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Academic Integrity

Statement on Academic Integrity

We, the scholars of Marquette University, recognize the importance of personal integrity in all aspects of life and work. We commit ourselves to truthfulness, honor, and responsibility by which we earn the respect of others. We support the development of good character in our academic community, and commit to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity as an important aspect of personal integrity. Our commitment obliges us as students, faculty, and staff to conduct ourselves according to the Marquette University Honor Code set forth below. We do this in pursuit of Marquette University’s mission, which is the search for truth, the discovery and sharing of knowledge, the fostering of personal and professional excellence, the promotion of a life of faith, and the development of leadership expressed in service to others.

Students are asked to commit to academic integrity through the following honor pledge. Faculty may require students to sign the pledge in their courses or for any individual assignment.

I recognize the importance of personal integrity in all aspects of life and work. I commit myself to truthfulness, honor, and responsibility, by which I earn the respect of others. I support the development of good character, and commit myself to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity as an important aspect of personal integrity. My commitment obliges me to conduct myself according to the Marquette University Honor Code.

Marquette University Honor Code

The honor code obliges students:

  1. To fully observe the rules governing exams and assignments regarding resource material, electronic aids, copying, collaborating with others, or engaging in any other behavior that subverts the purpose of the exam or assignment and the directions of the instructor.
  2. To turn in work done specifically for the paper or assignment, and not to borrow work either from other students, or from assignments for other courses.
  3. To give full and proper credit to sources and references, and to acknowledge the contributions and ideas of others relevant to academic work.
  4. To report circumstances that may compromise academic honesty, such as inattentive proctoring or premature posting of answers.
  5. To complete individual assignments individually, and neither to accept nor give unauthorized help.
  6. To accurately represent their academic achievements, which may include their grade point average, degree, honors, etc., in transcripts, in interviews, in professional organizations, on resumes and in the workplace.
  7. To report any observed breaches of this honor code and academic honesty.

Academic integrity is a matter of great importance to the entire Marquette community and as such the honor code obliges others on campus as well.

The honor code obliges instructors:

  1. To monitor and design exams and assignments so that honest students will not be disadvantaged by other students who might choose to cheat if given the opportunity.
  2. To report circumstances that may compromise academic honesty, such as inattentive proctoring or premature posting of answers.
  3. To follow all published procedures regarding cases of academic misconduct.
  4. To report any observed breaches of this honor code and academic honesty.

The honor code obliges researchers:

  1. To give full and proper credit to sources and references, and to acknowledge the contributions and ideas of others relevant to research.
  2. To conduct research experiments according to professional standards of objectivity conscientiousness, reliability and transparency.
  3. To conduct all experiments according to professional ethical standards, and, when applicable, to submit all proposed investigations to the relevant oversight bodies.
  4. To provide sufficient documentation of research methodology so that other researchers in the field may replicate work.
  5. To observe all duties required by copyright and patent regulations.
  6. To follow all published procedures regarding cases of personal and academic misconduct.
  7. To report any observed breaches of this honor code and academic honesty.

The honor code obliges staff:

  1. To interpret procedures and regulations in the spirit of furthering the highest standards of personal and academic integrity.
  2. To report circumstances that may compromise academic honesty, such as inattentive proctoring or premature posting of answers.
  3. To follow through on reporting, punishment, and record-keeping on all incidents of personal and academic misconduct.
  4. To follow all published procedures regarding cases of personal and academic misconduct.
  5. To report any observed breaches of this honor code and academic honesty.

Academic Integrity Best Practices

In addition to the honor code, members of the Marquette University community commit to the following set of best practices.

As students we strive to come to class on time and to be prepared for the material at hand. This includes all readings and assignments. We strive to devote our full attention to the class proceedings and to be fully engaged in class discussions and activities. We recognize the importance of asking questions about material we don’t understand, as it helps other students who may not have thought of the question but need to hear the answer, and it gives the instructor valuable feedback. We respect the views of classmates and instructors, and we avoid distracting the class and instructor with irrelevant conversations or behavior. We strive to prepare for exams in a timely manner, and to seek help from the instructor when necessary during the preparation. We start preparing papers, projects, and homework assignments early enough to have sufficient time to do the best we can.

As instructors we strive to be prepared and current with respect to the content and conduct of our courses, and to plan the course and class sessions to achieve the course objectives effectively. We strive to answer questions honestly and completely, and to acknowledge when we do not have an answer. We strive to give all students equal opportunity to participate in class discussions and activities. We respect students’ views on issues of judgment, and we clearly distinguish between our personal opinions and our professional expertise. We are available during office hours or at arranged times to work with students individually to help them to master course material. We strive to develop and update exams and assignments so that they are meaningful tests of understanding and progress toward achieving course objectives. Finally, we give due and careful consideration to students’ answers and submissions when evaluating them and assigning grades.

As researchers we strive to be honest, accurate, efficient, objective, and accountable in conducting and reporting our research efforts. Where applicable, we aim to publish in outlets accessible to other professionals in the field for the greatest possible dissemination of creative scholarly research.

As staff we strive to serve all faculty and students within the confines of Marquette University policy and procedure. We recognize the importance of serving all faculty and students fairly and on a timely basis, while maintaining confidentiality. We respect teaching and learning, and support faculty and students in this endeavor every day.

The Marquette Academic Integrity philosophy expressed above is incorporated within the Academic Honest Policy outlined below.

Academic Honesty Policy

Preamble

Marquette University is committed to developing the whole person, spiritually, mentally, physically, socially, and ethically. As an institution of higher education, love of truth is at the center of the university’s enterprise, and academic honesty, in all its forms, is an explicit value of the university. The development and practice of academic honesty and integrity, both inside and outside the classroom, are expectations for all members of the university community. In order to cultivate academic honesty in its students, instructors take every opportunity to help students appreciate both the process and the principles of academic integrity.

Academic honesty can be best understood by academic ethical standards guiding faculty in their work. That is to say, an individual’s contributions, in terms of words and scholarly findings, belong to him or her alone. Furthermore, the integrity of that which one claims to be scholarly knowledge rests on the accurate demonstration of the assumptions and reasoning that produced it. These standards are used as the implicit basis for teaching and learning in the university.

In order for instructors to fairly assess the quality and quantity of a student’s learning as determined by work that students represent as their own, a relationship of trust between instructor and student is essential. Because violations of academic integrity most often involve, but are not limited to, efforts to deceive instructors, they represent a breach of the trust relationship between instructor and student and undermine the core values of the university.

Responsibility for Academic Honesty

This policy applies to all undergraduate programs and to students and faculty in some programs under the auspices of the Graduate School. Graduate School generically refers to all graduate and professional schools and students, and terms such as associate vice provost or associate/assistant dean will refer to the appropriate official in the other colleges/schools. Graduate School students should appeal to the Graduate School while professional students should appeal to the appropriate person in their college or school, i.e., Graduate School of Management or College of Health Sciences. School of Dentistry and Law School students must follow the policies put forth by their respective schools.

Academic honesty consists of truth telling and truthful representations in all academic contexts. All members of the academic community have a responsibility to ensure that academic honesty is maintained. In what follows the wording “chair” refers to either a department chair or an equivalent official, “associate dean” refers to either an associate dean or an equivalent official, or in the case of the Graduate School it will refer to the assistant vice provost for graduate programs, the word “college” refers to a college, school, or other academic unit, and the words “assigned college” refers to the degree granting college or school (i.e. for graduate students the assigned college is the Graduate School).

Faculty have primary responsibility for:

  1. Upholding and enforcing university-wide principles of academic honesty and integrity and informing students of these principles including any qualifications that may be operative in the classes they are teaching.
  2. Minimizing opportunities for academic dishonesty in their courses.
  3. Confronting students suspected of academic dishonesty in a way that respects student privacy.
  4. Affording students accused of academic dishonesty the right to appeal any resulting disputes to disinterested parties for hearing and resolution.
  5. Assigning an appropriate grade to a student who engages in academic dishonesty.
  6. Reporting all instances of academic dishonesty to the associate dean of the college offering the course.
  7. Protecting the anonymity of any student reporting an incident of academic dishonesty to the extent permitted by due process required for the accused and other legal requirements.

Students have responsibility for:

  1. Refraining from cheating and plagiarism.
  2. Refusing to aid or abet any form of academic dishonesty.
  3. Notifying professors and/or their adviser about observed incidents of academic misconduct. The anonymity of a student reporting an incident of academic dishonesty will be protected to the extent permitted by law.

Definitions of Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty applies equally to electronic media and print, and involves text, images, and ideas. It includes but is not limited to the following examples:

Cheating

  1. Copying from others during an examination.
  2. Communicating exam answers with other students during an examination.
  3. Offering another person’s work as one’s own.
  4. Taking an examination for another student or having someone take an examination for oneself.
  5. Sharing answers for a take home examination or assignment unless specifically authorized by the instructor.
  6. Tampering with an examination after it has been corrected, and then returning it for more credit.
  7. Using unauthorized materials during an examination.
  8. Allowing others to do the research and writing of an assigned paper (including use of the services of a commercial term paper company).

Dishonest Conduct

  1. Stealing or attempting to steal an examination or answer key from the instructor.
  2. Changing or attempting to change academic records without proper sanction.
  3. Submitting substantial portions of the same work for credit in more than one course without consulting all instructors involved.
  4. Intentionally disrupting the educational process in any manner.
  5. Allowing another student to copy off one’s own work during a test.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is intellectual theft. It means use of the intellectual creations of another without proper attribution. Plagiarism may take two main forms, which are clearly related: 1. To steal or pass off as one’s own the ideas or words, images, or other creative works of another and 2. To use a creative production without crediting the source, even if only minimal information is available to identify it for citation.

Credit must be given for every direct quotation, for paraphrasing or summarizing a work (in whole, or in part, in one’s own words) and for information that is not common knowledge.

Collusion

Any student who knowingly or intentionally helps another student perform any of the above acts of cheating, dishonest conduct, or plagiarism is subject to discipline for academic dishonesty.

Research Misconduct

Marquette University has a duty to ensure the integrity of research and will respond to any allegation of research misconduct in a thorough, competent, timely, objective, and fair manner. Research misconduct is defined as fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reviewing research, or in reporting research results. The University Research Misconduct Policy applies to faculty, students, and others who are employed by or affiliated with Marquette University. Students who are accused of misconduct related to grant-funded research shall be governed by the procedures outlined in the research misconduct policy. Students who are accused of misconduct related to research that is not grant-funded and is a part of a student’s academic program will be governed by the University Academic Honesty Policy of this bulletin. Any uncertainty related to which policy will govern a given situations will be decided by the research integrity officer.

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty

Regardless of how alleged acts of academic dishonesty are brought to light, faculty and instructors retain the responsibility and the authority to investigate all allegations, although, as outlined below, university administrators may lead these investigations. Because the consequences for academic dishonesty can be severe, the decision to penalize a student for such infractions must be the result of a thorough review. The procedures to be used for adjudicating suspected acts of academic dishonesty are determined by the nature of the misconduct and the seriousness of the offense.

Procedures for Incidents Of Academic Dishonesty

Students found committing acts of academic dishonesty will be subject to the Marquette University procedures for incidents of academic dishonesty. In what follows the wording “chair” refers to either a department chair or an equivalent official, “associate dean” refers to either an associate dean or an equivalent official, or in the case of the Graduate School it shall refer to the assistant vice provost, the word “college” refers to a college, school or other academic unit and the words “assigned college” refers to the college granting the degree (i.e. for graduate students the assigned college is the Graduate School).

First Offenses

Many, perhaps most, incidents of academic dishonesty involve accusations which are based on clear evidence and which are not contested by the accused student. In such cases, if the infraction is relatively minor and there is no indication that the accused student has previously been involved in such incidents, it is most appropriate that the matter be resolved between the student, the faculty member and the chair of the department offering the course.

When a faculty member has evidence of a student’s academic dishonesty, the faculty member must initiate communication with the student within 15 calendar days of discovering evidence of academic dishonesty. The faculty member must then present the evidence to the student in a private meeting, always with a facilitator present (e.g., department chair or designee). This meeting should take place within 15 calendar days of the student being notified of the allegation or as soon thereafter as possible. If, after this meeting, it is decided that the student did participate in academic dishonesty the faculty member may follow up with one or more of the following actions:

  1. Issue a reprimand to the student.
  2. Require repetition of the questionable work or examination.
  3. Reduce the grade on the questionable work or examination (faculty can reduce the grade down to and including an F or zero).
  4. Recommend that the student be administratively withdrawn from the course.
  5. Recommend that the student be given a final grade of F for the course.

The faculty must maintain careful documentation of the incident.

It is essential that any disciplinary action be reported in writing to the student in a letter from the faculty member. The faculty member is strongly encouraged to consult with his or her associate dean for questions about appropriate discipline and the form and content of the letter sent to the student. Reference to the “Marquette University Policies on Academic Honesty” should be included in the letter. The letter to the student must be sent out within 15 calendar days of the meeting and may be sent by e-mail with settings for “notify sender of receipt and of opening”. At the same time the letter is sent to the student, a copy must be sent to the department chair and associate dean of the college offering the course. In turn, within 5 working days, the associate dean of the college offering the course will communicate in writing details of the incident to the associate dean of the student’s assigned college, to ensure that penalties assessed are commensurate with the offense and that repeated infractions can be detected and dealt with appropriately. The associate dean of each college is responsible for maintaining confidential records concerning academic dishonesty of students enrolled in that college. All letters reporting faculty imposed academic penalties for academic misconduct will be included in these files.

In most incidents the disciplinary response and procedure for incidents of academic dishonesty concludes at this step.

Student’s Appeal

Students have the right of appeal of the allegations of academic dishonesty and the disciplinary actions of the instructor if the student believes the alleged incident of academic dishonesty and/or resultant academic discipline to be unfounded, biased or capricious. In this case the student should submit a formal written appeal stating the grounds for appeal and available documentation to the associate dean of the college offering the course within 15 calendar days of the notification of the instructor’s decision. Upon receipt of the appeal the associate dean may convene a review of the student’s actions by a college panel. The associate dean and/or panel reviews the details of the student’s actions and may ask to speak to the student, the instructor, the chair of the department offering the course, associate deans and others. The associate dean of the college offering the course will determine the appropriate disciplinary action and, within 15 calendar days of receipt of the appeal, will provide a written statement to all parties concerned.

Disciplinary Recommendations by Faculty of ADW or F Grades

If the faculty member recommends that the student be administratively withdrawn from the course and assigned a final grade of ADW or that a final grade of F be assigned, the associate dean of the student’s assigned college (the assistant vice provost for graduate programs) will review the details of the incident, make the final decision within 5 working days of receipt of the request and provide a written statement to all parties concerned.

Students have the right to appeal the decision of the associate dean to issue grades of ADW or F to the dean of the student’s assigned college (the dean of the Graduate School in the case of graduate students). This appeal must be made within 15 calendar days of the notification of the grade change. The final decision to uphold or modify the action of the associate dean will be provided to the student and associate dean within 15 calendar days of receipt of the appeal. The decision of the dean is final.

Repeat or More Serious Offenses

When the associate dean (in the case of graduate students to the assistant vice provost for graduate programs) of the student’s assigned college is aware of or determines that the student has engaged in multiple incidents of academic dishonesty or the incident in question is of a more serious nature he/she will convene a review of the student’s actions by a college panel within 15 calendar days of learning of the most recent incident. In the case of graduate students, such a panel will be composed of a sub-committee of the University Board of Graduate Studies. More serious incidents may involve repeat offenses, cause injury or harm to others outside the academic community or other actions deemed to warrant additional consideration. These incidents of academic dishonesty call for more serious disciplinary action up to and including campus wide sanctions of suspension or expulsion. Where incidents involve possible violations of the University Code of Conduct, in addition to the alleged academic dishonesty, consultation with the Office of Student Development is recommended.

Each college will have guidelines for the composition and selection of the college panel to assure a review by experienced faculty and/or administrators not directly involved in the incident(s). The panel reviews all aspects of the student’s record, the details of the student’s behavior and may ask the student, instructor(s) and others to speak with the panel. Within 15 calendar days of being given the charge, the panel will forward its recommendations for appropriate and just disciplinary action to the associate dean (in the case of graduate students to the assistant vice provost for graduate programs) of the student’s assigned college with a copy to the dean. All disciplinary decisions that involve a campus wide sanction, such as suspension or expulsion, will be made by the dean of the student’s assigned college with all other actions being taken by the associate dean.

Within 15 calendar days of receiving the panel’s recommendation, the associate dean or dean, as appropriate, makes the decision known to the student via written documentation that includes a description of the academic dishonesty, the process the decision went through, the resulting decision and appeal procedures. A copy of the decision is placed in the student’s academic file Located in the Office of the Registrar.

Students have the right of appeal of the allegation of academic dishonesty and the disciplinary actions of the associate dean or the dean of the student’s assigned college. Such appeals must be made within 15 calendar days of receipt of the letter. Actions taken by the associate dean should be appealed to the dean of the student’s assigned college. The final decision to uphold or modify the action of the associate dean will be provided to the student and associate dean within 15 calendar days of receipt of the appeal. The decision of the dean is final.

For actions of the dean involving campus-wide sanctions, such as suspension or expulsion, students have the right of appeal to the Office of the Provost. A formal written appeal stating the grounds for appeal and available documentation is to be submitted to the Office of the Provost within 15 calendar days of the notification of the decision of the dean. The provost or designee will conduct a review of the appeal materials, may seek additional information, and may consult with the student, faculty, chair(s), associate dean(s), deans and others. The final decision to uphold or modify the action of the dean will be provided to the student and to the dean and associate dean of the student’s assigned college within 15 calendar days of receipt of the appeal. A copy of the provost’s decision will be placed in the student academic file located in the Office of the Registrar. The decision of the provost is final.

Other Considerations

The associate dean may exclude students who have on file recorded acts of academic dishonesty, as defined by this policy, from consideration for academic honors at graduation. Exclusion from consideration for honors is not for the purposes of this policy to be considered a campus wide sanction.

Maintenance of Disciplinary Records

Records relating to academic dishonesty will be maintained by the Office of the Registrar to promote consistency of penalties for academic dishonesty and to ensure appropriate action against repeat offenders. The university will not release a student’s disciplinary records to any other person and/or entity unless authorized to do so by the student in question or when authorized by law.

Professional Ethics and Standards

These procedures do not supersede or take the place of procedures established for students who violate professional standards applicable to a particular program or college. Separate procedures and/or outcomes may be invoked when students are found in violation of professional standards or codes of ethics related to special programs, licensure or certification as determined by the program’s external or internal professional requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to know and follow these standards/codes of ethics, which are part of the student’s academic program. These special expectations and procedures, including the appeals process, will be provided to the student upon enrollment in the program and are available in published form in the administrative offices overseeing these programs.

This policy evolved from a collaborative effort that included members of the Marquette University Committee on Academic Procedures, Marquette University Board of Undergraduate Studies and the Marquette University Board of Graduate Studies. These groups would like to express their gratitude to the University of California–Irvine whose UCI Academic Senate Policy on Academic Honesty provided the framework for the resulting document.

Academic Advising

The University’s Advising Philosophy

Advising fosters intellectual, moral, and personal growth in students. It is informed by the teachings of Ignatius Loyola, who advocated that Jesuit schools should educate students who will lead and be a leaven for good. This requires that students obtain both a firm base of knowledge and a strong sense of personal responsibility. Thus, Marquette seeks to educate on both the intellectual and moral level. The mark of academic success is the ability of students to function as well-educated, responsible members of society.

Goals for Advising

The primary purpose of advising is to enhance the academic performance of students. The result of this process should be graduates who are demonstrably committed to academic excellence and who assume responsibility for their own actions. Their growth toward this goal can be observed in their ability to make sound personal and academic choices.

Advising is much more than class scheduling, although that is obviously a regular component. In the same way that formal study affects a student’s intellectual growth, advising is an ongoing developmental process that helps students discern their life/career goals, and contribute to their values, their personal fulfillment and the educational plans for reaching those goals. As part of this process, advisers can give attention to matters relating to academic performance and also be watchful for non-academic issues that could have an impact on student academic performance.

Adviser and Student Expectations

Marquette University is committed to the shaping of students’ intellectual and personal development. Academic advising contributes substantially to this mission. It assumes a good working relationship between advisers and students. At Marquette University we strive to provide advising within the following set of expectations:

Students may anticipate the following from advisers:

  1. The adviser recognizes the goal of advising is the academic success and personal growth of the student.
  2. The adviser works to develop good rapport with the student and in doing so, also serves as a mentor.
  3. The adviser has knowledge of major course content, course sequencing, the University Core of Common Studies (UCCS) and graduation requirements as provided in the bulletin.
  4. The adviser is available during his or her regular office hours or by appointment and prepares for each scheduled session by reviewing the advisee’s record before the meeting.
  5. In addition to showing common courtesy toward the advisee, the adviser listens carefully, provides encouragement and support and respects the advisee’s ability to make decisions.
  6. The adviser helps the student develop strategies for academic success and understand the possible associated consequences.
  7. The adviser identifies and addresses potential conflicts that might arise in the students’ schedule and develops a long-term schedule to avoid conflicts (e.g., prerequisites, infrequent offerings, etc.).
  8. The adviser informs advisees of opportunities and information, particularly related to majors and minors but also including internships, research, graduate and professional school opportunities.
  9. The adviser understands that academic performance can be influenced by factors unrelated to the classroom and is prepared to deal with these issues and make referrals as necessary.
  10. The adviser knows where to direct a student to additional resources when necessary.

Advisers may anticipate the following from students:

  1. The student accepts full responsibility for his or her academic success and acknowledges that the adviser is a major resource for achieving that success.
  2. The student understands bulletin information including graduation requirements.
  3. The student acknowledges that successful advising requires openness and honesty with the adviser.
  4. The student works to develop a good rapport with his or her adviser.
  5. The student has a desired expectation for his or her Marquette experience and comes to meetings prepared to discuss career goals, co-curricular interests, etc.
  6. The student prepares for advising sessions by developing semester schedules that meet certain long-term goals such as fulfilling the requirements of the UCCS and college curriculum.
  7. The student should have knowledge of the classes he or she is interested in taking as well as alternative options, and recognizes that his or her plans may change.
  8. The student shows common courtesy toward the adviser including honoring all advising appointments once scheduled.
  9. The student seeks appropriate help to solve problems that may adversely affect his or her academic performance. The student recognizes that the academic adviser is the appropriate person with whom to start this process.
  10. The student ensures that all questions and concerns are adequately addressed.

This statement evolved from a collaborative effort that included members of the Marquette University Student Government and the Committee on Academic Procedures. Reviewed by Marquette University General Counsel, February 1, 2006. Revised and approved by the University Board of Undergraduate Studies, March 1, 2006. Approved by the Academic Senate, March 20, 2006

The Klingler College of Arts and Sciences Pre-major Advising Manual (2003-2004) is the source for much of the information contained herein.

Academic Censure (Probation/Dismissal/Academic Alert)

Overview

All undergraduate students are expected to maintain a minimum of a 2.000 cumulative grade point average (GPA) in all Marquette coursework. However, there are additional requirements that may lead to academic censure, as described below.

Marquette defines academic censure in one of three categories: Academic Probation (two types): College Probation and Reinstated on Probation; Academic Dismissal (two types): Required to Withdraw for Academic Reasons and Required to Withdraw for Academic Misconduct; and the College Academic Alert. All of these censure statuses are maintained permanently on the student’s academic record; however, only three appear permanently on Marquette University's official transcript as follows:

    1. Reinstated on Probation

    2. Required to Withdraw for Academic Reasons

    3. Required to Withdraw for Academic Misconduct

While not an academic censure issue per se, the financial aid regulation requiring the university to evaluate the qualitative (GPA) satisfactory academic progress of each student is also discussed in this policy, as by federal regulations, it must be aligned with the University academic dismissal policy. The satisfactory academic progress notation will be maintained permanently on the student’s record; however, will not appear on Marquette’s official transcript. In addition, satisfactory academic progress does not impact or reverse the academic censure notations described above.

Policies/Process

Academic Probation-College Probation

A student is placed on college academic probation according to the policies of his/her individual college (see the respective college sections of the Undergraduate bulletin for details). This probation status does not impact financial aid eligibility. Likewise, financial aid eligibility does not impact or reverse academic probation.

Academic Dismissal-Required to Withdraw for Academic Reasons (RWAR)

The Office of the Registrar (OTR) and the Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) will monitor cumulative GPAs at the end of each term (fall, spring and summer).

A student who does not meet the GPA requirements listed below will be academically dismissed by the college (coded as RWAR by OTR) and the student's record will also reflect his/her failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress (coded as SAP by OSFA):

  1. A student having attempted 24 or fewer credit hours must maintain a cumulative GPA of 1.500 or higher.
  2. A student having attempted more than 24 credit hours must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.000 or higher.

In addition:

  1. Those students who have been granted an official Medical Withdrawal by the University will not be subject to RWAR for the term in which the Medical Withdrawal is approved.  They will, however, be subject to SAP for that term.
  2. Those students who withdraw from their first term at Marquette will not be subject to RWAR in that term.  They will, however, be subject to SAP for that term.
  3. Those students who choose the audit (AU) option in all classes will not be subject to RWAR or SAP for that term. However, should these students withdraw and/or receive a grade of AUA in that same term, they will be subject to RWAR and SAP.
  4. Those students enrolled in audit-only programs will not be subject to RWAR or SAP.  However, should these students withdraw from the audit-only program or classes and/or receive a grade of AUA in that same term, they will be subject to RWAR and SAP for that term.
  5. The college office will communicate RWAR and OSFA will communicate SAP via Marquette email. As per the University email policy, it is the student's responsibility to monitor his/her Marquette email at all times.
  6. A student coded with RWAR will be dropped from any classes in which he/she is subsequently registered.

RWAR/SAP Appeal process

The RWAR/SAP is appealed on one form, as per the instructions contained in the RWAR/SAP email(s) received at the end of the term.  This form is used whether the student wishes to appeal to his/her original college or to other colleges.

The Academic Censure/Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal form is posted on the Marquette Central academic forms website and includes all of the required information the student must submit in order to have his/her appeal reviewed. The college dean or dean's designee has the final decision on all RWAR/SAP appeals.

If the appeal is approved:

  1. The student will be 'Reinstated on Probation' and the college will design an academic plan for the student, outlining how the student will regain his/her satisfactory academic and degree progress standing, and the student will become financial aid eligible.
  2. The plan must be measurable and ensure that the student is able to meet Marquette's SAP standards by a specific point in time. Plans should include courses to be taken, expected grades and a time frame to complete the outlined objectives.
  3. The plan will be monitored and evaluated at the end of each term.
  4. Should the student be on a multiple term plan and the student is satisfying that plan at the end of each term, the student will not be subject to RWAR or SAP, regardless of the GPA of the student.
  5. Should the student not fulfill all of his/her academic obligations as outlined in the plan, the student will again be coded as RWAR and SAP and subject to all provisions of this policy.

Academic Dismissal-Academic Misconduct

Dismissal for academic misconduct (RWAM) is determined per the Academic Honesty policy found in the Undergraduate bulletin. Once this determination has been made, the student will be dismissed from the university. This action results in ineligibility to register at Marquette. Reinstatement criteria for the student who is dismissed, if applicable, will be outlined in the dismissal notice. If the student is allowed to return to the university, a permanent notation of ‘Reinstated to the University’ will appear on the student’s academic record and Marquette’s official transcript.

College Academic Alert (CAA)

A student who does not fall under the university RWAR or SAP criteria as outlined above, however fails to make progress in his/her particular college or major, will be barred from future registration by a CAA registration hold and may be dropped from any classes in future terms for which he/she is registered.

  1. The CAA hold is assigned by the college office and is specific to the individual college’s degree progress policies (see the respective college section of the Undergraduate bulletin). The college will communicate this information via the Marquette email. As per the University email policy, it is the student's responsibility to monitor his/her Marquette email at all times.
  2. The student may appeal the CAA to his/her original college or other colleges by using the same Academic Censure/Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal form on the Marquette Central academic forms website.
  3. If the appeal is approved, the CAA hold is removed and the student will be notified of this hold via the Marquette email.

Refer to the Complete Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy on the OSFA website for additional information on SAP.

Academic Programs Defined

An academic program is a combination of courses and related activities organized for the achievement of specific learning outcomes as defined by the University. This includes programming at both the undergraduate, graduate and professional level and consists of degrees, majors, minors, concentrations, specializations and certificates.

Degree Program

An academic program of study leading to a bachelor’s, master’s, Ph.D. or professional degree. All degree programs require a minimum number of semester credit hours, as referenced in the official bulletins of the University that are produced each academic year.

Major

A comprehensive course of study in a given discipline at the undergraduate level. A minimum of 30 semester credit hours must be earned in the major.

Minor

A course of study in a discipline or interdisciplinary cluster at the undergraduate level that is other than the student’s major area of study. A minimum of 18 semester credit hours must be earned in the minor.

Concentration

A sub-set of a discipline organized in clusters of focused courses taken within an undergraduate major. A minimum of 9 semester credit hours must be earned in the concentration.

Specialization

An integrated, coherent set of courses that define a limited topic or field of study at the graduate level that is taken within the degree program. A minimum of 12 semester credit hours must be earned in the specialization.

Certificate

A post-baccalaureate or post-master program of study offered at the graduate or professional level, in which a specific skill set is demonstrated at the end of the program, usually culminating in a capstone course. In order to earn a certificate, the program of study must be offered apart from a degree; however, the courses in a certificate program may be applied toward a graduate or professional degree program. A minimum of 12 semester credit hours must be earned in a certificate program.

Academic Standing

Students are considered to be in good standing as long as they are eligible to enroll in classes at Marquette.

Awarding Diplomas and Certificates

This policy defines and outlines the process for approval and distribution for official Marquette University certificates and diplomas.

Programs of Study Defined

  1. A degree program is defined as an approved academic program of study, outlined in a Marquette University bulletin, that contains a degree and, in the case of an undergraduate, at least one major, and leads to an official diploma and notation of such on the University’s official transcript.
  2. A certificate program is defined as an approved academic program of study, outlined in a Marquette University bulletin that includes the specialized study of a subject area and leads to an official certificate and notation of such on the University’s official transcript.
  3. An official diploma or certificate is defined as one on which the university seal is affixed and is released only by the Office of the Registrar.

 Policy

  1. Structuring of degree and certificate programs requires approval through the appropriate Marquette University curriculum process.
  2. Requirements for all Marquette academic programs of study are to be documented in the appropriate Marquette University bulletin by the college/school/department offering the degree or certificate program. No official diploma or certificate will be awarded that does not first appear in the appropriate bulletin.
  3. The college/school offering the degree or certificate program bears the responsibility for authenticating completed program requirements. Changes or exceptions in course requirements for individual students must be documented in the academic record of the student, either online, when the program of study requirements are in the University degree audit system (Academic Advisement), or, on paper when not.
  4. Diplomas and certificates will be ordered and issued only by the Office of the Registrar, in consultation with the appropriate college/school of the student and the Office of the Provost.
  5. Diplomas and certificates cannot be earned retroactively. Students must first apply for graduation, satisfy all applicable degree/course/credit requirements and appear on the Trustee’s List before a diploma or certificate will be produced or posted to the student’s official academic record. Students may not appear on the Trustee’s List until all applicable degree/course/credit requirements are satisfied. The posting date of the diploma or certificate will be the earliest available diploma/certificate date after the student appears on a Trustee’s List.
  6. No student will be allowed to officially declare a degree or certificate program once it has been discontinued, except those who entered the university in an academic year prior to the discontinuation and maintained continuous enrollment on the same academic level as the discontinued program (i.e., undergraduate, graduate, etc.) until completion of his/her program of study. Once a student fails to register for one term (except summer), or graduates from a program of study, he/she has failed to maintain continuous enrollment on that academic level, even if readmitted to the same academic level.
  7. When certification of a specific skill or acknowledgement of completion of a learning experience is needed, university administrators and deans are authorized to prepare and issue a letter acknowledging completion of such program on official letterhead, or produce a document recognizing the experience; however, the document must include the name of the issuing college/school and the University seal may not be used on these documents.
  8. A letter or other document certifying completion of a course is not considered an official diploma or certificate; and therefore, will not be posted to the student’s official academic record.

Attendance

The undergraduate attendance policy specifies the role of the student, the instructor and university administrators in cases when students are absent from one or more classes. The policy aims to clarify several aspects of attendance, including, but not limited to the following five. Read the entire policy for full details.

  1. With few exceptions, no distinction is made between excused and unexcused absences.
  2. Instructors determine if work (including tests and examinations) may be made up as a result of one or more absences.
  3. University offices do not provide documentation of absences.
  4. Students may be withdrawn from a course as a result of excessive absences.
  5. Lack of participation in an online course may lead to the recording of an absence for the student.

Students are responsible for attending all class meetings for courses in which they are registered. Any absence, regardless of the reason, prevents students from getting the full benefit of the course and as such, no distinction is made between excused and unexcused absences, with the following exceptions (see below for further guidance):

  1. Absences resulting from legal obligations (such as jury duty).
  2. Absences resulting from university sanctioned activities and related travel.

Instructors should determine and notify students in writing the first day of class, preferably in the course syllabus, if any component of the grade is based on attendance and/or participation, and whether or not the opportunity to make up missed work, including assignments, quizzes, examinations and so forth, will be provided.  If so, instructors should specify the conditions students must meet to be given the opportunity to make up missed work.  The opportunity to make up work is considered a privilege, not a right.

Since it is up to each student to understand and abide by each instructor’s policy on issues related to attendance, students should consult the instructor if any portion is not understood.  If an instructor does not provide information about make up work in writing, students can expect to be given a reasonable amount of time to complete work this is missed as a result of being absent.

The Marquette Health Clinic does not provide documentation of illness, or of a visit to the Marquette Health Clinic. Likewise, college and other university offices (e.g., Office of the Dean, Counseling Center and Student Affairs) do not provide documentation of an absence on behalf of the student. When an extended absence of a week or more is expected or occurs, the student, or a family member if the student is unable, should communicate with the college office as soon as possible, after which the college office may notify faculty and others, as appropriate.

Regardless of the reason for the absence, students are responsible for learning what happened in class. Students who anticipate missing one or more class periods should contact the instructor ahead of time, just as they should contact their instructor as soon as possible after an absence.  Students are responsible for monitoring their absences during the term.

Since attendance is taken at the discretion of the faculty member, the following distinction is made for withdrawals that occur in courses where attendance is regularly taken, and withdrawals that occur in courses where attendance is not regularly taken:

  1. For courses in which attendance is regularly taken, an instructor or college office may withdraw a student from a course due to excessive absences and assign a grade of WA (Withdrawn-Excessive Absences).  In these cases, instructors must document the dates of absenteeism.
    -Such action may be initiated, for example, in a 16-week course when the number of class hours missed exceeds twice the number of course credits.  As such, a student may be assigned the grade of WA when more than 6 classes have been missed in a 3 credit course, when more than 8 classes have been missed in a 4 credit course and when more than 10 classes have been missed in a 5 credit course.
    -As examples:  students who miss more than 6 classes in a 3 credit course that meets 50 minutes, 3 times per week, will be considered to have excessive absences and may be assigned a WA.  Likewise, students who miss more than 4 classes in a 3 credit course that meets 75 minutes, 2 times per week, will be considered to have excessive absences and may be assigned a WA.
    -Students assume all consequences that ensue as a result of receiving a WA grade. These consequences include, but are not limited to:  a delay in graduation, loss of eligibility for certain scholarships or financial aid, loss of full-time student status.
  2. For those courses in which attendance is not taken on a regular basis, an instructor or college office may withdraw a student when it becomes apparent that the student has excessive absences.  In such cases, a student’s last date of attendance is determined by the last date of participation in an academically-related activity for the course including, but not limited to: an exam or quiz, a submitted assignment, participation in a lab activity, or in computer-assisted instruction.

Online Courses and Attendance

Online courses at Marquette University are designed to be highly interactive and collaborative, as authentic learning takes place within a social context.  To help ensure an effective learning experience, all students in online courses are expected to participate on a regular basis.  Participation is defined as “submitting required work as assigned; being an active contributor and responder to fellow students and the instructor in a timely basis, as set forth by online discussion guidelines in each course.” Failure to participate may be counted as an absence.  If technical circumstances prevent a student from entering the course site for a period of time, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor in a timely manner if the student wishes to receive credit for any missed online activities.

The above two sections represent university attendance standards.  Each undergraduate college may enforce additional attendance policies for certain courses; consult your college handbook, college section of the current bulletin, or the individual course syllabus/attendance policy for more information.

Absences Related to Legal Obligations or University Activities 

Students who fulfill a legal obligation such as jury duty, or participate in an officially sanctioned university activity, should be given the opportunity to make up class examinations or other graded assignments that are missed as a result of this participation or related travel.

It is recognized that sometimes an exam or graded assignment is impossible to make up. Some faculty may assign collaborative projects that depend on other classmates, or oral presentations that incorporate questioning by the entire class, or may use evaluative methods that cannot easily be replicated by the instructor.  This policy does not prohibit any member of the faculty from making the determination that certain course work cannot be made up.  Faculty who intend to deny the opportunity to make up certain exams or projects because of absences resulting from legal obligations or university sanctioned activities and related travel, must inform the student of these consequences (reduced grade or otherwise) in writing, at the beginning of the class (preferably in the course syllabus).

Other than the above situations, examinations or other assignments missed as a result of legal obligations or university sanctioned activities and related travel, may be made up.  The manner in which the work will be made up is left to the discretion of each individual faculty member.

In order to minimize the difficulties for both students and instructors caused by absences due to legal obligations, or university sanctioned activities and related travel:

  1. Students should:
  • Make every effort to schedule classes that will minimize conflicts caused by these activities and related travel.
  • Provide a schedule of all activities and related travel to all their instructors within the first week of each semester, or as soon as possible for non-scheduled events.
  • Obtain any class notes or other course material missed due to these absences, prior to taking any subsequent examinations or submitting any subsequent graded assignments.
  • Make arrangements with the instructor to make up any missed work, prior to any of these absences.

    2.  Faculty should:

  • Develop with the student, an agreed upon and mutually acceptable resolution as to how missed classroom activities and missed work will be handled as a result of these activities, if make-up work is allowed in the faculty policy.

The above section represents university standards for absences due to legal obligations and university sanctioned activities and related travel; each undergraduate college may have additional requirements for students enrolling in its courses.

Audit

Students who wish to audit courses without earning credit must present evidence of their preparation for the course or courses in which they wish to enroll. Auditors are required to attend all classes but are not required to complete written course assignments or examinations.  Certain courses may not be audited, such as University Core of Common Studies and courses in the major (check with your college to determine other courses that cannot be audited).

Students must first register for the course via CheckMarq, then request the audit option from the student’s college office with the Audit Request form located on the Marquette Central academic forms website. Auditing a class must be approved by the college.  The deadline to request the audit option for each session is the last day to register for the class as listed on the Academic Calendar.

Classification

An undergraduate student must have earned 24 credit hours before being classified as a sophomore; 60 hours before being classified as a junior and 92 hours before being classified as a senior.

Commencement

Commencement at Marquette is a symbolic ceremony provided for students, faculty and families in celebration of our students’ accomplishments. Following is the policy regulating participation in the University Commencement.

  1. Marquette offers one Commencement per year. Commencement will be held in May, following the spring term.
  2. Spring Graduates:
    • Undergraduate/Master's/Health Sciences Professional students: students who are in good standing, have met the appropriate graduation application deadline and will complete their degree requirements, including the official recording of any transfer work by the end of the spring term may participate in Commencement held in the same calendar year.
    • Dental students: students who are in good academic standing, have met the appropriate graduation application deadline and will complete their degree requirements, including the official recording of any transfer work by the end of the spring term will participate in Commencement held in the same calendar year.
    • Doctoral students: candidates must have met the appropriate graduation application deadline, have any transfer credit officially recorded, successfully defended their dissertation, received approval by their dissertation committee for any required revisions, submitted their dissertation to the Graduate School, and received approval of the dissertation format by the Graduate School before the published deadline in order to participate in the Commencement held in the same calendar year.
    • Law students: students who are in good academic standing, have met the appropriate graduation application deadline and will complete their degree requirements, including the official recording of any transfer work by the end of the spring term will participate in Commencement and will be hooded and honored at the Law School May Hooding Ceremony of the same calendar year.
  3. Summer and Fall Graduates:
    • Undergraduate/Master's/Health Sciences Professional students: students who are in good academic standing, have met the appropriate graduation application deadline and will complete their degree requirements, including the official recording of any transfer work after the May Commencement ceremony of a given calendar year, may participate in the Commencement held in that calendar year, or may choose to participate in the Commencement held in the following calendar year.
    • Doctoral students: candidates who complete their degree/dissertation requirements (see #2 above) after the May Commencement ceremony of a given calendar year, will be hooded and honored at a Hooding Ceremony hosted by the Graduate School in December, or may participate in Commencement held in the following calendar year.
    • Law students: 
      a. Summer graduates: students who are in good academic standing, have met the appropriate graduation application deadline and will complete their degree requirements, including the official recording of any transfer work in the the summer term after May Commencement of a given calendar year, may participate in the May Commencement ceremony of that same calendar year, and will be hooded and honored at a May Hooding Ceremony hosted by the Law School; or may choose to be hooded and honored at a December Hooding Ceremony hosted by the Law School of that same calendar year. 

      b. Fall graduates: students who complete their degree requirements in the fall term of a given calendar year may be hooded and honored in the December Hooding Ceremony, hosted by the Law School and may participate in the May Commencement of the following calendar year; or may participate in both the May Commencement and May Hooding Ceremony of the following calendar year.
  4. Students' names/degrees appear in the Commencement Program in which they participate; however, for those students who are in degree programs that award graduation honors and choose to participate in commencement before completion of degree requirements, honors will not be noted in the program.
  5. Degree conferral is certified by the official Marquette transcript noting the degree completion. Receipt of a diploma or participating in the commencement ceremony does not constitute certification of degree conferral.
  6. Any exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Provost.

Commencement Notification

The Office of the President sends one invitation/announcement to the name indicated on the Graduation Application each graduating student submits online via the Student Center in CheckMarq. However, there is no limit to the number of family members and friends who may attend the university-wide Commencement exercises; tickets are not needed. For further information on the university-wide ceremony, contact University Special Events at (414) 288-7431 or visit the Commencement website.  College Commencement ceremony, if occurring, may require tickets.  For further information on college ceremonies, contact the appropriate college office.

Conferral of Degrees and Certificates

The process for determining diploma or certificate conferral dates and the distribution of diplomas, certificate and transcripts with degrees posted is outlined below. Refer to the Academic Calendar for the dates of all these processes.


The Friday after May Commencement-the Friday before the end of summer term graduation

  1. Students may have degrees or certificates conferred every Friday, as long as all required grades are recorded in CheckMarq and all degree requirements are completed according to the college/school's schedule.
  2. Colleges/Schools will verify degrees/certificates and must submit a list of those graduating to the Provost's Office by noon of the appropriate Friday.
  3. The Office of the Registrar will post the degrees/certificates of all students who appear on the graduation list, the following week.
  4. Diploma or certificate conferral date = the Friday the list is submitted.
  5. Transcripts with degrees/certificates posted are available the week after the graduation list is submitted.
  6. The Office of the Registrar will order diplomas or certificates for these students after the graduation list is submitted.
  7. These diplomas and certificates are available for mailing or pick-up 4-6 weeks after the graduation list is submitted.

September-November and January-April

  1. Students may have degrees or certificates conferred the last business day of the month, as long as all required grades are recorded in CheckMarq and all degree/certificate requirements are completed according to the college/school's schedule.
  2. Colleges/Schools will verify degrees/certificates and must submit a list of those graduating to the Provost's Office by noon of the last business day of the month.
  3. The Office of the Registrar will post the degrees/certificates of all students who appear on the graduation list the following week.
  4. Diploma or certificate conferral date = the last business day of the month.
  5. Transcripts with degrees/certificates posted are available the week after the graduation list is submitted.
  6. Office of the Registrar will order diplomas or certificates for these students after the graduation list is submitted.
  7. These diplomas and certificates are available for mailing or pick-up 4-6 weeks after the graduation list is submitted.

May, December and the end of summer term graduation in August

  1. Students may have degrees or certificates conferred as long as all required degree/certificate requirements are completed according to the college/school's schedule.
  2. Colleges/Schools will verify degrees/certificates and submit graduation lists to the Provost's Office. Refer to the Academic Calendar for the exact date.
  3. Refer to the appropriate Academic Calendar for the diploma or certificate conferral date.
  4. The Office of the Registrar will post the degrees/certificates of all students who appear on the graduation list.
  5. Refer to the Academic Calendar for the exact date diplomas and certificates are available for pick-up at Marquette Central or for mailing from the Office of the Registrar.
  6. Refer to the Academic Calendar for the exact date transcripts with degrees or certificates posted are available from the Office of the Registrar.

Course Levels

Lower-division courses are numbered 1000-2999 and normally are taken by freshmen and sophomores. Upper-division courses are numbered 3000-4999 and normally are taken by juniors and seniors. Students must earn a minimum of 32 Marquette upper-division credits in order to earn a degree at Marquette.

Credit

The semester hour is the unit of academic credit used by Marquette University. Following is the minimally required contact hours for classes and is based on a 15-week semester:

  1. Classroom Based Courses:  must meet a minimum of 50 minutes per credit per week.  In addition, it is assumed that an additional workload will be assigned to equal 2 hours of coursework outside the classroom for each 50 minutes of meeting time (e.g., a total of 170 minutes per credit, per week).
  2. Blended and Non-Classroom Based Courses:  must include some form of instruction and/or homework, and/or activity that equals a minimum of 170 minutes per credit, per week.
  3. Those courses that meet in a compressed format (i.e., fewer that 15 weeks), must make up the minimum of 170 minutes per credit, per week within the timeframe of the course offering.

Semester hour credit is given only in accordance with descriptions for individual courses, as published in the Undergraduate Bulletin.  No credit is given for a course in which a student has not registered.

Credit for courses pursued at another educational institution while simultaneously enrolled at Marquette (concurrent registration) will not be allowed unless specifically authorized by the dean. See Study at Other Institutions policy of this bulletin.

Credit Load

The following colleges have established a maximum credit load allowed for students whose degree/major fall within that college:

Undergraduate degree student enrolled in: Max. credits fall term and spring term (total per term) Max. credits summer term (per session total/total per term)
Arts and Sciences20 credits8 / 16
Business Administration19 credits8 / 16
Communication19 credits8 / 16
Education18 credits8 / 16
Engineering20 credits8 / 16
Health Sciences19 credits8 / 16
Nursing18 credits8 / 16
Professional Studies18 credits8 / 16

The Fall and Spring schedule for full-time undergraduate student is normally 15-18 credit hours.  Non-degree students are normally limited to a maximum of seven credit hours each term.

An upperclassman may be allowed, with consent of the dean/dean designee, to carry more than the maximum college established credit load.

Credit for courses pursued at another institution while simultaneously enrolled at Marquette (concurrent registration) will not be allowed unless specifically authorized by the dean/dean designee of the student's degree.

Credit by Marquette Examination

Marquette recognizes that students by virtue of independent study, previous training or experience may already possess mastery of the content of a particular course in which they have not been formally registered. To enable students to enrich or accelerate their course of study, the university provides for the establishment of academic credit by means of a special Marquette examination. This credit is granted only to degree-seeking matriculated students who earn a C or better on the exam and is the equivalent of the credit the student would have earned had he or she actually been enrolled in the course at Marquette and successfully completed it. Students wishing to establish credit by Marquette examination should submit a request for such examination to the office of their dean or director.

Enrollment Status

The undergraduate enrollment status is based on enrolled credit hours each semester. A full-time enrollment status means a student is enrolled in a minimum of 12 credits; a half-time academic load means a student is enrolled in 6-11 credits; enrollment in fewer than 6 credits is considered less than half-time status for the student.

Examinations (Midterm and Final)

Midterm Exams/Grades

The university requires that midterm grades be assigned to students in most undergraduate courses and that these grades be based on appropriate written evidence of achievement at the time of grading. Midterm grades are assigned mid-way through the fall and spring term, as per the deadline in the Academic Calendar. Mid-term grades will be factored into the final grade assigned at the end of the session in which the class is scheduled.  The University deadline for changing of the I grade does not apply to mid-term grades and as such, any missing assignments/exams that contributed to a mid-term I grade must be completed by the end of the session.

The undergraduate courses in which faculty have the option to assign a midterm grade are these: Exchange; Marquette-Led Study Abroad; Workshop/Institute/Studio; Practicum/Clinical/Field Experience/Student Teaching; Internship/Externship; Independent Study/Research; Senior Capstone; Senior Project; Senior Thesis. If midterm grades are, or are not, to be assigned in these courses, the instructor will include this information in his/her syllabus distributed at the beginning of the term. All other undergraduate courses require a midterm grade. Make-up examinations are at the discretion of the instructor, as outlined in the instructor’s attendance policy.

Final Exams/Grades

Final examinations are held in most subjects. A student’s achievement during the term/session in each of his or her subjects and, expressed as a letter grade, is based on the combined results of class work, examinations and any other grading criteria set forth in the course syllabus. Once a final permanent grade is assigned, no additional work may be submitted.

Should a student have more than three final examinations scheduled on one day, and these examinations are not in the form of a team project presentation, a take-home examination or a final paper, he/she has the option to reschedule one of those final examinations. The student must contact his/her college office prior to examination week to reschedule an examination. The decision as to which examination will be rescheduled is at the discretion of the college.

A student who misses a final examination risks receiving an F grade for the course. Students are held to the standard, as outlined in the instructor's attendance policy, which is distributed at the beginning of each term. In addition, make-up examinations are at the discretion of the instructor, as outlined in the instructor’s attendance policy.

Faculty Grading

All official grades are entered by the primary instructor of the course into CheckMarq (not D2L), by the grading deadline for each session, as published in the Academic Calendar and are based on the work students completed during the session in which the class was offered.  Once a final permanent grade is assigned, no additional work may be submitted. While other approved personnel of the university may assist the faculty in grade submission on the university’s course management system (D2L); only the primary instructor may enter and approve the grades in CheckMarq. Note: Students other than TAs assigned to either teach or assist in a particular class are not considered 'approved personnel' for assisting with grades, even if trained on FERPA.

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Marquette University notifies its students each term of their rights to inspect, amend and prevent disclosure of their education records. For further information, consult Marquette’s FERPA policy, located on the Marquette Central academic policies website.  

Placement in Foreign Language Courses

Students in the Klingler College of Arts and Sciences, international business majors in the College of Business Administration, College of Education and speech pathology and audiology majors in the College of Health Sciences must satisfy a foreign language requirement for graduation. This may be accomplished by placement, course work or both. The goal of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures is to place students in the most appropriate level of foreign language study based on their previous exposure to the language.

Foreign Language Requirement

The following procedures have been established by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for placement in foreign language courses:

  1. Students who have never studied the language, or who are beginning the study of a new language, do not have to take a placement examination. They should register for an Elementary Language course numbered 1001.
  2. Students who have earned high school credit in French, German, or Spanish, and who plan to continue with the study of that language must take the WebCAPE Placement Examination to determine placement in the appropriate course.
  3. Students who place in , but have studied two or more years of the language at the high school level, must register for the SPAN 1003 Intensive Elementary Spanish, if they plan to continue study in that language. is limited to new language learners or those who have studied the language less than two years.
  4. Students who have completed two years or less of Arabic, Chinese, Classical Greek, Latin or Italian in high school, and who plan to continue with the study of that language should register for an Elementary Language course numbered 1001. Students with three years or more of high school study should register for an Intermediate Language course numbered 2001. Students should consult with the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures if they have any questions regarding the placement in these levels.
  5. Students who are native or near-native speakers of Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian or Spanish are not eligible to register in the elementary or intermediate levels of their native language for credit. Registration in these courses may result in no credit being awarded for the course. Students should consult with the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures regarding the appropriate level for which to register.
  6. Students who are native or near-native speakers of French, German or Spanish, and who plan to continue advanced study of that language must first take the WebCAPE Placement Exam in that language to determine the level of proficiency. After taking the exam, students must consult with the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures before registering for an advanced foreign language course. Native speakers of other languages should consult with the records office in their college regarding possible exemption from the foreign language requirement.
  7. Students who have spent six weeks or more studying in a French, German or Spanish-speaking country must take the WebCAPE Placement Examination, and consult with the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures before registering for a foreign language course.
  8. Students who have college credit for a foreign language course from another university (including Cooperative Academic Partnership Program (CAPP) courses in high school) must have their transcripts sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and should consult with the Registrar and their College office regarding the transfer of foreign language credit, and the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures before registering for a foreign language course. Students with college credit should not take the WebCAPE Placement Examination since placement will be determined by the college credit transferred.
  9. Students who have taken the Advanced Placement Exam or the International Baccalaureate Exam and have received credit for a course in a foreign language or literature should refer to the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures’ website for recommendations on the appropriate course for which to register.

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures will review the results of the placement examination in conjunction with other information, such as number of years that the language was studied, grades earned, etc. The department reserves the right to change the student’s placement in a course if it believes that the student has not been placed at the appropriate level, or in the most appropriate course based on the student’s exposure to the language. Students who believe they were misplaced on the basis of the placement test score should consult the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Students may not place themselves, or change their placement without departmental approval. Registration in a course lower than the approved level may result in no credit being awarded for the course. Further information on the procedures and instructions regarding the WebCAPE Placement Examination can be found on the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures’ website.

Placement Credit in Foreign Languages

Students who enter Marquette University who have studied or have had previous exposure to French, German, Classical Greek, Italian, Latin or Spanish, and who plan to continue the study of that language must follow the placement procedures established by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. They may be eligible to apply for three to six hours of special placement credit dependent upon the level in which they are placed, and the completion of that course with a grade of B or better (plus earn credit for the course in which they are enrolled).

For example: if a student places in an Intensive Intermediate course in French, German or Spanish numbered 2003 and completes the course with a grade of B or better, he or she may be eligible to apply for three hours of special placement credit (plus earn four credits for course 2003). If a student places in a French, German or Spanish course numbered 3001 and completes the course with a grade of B or better, he or she may be eligible to apply for six hours of special placement credit (plus earn three credits for the course in which the student is enrolled). The grade awarded for the special placement credit will be an S (Satisfactory) which will be noted on the student’s transcript. These credits will only count toward the total hours needed for graduation from Marquette, and cannot be used toward the completion of a major or minor in the language. Such special placement credit is not automatic. It is the student’s responsibility to complete an Application for Placement Credit in Foreign Languages form in his or her first language course at Marquette. If the student is awarded the special placement credits, they will be noted on his or her transcript at the end of the semester after the course was completed. Eligibility Requirements for Special Placement Credit:

  1. The student must have earned the high school credits for the language in question from a U.S. high school.
  2. The student may not be a native speaker or equivalent of the language, nor have resided in a country where the language is spoken for more than six months.
  3. The student may not have college credit in the language (including Advanced Placement (AP) credit, credit by examination, or transfer credit from another institution).
  4. The student may not have previously audited a college course in the language or enrolled in, and then withdrawn from, a course in the language after the third week of the term.

Grade Appeals

Undergraduate students may appeal any final course grade that the student believes to be in significant violation of clearly established written policies, a result of improper procedures or discriminatory. Before initiating a formal grade appeal, the student must consult with the instructor assigning the grade and present evidence why the student believes the grade to be in error. If this does not lead to resolution, the student may initiate, in writing, a formal grade appeal. To be considered, the written appeal must be submitted no later than the deadline for the removal of incompletes, as noted in the Academic Calendar. However, it may be in the student’s best interest to appeal sooner than this deadline if his/her academic progress is dependent on the outcome of the appeal. In addition, the student should consult with the college or school offering the course for which the grade is being appealed to determine if other requirements for the written appeal are in force.

The written appeal must be submitted to the chair of the department offering the course or, in schools or colleges with no departmental structure, to the associate dean. The written appeal must provide the reason(s) the student believes the recorded grade is incorrect. The student may present evidence of his/her performance and may also request that all other pertinent materials be supplied by the instructor. The chair, or associate dean, will collect and analyze the evidence in a timely manner. Evidence will be gathered through consultations with the instructor, the student and any witnesses. These consultations may be in person, by phone or by electronic means. Hard copies of relevant documents may also be requested. The chair, or associate dean, will evaluate the appeal or choose to designate an ad hoc committee for this purpose. The chair, associate dean, or ad hoc committee will consider the appeal and evidence and make one of the following decisions: the assigned grade should remain, the course instructor is asked to reconsider the grade in light of information collected and the reconsidered grade will stand, or a grade change is warranted. The decision will be communicated in writing within thirty days to the student and the instructor with copies of the formal response placed in the student’s file and forwarded to the dean and any indicated grade changes filed with the registrar.

The student has the right to appeal the decision of the chair, associate dean, or ad hoc committee, to the dean. This appeal must be submitted in writing no later than fourteen days from the date of the formal response. The dean will review the procedural evidence, which now includes all the evidence previously gathered, the student’s appeal letters and the formal response from the chair, associate dean or ad hoc committee, and will render the final decision on the grade appeal. The decision will be communicated in writing within thirty days to the student and the instructor with copies of the formal response place in the student’s file and any indicated grade changes filed with the registrar.

Grading System

Marquette uses the grade point system to determine a student’s academic grade point average, academic censure and his/her eligibility to graduate (see Graduation Requirements section of this bulletin.) Each grade (A through F) earned in a course carries a specified number of grade points. The grade points earned in any given course equal the grade point value of the grade multiplied by the total number of semester hours credited. A student’s grade point average is found by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of semester hours credited in those courses for which grade points have been assigned.  The official Marquette GPA of all students is calculated by the student information system and this GPA will not be rounded up or down for any reason.

All undergraduate students must maintain a cumulative grade point average, as outlined in the Undergraduate Academic Censure policy in this bulletin.

Letter grades with or without grade points are used, by Marquette faculty to evaluate a student's performance in a course.  All grades described below, with the exception of the I, IC and IE grades are permanent grades.  No additional work may be submitted by the student once permanent grades are assigned during final grading for the session in which the class is offered.  Likewise, no additional work may be submitted once the deadline to change the temporary grades of I, IC or IE has passed.
 

Grade Achievement Grade Points
ASuperior4.0
AB3.5
BGood3.0
BC2.5
CSatisfactory2.0
CD1.5
D1.0
FFailing0.0

Former students who are applying for readmission should consult their respective deans for information concerning the application of any new grading policy to their earlier academic records.

The following letter grades do not have associated grade points:

Grade Defined
ADWAdministrative Withdrawal; a permanent grade indicating student was withdrawn from the course by the university for administrative reasons.
AUAudit; a permanent grade indicating course is excluded from attempted credits.
AUAAudit; a permanent grade indicating course is included in attempted credits for Satisfactory Academic Progress purposes.
CRCredit; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of C or better in the course.
IIncomplete; a temporary grade indicating inability to complete the course and/or take the final exam, due to circumstances beyond the control of the student; and, therefore, completion of assignments/exam will be allowed after the term has ended.
ICCourse Incomplete; a temporary grade indicating the course is not completed by the end of the term in which the course is scheduled; assigned to all students enrolled in the course.
IEIncomplete Extension; a temporary grade indicating an extension to the I grade removal deadline; assigned by the college office to those students who, due to circumstances beyond their control were unable to complete the required work by the I grade removal deadline.
NCNo Credit; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of less than C in the course.
SNCSatisfactory completion; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of C or better in a course bearing no credit.
UNCUnsatisfactory completion; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of less than C in a course bearing no credit.
SSatisfactory completion; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of C or better in a credit bearing, competency-based course.
SYSatisfactory completion; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of C or better in the first term of a series of year-long courses, where grades are assigned only in the final course in the series.
UUnsatisfactory completion; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of less that C in a credit bearing, competency-based course.
UWUnexcused withdrawal; a permanent grade indicating withdrawal initiated by the faculty or college office when a student registered for a course, never attended and failed to officially withdraw.
UYUnsatisfactory completion; a permanent grade indicating equivalent work of less than C in the first term of a series of year-long courses, where grades are assigned only in the final course in the series.
WOfficial Withdrawal; a permanent grade indicating withdrawal initiated by the student, with approval of the college office.
WAWithdrawn-Excessive Absences; a permanent grade indicating withdrawal initiated by the faculty or college office due to excessive absences in the course.

Clarification of Grades

ADW Grade

The ADW grade indicates that the student was withdrawn from the course for administrative reasons, as determined by approved personnel of the university, including, but not limited to the dean, or members of a committee involved in a formal hearing and/or an appeal process.

Any student who is administratively withdrawn from the university will receive this grade in all classes for the term/session. Likewise any student who is administratively withdrawn from a single class, will receive this grade in the class. Administrative withdrawal is an action normally taken by the university for disciplinary, conduct, lack of professional competence or academic reasons other than low grades or lack of degree progress. This grade is assigned by the college office or the Office of the Registrar depending on the reason and the office requesting the administrative withdrawal.  This grade will take precedence over any other grade assigned to the student. Students assume responsibility for all consequences that ensue as a result of receiving any withdrawal grade. These consequences may include, but are not limited to: a delay in graduation, external institutions/entities viewing these grades as failing grades, loss of eligibility for certain scholarships and/ or financial aid, loss of full-time status and/or loss of a refund.

CD and D Grades

The policy on CD and D grades earned in courses taken at Marquette University differs for students in the various colleges, schools and programs. See the pertinent sections of this bulletin for statements of individual policy.

CR/NC Option

For enrichment purposes, junior and senior students are given an option to elect one course per term (to a maximum of four courses) for which only a CR or NC grade is assigned. This course must be a true elective in the individual’s program, the prerequisites for which the student has met. Courses excluded are those taken in fulfillment of the requirements for the Core of Common Studies, courses for the major or minor including teacher certification and the like or special courses excluded by the individual colleges, schools or programs. Arrangements to take a course under the CR/NC option must be made no later than the end of registration by completing the Credit/No Credit Grading Option request form available online on the Marquette Central academic forms website.

The deadline to apply for this grading option is published in the Academic Calendar.  After this date, the student does not have the option of changing from CR/NC to regular grading or from regular grading to the CR/NC option.

I Grade

This grade must be approved by the instructor prior to the end of the term in which the class is offered and must be assigned by the instructor prior to the final grading deadline for the term/session in which the class is offered.  The student must have a circumstance beyond his/her control in order to be assigned this grade.  In addition, the student's performance in the course must merit this exception, otherwise, the instructor will assign a grade that reflects both the quality of the work completed and the significance of the work/exam that has not been completed.

This grade is cleared through the college office of the college offering the course.  If not cleared or changed to the grade of IE by the date specified in the Academic Calendar the grade will automatically become a grade of F.  Because these grades denote that the student did not fulfill all course requirements and/or the final exam, the university views these grades with the same seriousness as the grade of F.

Any exception to the assignment of this grade must be approved by the college offering the course.

IC Grade

This grade is not the result of any action or inaction by the student.  This grade will be changed to a permanent grade by the faculty at the time the course is completed and no initiation is needed by the student.  The permanent grade must be assigned within one year of the assigned IC grade.

IE Grade

This grade must be approved and entered on the student's record prior to the deadline to remove the I grade, as indicated in the Academic Calendar.  This grade is added by the college office of the college offering the course via the Grade Change form located in the Faculty Center of CheckMarq.  The grade is cleared by that same office.  If not cleared by the date specified in the notification provided to the student at the time of the extension, the grade will automatically become a permanent grade of F.

UW Grade

This withdrawal is initiated by the faculty or college office when a student registered for a course, never attended and failed to officially withdraw.

The fact that a student did not attend class, does not relieve that student of the obligation to pay any tuition and/or fees that are due. Students assume responsibility for all consequences that ensue as a result of receiving any withdrawal grade. Theses consequences may include, but are not limited to: a delay in graduation, external institutions/entities viewing these grades as failing grades loss of eligibility for certain scholarships and/or financial aid, loss of full-time status and/or loss of the 100% refund. Refund calculation for this grade will be based on the date the University is first informed of the non-attendance.

W Grade

Students who initiate this withdrawal assume responsibility for all consequences that ensue as a result of receiving any withdrawal grade. These consequences include, but are not limited to: a delay in graduation, external institutions/entities viewing these grades as failing grades, loss of eligibility for certain scholarships and/or financial aid, loss of full-time status and/or loss of a refund.

WA Grade

The WA withdrawal is initiated by the faculty or college office and is assigned due to excessive absences in the course, or when the student is found to be in violation of the Undergraduate Attendance Policy section of this bulletin; once assigned, the WA grade cannot be overwritten by a W grade.

Graduation

Graduation Requirements

Students are required to graduate at the end of the term in which all degree requirements are completed.  Normally undergraduate students must meet the graduation requirements which are stated in the Undergraduate Bulletin issued for the year in which they entered Marquette. Substitutions or waivers for specific courses required for degree completion may occur, as determined by the college. It is to be expected that these course exceptions will occur in the case of any student whose enrollment period extends for more than eight years.

Students whose enrollment is interrupted for two or more consecutive terms normally must meet the requirements in the bulletin issued for the year in which they return to the university. The college may determine that a readmitted student will fall under a different set of degree requirements than the academic year in which he/she is readmitted. Students are responsible for keeping themselves informed of the requirements which apply in their particular cases. Every student has  faculty advisers available who will assist in planning and implementing the student’s plan of studies; however, it is ultimately each student’s responsibility to know and fulfill the requirements for graduation specified for the selected plan. This should be done not only by utilization of specific advisers, but also with Academic Advisement, the University’s online degree audit tool on CheckMarq provided to all undergraduates.  With Academic Advisement, students can track their degree progress until graduation. It is the responsibility of the student to immediately bring any discrepancies found in Academic Advisement to the attention of the college.

A candidate for a baccalaureate degree must meet the following graduation requirements:

1. In all undergraduate colleges and programs a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.000             must be earned for graduation.

2. For additional college requirements, see individual colleges, as indicated below:

3. A minimum of 60 Marquette credits are required to earn a Marquette undergraduate degree.

4. For students admitted in Summer 2010 or beyond, the final 30 credits needed to complete a Marquette undergraduate degree must be earned as Marquette credits, unless those credits are earned in an approved study abroad program; for students admitted prior to Summer 2010, 30 of the final 36 requirements needed to complete a Marquette undergraduate degree must be Marquette credits, unless these credits are earned in an approved study abroad program.

5. A minimum of 32 upper-division Marquette credits are required to earn a Marquette undergraduate degree.

6. A minimum of 15 Marquette credits in the major are required to earn a Marquette undergraduate degree.

7. The student must attend any course, lectures, or any other exercises which may be required, even though such activities receive no recognition in terms of credit hours.

8. The student must file a formal application for a degree by the deadline published in the Academic Calendar; however, because students are required to graduate at the end of the term in which all degree requirements are complete, the University reserves the right to graduate a student without a graduation application on file.

9. Commencement is held in May, after the spring term.  Participation in commencement does not mean the student has graduated. See the Commencement Policy in this section for further details.

10. Exceptions to this Graduation Requirements policy must be approved by the Office of the Provost, except:

  • the course and bulletin year exceptions listed in paragraph 1 (approved by the college)
  • number 7 (approved by the college)

Graduation Honors

The grade point average is used to compute graduation honors. The computation is made by dividing the total number of grade points earned at Marquette University by the total number of grade point hours earned. The official Marquette GPA of all students is calculated by the student information system and this GPA will not be rounded up or down for any reason.To graduate with honors, a candidate must be pursuing his/her first bachelor's degree, have earned at least 60 grade point hours and 60 degree hours at Marquette University, normally as a junior and senior.

A graduate whose average is 3.500 graduates cum laude (Latin for 'with honor'); one whose average is 3.700 magna cum laude (Latin for 'with great honor'); and one whose average is 3.900 summa cum laude (Latin for 'with highest honor'). Graduation honors are recorded on diplomas, noted in the published lists of graduates at Commencement and recorded on the student’s transcript.

Major Declaration

Students officially declare a major by means of the application for admission when they matriculate to the university in the Colleges of Communication, Education, Health Sciences, Nursing and Professional Studies. Students in the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration and Engineering must officially declare a major before their junior year in the college and/or academic department that offers the desired major. All students who enter the university as an undeclared major, must officially declare a major within their college and/or academic department before their junior year. All students who wish to change a major, must do so by following the procedures in place in the college they currently reside and in the college and/or academic department that offers the desired major. No major may be declared that is not in active status at the time of the declaration unless the major was active at the time of admission to the University and the student has maintained continuous enrollment at the University since admission (i.e., has not stopped out and had to be readmitted to the University, or graduated and is returning for a second degree). unless the major was active at the time of admission to the University and the student has maintained continuous enrollment at the University since admission (i.e., has not stopped out and had to be readmitted to the University, or graduated and is returning for a second degree).  Upon declaration of the major, the student normally would be required to follow the current curriculum requirements in place at the time of the declaration, rather than those in effect at the time of admission.

Minor Declaration

Students officially declare or change a minor after enrolling in the university by means of a Minor Request/Update form located on the Marquette Central academic forms website.  In order to receive appropriate advising and complete the requirements, the minor should be declared by the junior year. No minor may be declared that is not in active status at the time of the declaration and upon declaration of the minor, the student normally would be required to follow the current curriculum requirements in place at the time of the declaration, rather than those in effect at the time of admission.

Medical Withdrawal

The Medical Withdrawal policy is effective for all undergraduate and health science professional students.  The Dental School, Graduate School, Graduate School of Management and Law School have independent policies.  Marquette University students may apply for a medical withdrawal for health reasons.  A medical withdrawal is recommended when a student’s health condition significantly impairs his/her ability to function successfully or safely as a student.  The following conditions may warrant a medical withdrawal:

  • A terminal condition.
  • A traumatic victimization.
  • A medical/psychological condition that requires intensive treatment or an extended hospital stay.

Process

A student who wishes to withdraw for health related reasons must complete the Medical Withdrawal Request and Healthcare Provider Release forms located on the Marquette Central academic forms website.  This must be done by the standard withdrawal deadline published in the Academic Calendar.  In addition, a licensed healthcare provider must submit a letter substantiating the condition and supporting the withdrawal.  These forms must be submitted within the term of illness/injury.  If the student is unable to participate in the medical withdrawal process and an official medical withdrawal is needed, the student’s college office, parent, spouse, partner, or other designee may do so on behalf of the student, once the incapacitation of the student is documented or power of attorney is provided.  The university will not grant retroactive medical withdrawals of any kind for previous sessions/terms.  In addition, all previously graded courses at the time of the request will remain on the student’s record, regardless of the session/term in which the courses were taken.

A student who withdraws for medical reasons prior to the end of late registration will have no courses reflected on the academic record for the term of withdrawal.  A student who withdraws for medical reasons after the end of late registration will receive final grades of ‘W’ in all courses for the term of the withdrawal, except when courses have already been graded, or when grades of ‘ADW’ (administrative withdrawal) are warranted.  A medical withdrawal does not appear as a specific reason for withdrawal on the student’s official transcript.

The completed Medical Withdrawal Request forms are to be submitted per the instructions on the form by the student, the student’s designee, or the student’s college office, and must include all relevant documentation as described on the form.  The form and all documentation will be confidentially forwarded to the Medical Withdrawal Committee for review.  All documents must be received within 30 days of the initial request, or the request will be denied.

The Medical Withdrawal Committee is comprised of five to six members.  Permanent members include representatives from the Counseling Center, Student Health Services, the Office of Student Financial Aid, the Office of the Registrar, an undergraduate college representative from the Committee on Academic Procedures and a Health Sciences Professional representative as needed.  The Medical Withdrawal Committee reserves the right to consult with individuals from the student’s college office, as well as additional personnel, the Counseling Center, Marquette University Medical Clinic and/or Student Affairs on a case by case basis.  The Medical Withdrawal Committee will carefully review each request for medical withdrawal and determine the action to be taken, including any refund, if appropriate.  An approved medical withdrawal will exempt a student from academic censure, though a student may still be subject to review by the Office of Student Financial Aid as required by federal financial aid regulations.  It should be noted a medical withdrawal will result in a registration hold placed on the student’s record until such time he/she is cleared to return.  (See the Return to the University after Medical Withdrawal section below).

If a student’s request for an official medical withdrawal is denied, a standard term withdrawal will be initiated, and the student withdrawn from all classes with grades of ‘W’ and refund per the Office of the Bursar’s refund schedule, if applicable.  A student has the right to appeal the Medical Withdrawal Committee’s determination by writing to the Office of Student Affairs within five business days of the Committee’s decision.  The refund decision, if any, may not be appealed on its own, but will be considered as part of an appeal of the withdrawal decision.  The Office of Student Affairs will, in turn, consult with the student’s college office, or other university offices as appropriate, and reply to the student within five business days.  The determination of the Office of Student Affairs is final.

Because a medical withdrawal can affect so many aspects of academic progress at Marquette University, the student is encouraged to first consider other options that might enable the student to remain enrolled.  Each student is encouraged to consult his/her college office, the Office of Student Financial Aid, the Office of International Education and other offices as appropriate.  It is also recommended each student consult his/her health insurance company and other service providers as appropriate.

It is expected the time a student takes away from the university for a medical withdrawal be used for treatment and recovery.  To that end, a student may not return to the university the term immediately following a medical withdrawal.  A student who withdraws during the fall term may appeal for return the following summer term, or any term thereafter.  A student who withdraws during the spring term may appeal for return the following fall term, or any term thereafter.  A student who withdraws during the summer term may appeal for return the following spring term, or any term thereafter.

Return to the University after Medical Withdrawal

The Medical Withdrawal Committee must approve a student’s return to the university and the student’s college must subsequently approve readmission to the college (if applicable).  Approval to return to the university following a medical withdrawal is not guaranteed.  Because of the documentation required, and the various decisions that must be made by university officials, it is necessary that the process to return, as outlined above, begin well in advance of the session/term in which the student wishes to re-enroll.  At a minimum all required forms and documentation must be submitted no later than 30 days prior to the start of the session/term in which the student desires to return to the university.  Failure to meet the 30 day deadline may result in deferment of medical clearance and readmission.

Non-degree Students

  1. Non-degree students may register for a maximum of seven credits each term. Written authorization from the student’s dean/director must be acquired for exception to this policy. When requesting an exception, non-degree students may be required to present transcripts and other documents for evaluation.

  2. Ordinarily, non-degree students may accumulate a maximum of 24 credits at Marquette. Authorization from the student’s college dean is required before students may exceed this limit. However, twenty-four credit hours earned at Marquette University on non-degree status is the maximum that may be applied toward a degree in all disciplines with the exception of nursing, in which only 12 credit hours may be applied.
  3. Non-degree students are expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress at Marquette University. The student’s progress in these areas is monitored regularly by the office of the dean/ director. The university’s policy and procedures governing academic censure outlined in this bulletin apply to non-degree students and are exercised as necessary by the colleges.
  4. Non-degree students who wish to become degree seeking, must apply via the Undergraduate Office of Admissions and are held to all of the requirements outlined in the Admission and Readmission to the University section of this bulletin.
  5. Normally, students who are accepted and enroll with non-degree status must complete at least 12 credits before applying for degree status.
  6. A 2.000 grade point average in Marquette University course work is a minimum requirement to be considered for degree status.
  7. The university's academic regulations in this bulletin, including, but not limited to academic censure, applies to all non-degree undergraduate students.

Readmission

Readmission to Marquette University is required for any former student who wishes to return to the university to complete a first bachelor’s degree, pursue an additional bachelor’s degree or take courses for professional development. Readmission will not be considered for any former student with an outstanding balance of $3,000 or more already owed the university, or who has an active Student Affairs/Development or Office of the Registrar registration hold on his or her record.  In all cases the student must be fully readmitted to the university prior to the term/session in which he/she wishes to register (see the Academic Calendar for published deadlines).

For more information, see the complete Readmission policy in the Admission and Readmission to the Undergraduate Colleges section of this bulletin.

Registration

Normally, advising is required for all students prior to registration each term. Students who register for course work without adviser approval assume full responsibility for their registration. Courses that do not satisfy the requirements of their plans of study will not be applied toward the degree.

Students complete class online registration via Marquette's CheckMarq system. Students are responsible to ensure that their course schedule for each term/session accurately reflects the classes he/she plan to attend.  Students may not attend classes in which they are not officially registered. Students must be registered by the deadline to register for each session, as outlined in the Academic Calendar.  The university does not retroactively register students for courses after the deadline to register for a session, or after a term is completed and reserves the right to deny credit to any student who fails to officially register in any course within these time limitations. All courses for which the student is registered are subject to tuition and in some cases, additional fees. The student is responsible for any payment due for all officially registered courses, regardless of attendance.

Students who do not plan to attend the university are responsible for dropping classes through CheckMarq, before the end of registration for the session/term and notifying their respective college office. All courses for which a student is officially registered as of the close of registration are subject to fee assessment and payment, and as such will appear as part of the student’s permanent record even if the student does not attend any sessions of the class. To avoid unnecessary fee charges and unnecessary courses with punitive grades on the student’s permanent record, it is the student’s responsibility to review his/her official registration prior to the end of registration to ensure it accurately reflects the courses the student plans to be enrolled in.

A 50 percent discount on tuition (only) is available to individuals 62 years of age and older taking undergraduate and graduate courses for credit and/or audit. This opportunity is offered to students who have the proper background and prerequisite of the course(s) in question.

Registration in Graduate Courses

An undergraduate senior may register for a graduate course if the student has a B (3.000) or better average, his/her current program is such as to allow for involvement in graduate level work, and the Graduate School approves of the registration. To register for a graduate course, an undergraduate student must complete the Permission to Enroll in a Graduate Course form, available on the Graduate School forms website.  The student is responsible for securing the necessary signatures (including the dean of his/her undergraduate college or school and the course instructor), returning the completed form to the department offering the course, then registering for the course using the CheckMarq system and the permission number provided.

Undergraduate students taking graduate level courses or cross-listed (5000 numbered) courses with the intention of transferring the credits to a graduate program must be graded according to Graduate School standards. Courses may not be graded using the CR/NC, S/U, SNC/UNC or AU (audit) unless that is the only grading option available for the course.

For information on transferring credits to a Marquette graduate program see the Graduate Bulletin.

Reinstatement to the University

A student who is academically dismissed (RWAR - required to withdraw for academic reasons) at the end of a term may appeal the decision in writing to the original college or, if desired to a new college.  If the appeal is granted for the term immediately following the dismissal (or, in the case of the spring term, for the fall term), the student is not required to apply for readmission.  The student will be automatically reinstated to the university on probation status.  The official transcript will reflect both the academic dismissal and the reinstatement on probation.

A student who is academically dismissed at the end of a term and leaves the university for one or more terms must apply for readmission and, as part of the readmission application, request reinstatement to the university via the Academic Censure appeal process.  If the return to the university is approved, the official transcript will reflect both the academic dismissal and the reinstatement on probation.

Repeated Courses

Undergraduate students who repeat a course, may do so under certain conditions:

  1. Courses in which a passing grade is earned may be repeated only once.
  2. Normally, the repeated course is taken at Marquette.
  3. The repeated course is identical to the original course in subject, catalog number, title, subtitle and credits.
  4. The repeated course is graded with the same grading options as the original, e.g., students may not exercise the CR/NC option for a repeated course, unless it was originally taken with this option.
  5. The course has not been used toward the degree requirements of a Marquette degree that is already posted to the student's record.
  6. Courses in which a grade of ADW, AU, AUA, NC, W, WA, UW, U, UNC, UY or F has been earned may be repeated until a passing grade is assigned; once the passing grade has been assigned, that course may be repeated only one more time, regardless of the grade earned.
  7. A passing grade is determined as the minimum grade required by the university grading policy, in order to earn credit for a course, or considered satisfactory work.  That is D or above, CR, S, SNC or SY are passing grades at Marquette (See Grading System in this bulletin).
  8. As an exception to the regulation, these courses allow unlimited repeats: colloquiums, continuation placeholder, co-ops, independent study/research, internships, practicums/clinicals/field work experience, seminar/reading, studio/workshops, study abroad and variable title courses (e.g., topics).

Credit hours earned in a repeated course are only awarded once; however, all previous courses and grades remain on the student’s permanent academic record. The last grade earned is included in the cumulative GPA and the grade in the original course is excluded from the cumulative GPA calculation. The cumulative GPA is adjusted at the time the repeated course is graded. If a student receives an ADW, AU, AUA, W, WA or UW in the repeated course, the earlier grade will remain in the cumulative GPA. If a student repeats a course that was transferred to Marquette, only the Marquette course/grade will be reflected in the total credits earned and the cumulative GPA.

At the time of registration, the repeat process in CheckMarq will allow the repeat of a course only once, unless the course is an unlimited repeat course (see #7 above). If a student needs to repeat a course, and that repeat is allowed under the policy, he/she must petition via the Request to Repeat a Course form located on the Marquette Central academic forms website. This petition will be granted only if the request is in adherence to all the repeat criteria listed above.

Residency at Marquette

Residence is defined as the number of courses or credits a student must earn at an institution in order to be awarded a degree from that institution. Residency at Marquette for all undergraduate students, other than those admitted to the College of Professional Students is this: 1) a minimum of 60 Marquette credits are required to earn a Marquette undergraduate degree; 2) for students admitted in Summer 2010 or beyond, the final 30 credits needed to complete a Marquette undergraduate degree must be Marquette credits, unless these credits are earned in an approved study abroad program; for students admitted prior to Summer 2010, 30 of the final 36 requirements needed to complete a Marquette undergraduate degree must be Marquette credits, unless these credits are earned in an approved study abroad program; 3) a minimum of 32 upper-division Marquette credits are required to earn a Marquette undergraduate degree; 4) a minimum of 15 Marquette credits in the major are required to earn a Marquette undergraduate degree. Residency at Marquette for all undergraduate students in the College of Professional Studies is the same as above, with the exception of #1, where the minimum is 45 Marquette credits in order to earn a Marquette undergraduate degree from this college. Any exception to this policy must be approved by the Office of the Provost.

Second/Additional Bachelor Degree

Students with a baccalaureate degree who wish to further their education are strongly encouraged to consider the option of graduate school, rather than pursuing an additional baccalaureate degree.

Additional bachelor degree students who have earned a bachelor's degree at Marquette must be readmitted to the university to pursue another baccalaureate degree (See the Readmission to the University section of this bulletin).

Students who have earned their baccalaureate degree at an institution other than Marquette and wish to pursue an additional baccalaureate degree from Marquette are admitted via the Undergraduate admissions process.

Students who are currently pursuing a first bachelor's degree, may, with the written approval of the college of the student and the college offering the degree, concurrently enroll in courses that will count toward another Marquette baccalaureate degree. If approved a degree plan must be provided by the college to the Office of the Registrar. The plan must delineate clearly which courses will apply to the first degree and which apply to the second degree and all other conditions specified in the Additional Bachelor's Degree admission section of this bulletin apply.  For these students, both degrees must be posted at the same time. If the student decides to graduate with one degree before the second degree is completed, the first degree will be posted to the permanent record and then the student must readmit as a second bachelor degree student, (See the Readmission section of this bulletin.).

It is important to note that completing an additional major may or may not constitute the completion of a second degree. Consult the college that offers the degree for further clarification.

Study at Other Institutions

Students who plan to study at another institution must obtain written approval for each course prior to enrollment in the course. If prior approval is not obtained, the university reserves the right to not accept the credits earned at the other institution. Course approval forms may be obtained from the student’s college office.

Credit for courses pursued at another institution while simultaneously enrolled at Marquette (concurrent registration) will not be allowed unless specifically authorized by the dean/dean designee of the college of the student's degree.

Upon completion of the approved course work, it is the student’s responsibility to have an official transcript sent directly from the institution to the Office of the Registrar. Transcripts routed by the student will not be accepted. Transfer credits will not be reviewed or posted to the student’s Marquette academic record until the official transcript from the external institution has been recorded in the Office of the Registrar.

Transfer to another Undergraduate college within the University (Internal Transfer)

The various colleges of Marquette University operate under the jurisdiction of separate deans. Therefore, enrolled students wishing to transfer from one college to another must submit a formal Application for Internal Transfer located on the Marquette Central academic forms website.  Various criteria may be considered by the colleges during review of the student’s request to transfer colleges, including, but not limited to: current Grade Point Average, cumulative Grade Point Average, prior academic record and prior academic misconduct issues. This internal transfer decision is at the discretion of the dean/dean designee and the decision of the dean/dean designee is final. If the application for internal transfer is approved, the student will be governed by the degree requirements of the college into which the transfer is made and normally the degree requirements in effect at the time of the internal transfer. Because Marquette conducts an early registration which begins several months prior to the start of each term, it is to the student’s advantage to apply and be admitted to the transfer college as early as possible. A completed application must be submitted, as per the instructions on the form, no later than one week before the start of the session for which the student wishes to enroll. The College of Nursing has alternative deadlines.  The internal transfer deadlines are found on the Academic Calendar.

Note: A student who is academically dismissed at the end of the spring term and seeks to transfer to another college within the university for the immediate fall term, must appeal the dismissal to the new college.  For more information see the Academic Censure policy in this bulletin.

Transcripts-Official

A transcript is a complete and unabridged copy of all academic work attempted at Marquette and includes only those courses attempted at Marquette. Transfer and test credits accepted toward a Marquette degree are recorded, but the grades earned are not on the Marquette transcript and are not calculated into the Marquette GPA.  Course and grade information contained on the transcript is released only upon written consent from the student, as required by the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, or as required by law.  Further information can be found in Marquette's FERPA policy on the Marquette Central academic policies page.

The University accepts only official transcripts for the purposes of posting transfer credit or courses to the Marquette record and/or verification of a degree, diploma or certificate completion at another institution.

Official transcripts are those that are printed on security paper and come directly via U.S. Mail from another institution's record/registrar office to the Marquette Office of the Registrar (OTR) or are delivered electronically directly to the OTR via a secured third party method that has been verified by the sending institution. All other transcripts are considered unofficial and will not be accepted or processed. Once an official transcript is received by the OTR, the transcript will be submitted for review to the college office of the primary degree/major of the student for determination of those courses and/or credits that are transferable to Marquette.

The following notations will appear on the permanent academic record of the student, including the official transcripts of the University:

  1. Required to Withdraw for Academic Misconduct:  Student was dismissed due to academic dishonesty. "Required to Withdraw for Academic Misconduct" appears on both unofficial and official transcripts. If the student is allowed to return after this dismissal, "Reinstated to University" will permanently appear on both the official and unofficial transcript.
  2. Required to Withdraw for Academic Reasons:  Student was dismissed due to academic performance. "Required to Withdraw for Academic Reasons" appears on both unofficial and official transcripts. If the student is allowed to return after this dismissal, "Reinstated on College Probation" will permanently appear on both the unofficial transcript.
  3.  Required to Withdraw for Non-Academic Reasons-Expulsion:  Student was dismissed due to student conduct violation.  "Required to Withdraw for Non-Academic Reasons:  Expulsion" appears on both unofficial and official transcripts.  If the student is allowed to return after this dismissal, "Reinstated to University" will permanently appear on transcript.
  4. Required to Withdraw for Non-Academic Reasons-Suspension: Student was dismissed due to student conduct violation. "Required to Withdraw for Non-Academic Reasons: Suspension" appears on both unofficial and official transcripts. If the student is allowed to return after this dismissal, "Reinstated to University" will permanently appear on transcript.
  5.  Required to Withdraw for Professional Integrity Reasons: Student was dismissed due to lack of integrity in a professional setting, such as a clinical or field placement. "Required to Withdraw for Professional Integrity" appears on both unofficial and official transcripts. If the student is allowed to return after this dismissal, "Reinstated to University" will permanently appears on transcript.
  6. Required to Withdraw for Professional Performance Reasons: Student was dismissed due to poor performance in a professional setting, such as a clinical or field placement. "Required to Withdraw for Professional Performance" appears on both unofficial and official transcripts. If the student is allowed to return after this dismissal, "Reinstated to University" will permanently appear on transcript.
  7. Required to Withdraw for Unsatisfactory Degree Progress:  Student was dismissed due to lack of degree progress.  "Required to Withdraw for Unsatisfactory Degree Progress" appears both unofficial and official transcripts.  If the student is allowed to return after this dismissal, "Reinstated to University" will permanently appear on transcript.

Withdrawals

A student who drops his/her class(es) before the end of the last day to register for the term/session in which the class(es) is held, will have those class(es) removed from the academic record. Once the last day to register for the term/session has passed, as published in the Academic Calendar, classes will remain permanently on the record and may not be removed. That is, a student who drops his/her class(es) after this date, is withdrawing form class(es) and this withdrawal results in a permanent grade of W, except in cases where ADW, UW or WA grades are already assigned. (See Grading section of this bulletin). Students assume responsibility for the consequences that ensue as a result of any withdrawal grade. These consequences may include but are not limited to: a delay in graduation, external institutions/entities viewing these grades as a failing grades, loss of eligibility for certain scholarships and/or financial aid, loss of full-time status and/or loss of a refund.

Failure to officially withdraw from classes, or the University, according to established procedures and the withdrawal timelines, as published by the Bursar's Office, will not relieve the student of responsibility to pay for any tuition/fees owed for such classes.  In addition, the student's financial aid may be adjusted as required by federal and state refund calculations and institutional policy based on the official withdrawal date and the student's withdrawal will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse for purposes of canceling any loan deferments the student may be receiving at the time of withdrawal.  Finally, the date on which the Withdrawal form is submitted to the University will be the date used for any refund calculations.

From Classes

A student who wishes to withdraw from one or more classes, but still attend at least one other class during the term, must officially withdraw from the classes using the Undergraduate Single Course Withdrawal Form located on the Marquette Central academic forms website.  The student is not officially withdrawn from any course until the completed withdrawal form, with all the necessary signatures is submitted by the student to the office of the academic dean. Failure to officially withdraw from classes, according to the procedures withdrawal timelines, as published by the Bursar's Office, will not relieve the student of responsibility to pay for any tuition/fees owed for such classes.

A student may obtain permission to withdraw from a class, resulting in a W grade, during the period extending from the day following the end of registration for a particular session, until the date specified in the Academic Calendar; however, if a ADW, UW or WA grade has already been assigned by the college office it will remain on the record permanently (see Grading section of this bulletin). After this deadline, a student will no longer be given permission to withdraw from classes except for serious non-academic reasons (e.g., injury, family crisis).

It is the student’s responsibility to determine, prior to the withdrawal, if there will be financial aid and/or scholarship consequences, should the withdrawal from classes result in the student’s status changing from full-time or part-time. The date on which the withdrawal form is submitted to the University will be the date used for refund calculation.

If a student, at any time, fails to manifest those qualities judged to be appropriate and necessary to the professional field for which he or she is preparing, withdrawal from the program may be initiated by the college and grades of ADW will be assigned if the administrative withdrawal action is taken during the term.

From the University

A student who is enrolled for one or more classes and decides to withdraw from all of them in a given term (even if enrolled in just one class), or decides to discontinue his/her study at Marquette after a term is complete, must formally withdraw from the university. Withdrawal is accomplished via the Withdrawal for All Students form or the official Medical Withdrawal process.  All forms for these withdrawals are located on the Marquette Central academic forms website.

After obtaining the official Withdrawal form, a student who wishes to withdraw from the university needs to follow all of the instructions on the appropriate form, including the submission of any supporting documents and any additional required signatures.

A complete term withdrawal will not be processed by the university or considered official until the completed withdrawal form, with all necessary signatures is submitted by the student to the college office; however, if a ADW, UW or WA grade has already been assigned by the college office in all classes, it will not be replaced with the W grade.

If a student withdraws from the university during the term, without the permission of the dean, he/she will receive the appropriate withdrawal grade by the faculty or the college dean in each course. These grades will be reviewed as part of the readmission process, should the student wish to return to the university in the future.

The only exception permitted to the policies and procedures described above applies to students who have classes only in the evening (after 4:30 p.m.), or those who are unable to meet with the college office due to extenuating circumstances, such as hospitalization. Such students do not have to physically appear at the academic dean’s office; written notification of intent to the college dean’s office constitutes acceptable means of compliance with university policy and procedure.

If registered, failure to officially withdraw from classes, according to the procedures and withdrawal timelines, as published by the Bursar’s Office, will not relieve the student of responsibility to pay for any tuition/fees owed for such classes.  In addition, the student’s financial aid will then be adjusted as by federal and state refund calculations and institutional policy based on this date and the student’s unofficial withdrawal date will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse for purposes of canceling any loan deferments the student may be receiving at the time of withdrawal. Finally, the University will use this date to calculate refunds, if any are due.

In cases of administrative withdrawal, the student must be readmitted to the university and be cleared by the academic dean and/or the dean of students before the readmission request will be processed.

Unofficial

Students who register, but fail to officially withdraw from classes, will be withdrawn by the college office once informed of the non-attendance. This action results in a permanent grade of UW on the academic record. The date that the college office first learns of the non-attendance will be the date used by the University to calculate all necessary actions. Failure to officially withdraw from classes, according to the procedures and withdrawal timelines, as published by the Bursar’s Office, will not relieve the student of responsibility to pay for any tuition/fees owed for such classes.  In addition, the student’s financial aid will then be adjusted as by federal and state refund calculations and institutional policy based on this date and the student’s unofficial withdrawal date will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse for purposes of canceling any loan deferments the student may be receiving at the time of withdrawal. Finally, the University will use this date to calculate refunds, if any are due.

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