/or MARC). Prereq: Sr. stndg., BIEN 1110 and CEEN 2130; or Sr. stndg., CEEN 2130, and GEEN 1220.

BIEN 4420. Biomaterials Science and Engineering. 3 cr. hrs.

Designed to introduce the uses of materials in the human body for the purposes of healing, correcting deformities and restoring lost function. The science aspect of the course encompasses topics including: characterization of material properties, biocompatibility and past and current uses of materials for novel devices that are both biocompatible and functional for the life of the implanted device. Projects allow students to focus and gain knowledge in an area of biomaterials engineering in which they are interested. Prereq: MEEN 2460 or cons. of instr.

BIEN 4480. Biomechanics Design Lab 1. 3 cr. hrs.

Intended for those students pursuing the Biomedical Engineering Biomechanics option. The application of principles of engineering mechanics, data acquisition and basic electronics in the design and utilization of biomechanical instrumentation. Principles of transduction, mechanics, sampling theory, strain, temperature, and flow measurement as applied to biomechanical systems. A background in data acquisition, electrical safety, operational amplifier and bridge circuits, and measurements is provided. Experiments investigate biomechanics of the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems and include design content. Report writing. 2 hrs. lec., 3 hrs. lab. Prereq: BIEN 2300, MEEN 2120, and CEEN 2130.

BIEN 4490. Biomechanics Design Lab 2. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides students with experience in the design and implementation of appropriate experimental procedures to analyze biomechanical problems. Students will become familiar with various types of advanced transducers which will be used in conjunction with data acquisition workstations to obtain thermal, flow, strain, and related physiological data from biomechanical systems. Topics include mechanical properties of active muscle; analysis of human motion; postural stability; thermal regulation; cardiovascular mechanics; stress distribution in skeletal system; and comparison of static and dynamic biomechanical responses to load. 2 hrs. lec., 3 hrs. lab. Prereq: BIEN 4480.

BIEN 4500. Medical Imaging Physics. 3 cr. hrs.

Students learn how light, X-rays, radiopharmaceuticals, ultrasound, magnetic fields, and other energy probes are generated and how they interact with tissues and detectors to produce useful image contrast. Practical issues such as beam generation, dose limitations, patient motion, spatial resolution and dynamic range limitations, and cost-effectiveness will be addressed. Emphasis is placed upon diagnostic radiological imaging physics, including the planar X-ray, digital subtraction angiography mammography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging modalities. Prereq: PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1014.

BIEN 4510. Image Processing for the Biomedical Sciences. 3 cr. hrs.

This course serves as an introduction to biomedical image processing. Topics explored included the human visual system, spatial sampling and digitization, image transforms, spatial filtering, Fourier analysis, image enhancement and restoration, nonlinear and adaptive filters, color image processing, geometrical operations and morphological filtering, image coding and compression image segmentation, feature extraction and object classification. Applications in diagnostic medicine, biology and biomedical research are emphasized and presented as illustrative examples. Prereq: MATH 1450 and MATH 1451 or MATH 1455; knowledge of C programming; or cons. of instr.

BIEN 4600. Neural Engineering. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic principles of neural engineering, properties of excitable tissues, quantitative models used to examine the mechanisms of natural and artificial stimulation. Basic concepts for the design of neuroprosthetic devices for sensory, motor and therapeutic applications. Design issues including electrode type, biomaterials, tissue response to stimulating electrodes and stimulus parameters for electrical stimulation and artificial control. Examples of how engineering interfaces with neural tissue show increasing promise in the rehabilitation of individuals of neural impairment. Prereq: PHYS 1004 or PHYS 1014.

BIEN 4610. Introduction to Rehabilitation Robotics. 3 cr. hrs.

Presents the fundamentals of robotics as it is applied to rehabilitation engineering. Specific topics include: the fundamentals of analysis and design of robot manipulators with examples and mini-projects taken from rehabilitation applications pertaining to robotic therapy devices and personal assistants. Additional topics include: overview of rehabilitation robotics field, human-centered design of rehabilitation robots issues and challenges, robot configurations, rigid motions and homogeneous transformations, Denavit-Hartenberg representation, robot kinematics, and inverse kinematics, Euler-Lagrange equations, trajectory generation, sensors, actuators, independent joint control, force control and safety. Prereq: Jr. stndg.

BIEN 4620. Rehabilitation Science and Engineering. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces rehabilitation science as the study of tissue and functional change, including:overview of key human sensory modalities and neuromotor systems in the context of functional capabilities and human performance metrics; review of spontaneous recovery mechanisms in response to various types of tissue trauma; review of roles of genetics and gene transcription networks in pathology and functional recovery prognosis; and the concept of rehabilitative assessment and therapeutic interventions as an optimization problem. Also focuses on the use of assistive technology to enhance access to independent living and to optimize the delivery of rehabilitative healthcare services. Includes rehabilitation biomechanics of physical interfaces, use of access and usability engineering in product design and innovative assessment and intervention strategies for neurorehabilitation. Prereq: BIEN 2300 or equiv.

BIEN 4630. Rehabilitation Engineering: Prosthetics, Orthotics, Seating and Positioning. 3 cr. hrs.

Presents an overview of biomedical engineering as it applies to Rehabilitation Engineering, specifically, the design and prescription of prosthetic limbs, orthotic devices, and seating and positioning systems. Topics include: medical terminology, musculoskeletal anatomy, muscle mechanics, soft tissue mechanics, gait/locomotion, amputation surgery, lower extremity prosthetics, lower extremity orthotics, hand function, electromyography, upper extremity prosthetics, upper extremity orthotics, seating and positioning, and assistive devices. Prereq: MEEN 2120 or CEEN 2122.

BIEN 4640. Bioengineering of Living Actuators. 3 cr. hrs.

Overview of muscle tissue as a living actuator from the perspective of engineering design, systems biology, muscle modeling and adaptive control. Prereq: BIEN 4700, BIEN 3300.

BIEN 4700. Systems Physiology. 3 cr. hrs.

Analyses of the underlying physiologic and bioengineering aspects of the major cell and organ systems of the human from an engineer's point of view. Classic physiologic approaches used to introduce topics including cell functions, nervous system, nerve, muscle, heart, circulation, respiratory system, kidney, reproduction and biomechanics. Design problems including models of cell-organ-system function and problems in biomechanics illuminate topics covered. Computer techniques and relevant instrumentation are incorporated. Experts on related topics are invited to speak as they are available. Prereq: BIOL 1001 and BIOL 1002 and Jr. stndg.

BIEN 4710. Analysis of Physiological Models. 3 cr. hrs.

Development of continuous (compartmental), and distributed-in-space-and-time mathematical models of physiological systems and molecular events. Analytical and numerical methods for solving differential equations of the initial and boundary value types. Simulation of model response, and estimation of model parameters using linear and nonlinear regression analysis. Prereq: Jr. stndg. and MATH 2451; or jr. stndg. and MATH 2455.

BIEN 4720. Cardiopulmonary Mechanics. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination of the physiological behavior of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems from an engineering perspective. Emphasis is on understanding the mechanical basis of physiologic phenomena via experimental models. Prereq: BIEN 4700, which must be taken concurrently, or equiv.; and BIEN 4400, which must be taken concurrently, or equiv.; or cons. of instr.

BIEN 4920. Principles of Design. 3 cr. hrs.

Course content focuses on a structured product design and development process that includes project definition, customer needs identification, product specification, concept generation, and concept selection. Course also focuses on issues related to teamwork, project management, and effective communication. Student team design projects culminate in the development of a technically and economically viable concept and a proposal for future development of this concept (done in the second semester of this two-course sequence). 2 hr. lec., 1 hr. disc. Prereq: Sr. stndg.; co-op students, jr. stndg. Cross-listed with COEN 4920, ELEN 4920 and MEEN 4920.

BIEN 4931. Topics in Biomedical Engineering. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Course content announced prior to each term. Students may enroll in the course more than once because subject matter changes. Possible topics include biomechanics, experimental methods, neuroanatomy, telemetry, etc. Prereq: Jr. stndg.

BIEN 4995. Independent Study in Biomedical Engineering. 1-4 cr. hrs.

Undergraduate independent study project of either a theoretical or experimental nature. Prereq: Jr. stndg., 3.000 GPA, cons. of instr., and cons. of dept. ch.; or sr. stndg., 3.000 GPA, cons. of instr., and cons. of dept. ch.

BIEN 4998. Senior Design Project. 3 cr. hrs.

Course focuses on detailed design, prototyping, and testing design concepts. Course includes topics directly relevant to student design projects and careers in the engineering profession. Student team design projects culminate in a final report that documents the performance and details (engineering drawings and/or documentation) of their final design. 2 hrs. lec., 1 hr. disc. Prereq: BIEN 4920. Cross-listed with COEN 4998, ELEN 4998 and MEEN 4998.

BIEN 4999. Senior Thesis within the Department of Biomedical Engineering. 3 cr. hrs.

Preparation of a thesis by approved students to gain experience in the type of critical research and analysis that an advanced degree requires. The associated extended project is designed to enhance research and communication skills leading to a high quality manuscript that could be submitted for peer-reviewed journal publication. Prereq: MU GPA greater than or equal to 3.5, BIEN 4995, cons. of dept. ch.