Prospective StudentsCurrent StudentsAlumniParentsFaculty & StaffMedia
AdmissionsProgramsAboutResearch & ScholarshipAthleticsCareersGiving to Marquette
Marquette Central


Bulletin Home | A-Z Directory | Previous Bulletins | PDF Version PDF Version



Chairperson: Susan K. Wood, SCL, Ph.D.
marquette.edu/theology/graduate.shtml

Degrees Offered

Theology

Master of Arts in Christian Doctrine (M.A.C.D.)

Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.), students are admitted under Plan B (non-thesis option) but Plan A (thesis option) is also offered

Religious Studies

Doctor of Philosophy

Specializations

M.A.C.D.: None

M.A.: Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity, Historical Theology, Systematic Theology/Theological Ethics

Ph.D.: Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity, Historical Theology, Systematic Theology, Theological Ethics, Theology and Society (includes Healthcare Mission and Ethics)

Program Descriptions

The Theology Department offers master's and doctoral programs aimed at giving students an integrated approach to theological studies, emphasizing, within theological specialties, the interaction of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, historical, systematic and ethical approaches to theology. The programs seek to develop scholars who can make significant contributions to theological research and writing and college and high school teachers who can teach a broad range of courses. This broad theological background has enabled program graduates to enjoy enviable success in securing teaching positions in over 200 colleges and universities, in church work and ministry and in a variety of other educationally related institutions.

The master of arts in Christian doctrine (M.A.C.D.) focuses on an ecumenical appropriation and communication of Christian doctrine for those teaching in Catholic high schools, for those interested in other religious education or formation programs and for persons interested in theological enrichment or in serving various other needs in religious communities.

The master of arts in theology (M.A.) is intended primarily, but not exclusively, for those who intend to pursue a doctoral degree in theology or religious studies. The degree provides professional competence in the field of theological studies.

The doctor of philosophy in religious studies (Ph.D.) is a terminal academic degree producing professional specialists in one of the following areas: Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, historical theology, systematics and theological ethics. The degree provides supporting competence in the other areas as well.

Prerequisites for Admission

Master of arts in Christian doctrine (M.A.C.D.) applicants should have an undergraduate degree with a major in theology (religion, religious studies) or some other appropriate background. Students should have some familiarity with Scripture and basic Christian doctrines. Opportunities to make up undergraduate deficiencies are available.

Master of arts in theology (M.A.) applicants should have an undergraduate major in theology (religion, religious studies) or other background (e.g., classics, philosophy) appropriate for graduate study in theology. A minor in philosophy is recommended for those planning to study systematic theology. Ideally, all applicants should have some familiarity with Scripture and basic Christian doctrine. The program offers ample opportunities for making up undergraduate deficiencies.

Doctorate in religious studies (Ph.D.) applicants should have a master's degree or its equivalent in theology.

Application Deadlines

No official deadline exists for the master of arts in Christian doctrine (M.A.C.D.). Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis, and admitted students may begin their program in summer, fall or spring.

Master of arts (M.A.) application files must be complete by Dec. 15, including all supporting documents, for fall admission and financial aid consideration. Applicants not competing for financial aid may apply up to May 15. Master of arts students may only begin their program in fall or summer.

Doctoral (Ph.D.) application files must be complete by Dec. 15, including all supporting documents, for fall admission and financial aid consideration. Applicants will be notified of Marquette's admission decision by March 31. Doctoral students may only begin their program in fall.

Application Requirements

Applicants to all graduate programs in the Department of Theology must submit an online application directly to the Graduate School via the link found at marquette.edu/grad.

Applicants to the M.A. and M.A.C.D. programs must submit the following materials:

  1. A completed application form and fee.
  2. Complete, official undergraduate and graduate transcripts from all current and previous colleges/universities except Marquette, sent by issuing institutions directly to the Graduate School.
  3. Results of the Graduate Record Examination (General Test only).
  4. A brief statement of purpose that includes: reasons for wanting to enter the program, vocational objectives, special areas of interest, and reasons for selecting Marquette's program.
  5. Three letters of recommendation.
  6. (For applicants without an undergraduate degree in theology) a list of all college work in theology - course work, level and instructor, even though some of this also appears on official transcripts submitted.
  7. (For international applicants only) a TOEFL score or other acceptable proof of English proficiency.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program should submit the following materials:

  1. A completed online application form and application fee.
  2. Complete, official undergraduate and graduate transcripts from all current and previous colleges/universities except Marquette, sent by issuing institutions directly to the Marquette Graduate School.
  3. Results of the Graduate Record Examination (General Test only).
  4. A brief statement of purpose that includes: reasons for wanting to enter the program, vocational objectives, special areas of interest, and reasons for selecting Marquette's program.
  5. Three letters of recommendation. (Note: For applicants who are current Marquette students, and who plan to stay at Marquette for the doctorate, three new letters of recommendation are required.)
  6. A statement of language proficiency: a list of formal course work, especially graduate reading courses, indicating when and where taken and grade earned; a description of private study, indicating when and where undertaken; and an estimate of present facility in reading, writing and speaking.
  7. An academic writing sample of not more than 20 pages.
  8. (For international applicants only) a TOEFL score or other acceptable proof of English proficiency.

Master of Arts in Christine Doctrine (M.A.C.D.) Requirements

The M.A.C.D. degree requires 30 credit hours of course work. Up to 9 credit hours of 5000-level courses are acceptable for graduate credit if additional readings and writing assignments are arranged with the respective professor and completed satisfactorily. After successfully completing all course work, students will be required to write a comprehensive paper that integrates what they have learned in their courses and applies what they have learned to their career goals. M.A.C.D. candidates have no foreign language requirements. The M.A.C.D. is intended to be a terminal degree.

Core Courses and Electives

Of the 30 total credit hours of course work, 21 credit hours must be taken from the core courses:

THEO 6110Old Testament Method3
THEO 6120New Testament Method3
THEO 6210Origen to Late Medieval3
THEO 6220Late Medieval to Early Modern3
THEO 6320Christian Doctrine 13
THEO 6321Christian Doctrine 23
THEO 6410Introduction to Theological Ethics3
Total Credit Hours21

In certain circumstances and in consultation with a student's academic adviser, equivalent courses may be taken.

For the 9 credit hours of electives (three courses), the student must choose one course in each of the principal theological disciplines: Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, historical and systematics/ethics. In certain circumstances, and with the permission of the M.A.C.D. program adviser, the elective courses can be chosen from the following course ranges.

One from any of the following Judaism and Christianity in antiquity courses: THEO 5000 Digging the Bible: Archeology and Biblical Studies to THEO 5190 Studies in Biblical Theology;

One from any of the following historical courses: THEO 5200 Theology in the Early Church to THEO 5290 Studies in Historical Theology; and

One from any of the following systematics/ethics courses: THEO 5300 Contemporary Atheism and Theism to THEO 5540 Hinduism, Yoga, and Buddhism.

Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.) Requirements

A master's student must complete 30 credit hours of course work, submit an approved research project, fulfill the department's foreign language requirement and pass a comprehensive examination.

Core Courses and Electives

Master's students may pursue either a Plan A or Plan B course of study. The student is assumed to be in Plan B unless a formal request to transfer to Plan A is approved by the department chairperson and the Graduate School.

The course work requirement for Plan A consists of 18 credit hours of core courses, six credit hours of electives, and six credit hours of work on the research project. Course work for Plan B consists of 18 credit hours of core courses and 12 credit hours of electives, in addition to completing a non-credit research project.

Master's students in both Plans A and B must take 18 credit hours of required core courses:

THEO 6110Old Testament Method3
THEO 6120New Testament Method3
THEO 6210Origen to Late Medieval3
THEO 6220Late Medieval to Early Modern3
THEO 6310Introduction to Systematic Theology3
THEO 6410Introduction to Theological Ethics3
Total Credit Hours18

In consultation with an adviser, and not later than the end of the first year of study, each student will choose a specialization (Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, historical or systematics/ethics). A student in Plan A must complete three credit hours of elective course work in each of the areas not chosen for specialization and six credit hours of work on a research project in the area of specialization. A student in Plan B must complete six credit hours of elective course work in the area of specialization and three credit hours in each of the other two areas.

Foreign Language Requirements

All students in the master of arts program in theology are required to pass a competency examination in German, French or another modern foreign language recognized as essential to the student's research.

M.A. Comprehensive Examination

After all other requirements have been met, the comprehensive examination is administered by the Master of Arts Examination Committee. The exam is offered in April, July, and November. The examination is in three parts, each of which has two sections.

  1. Judaism and Christianity in Antiquity: Old Testament, New Testament
  2. Historical: Origin to Late Medieval, Late Medieval to Early Modern
  3. Systematics and Theological Ethics

The three parts, each two hours in duration, are taken at the same examination session. Each part of the comprehensive examination consists of six questions, from which the student must answer three, including at least one from each section. All questions are based on the current master's bibliography and questions. The bibliography and questions are available through the departmental website at marquette.edu/theology/theologygraduateformsanddocuments.shtml. Additional information may be found in the department's Procedures and Policies handbook.

Doctor of Philosophy in Religious Studies Requirements

All students entering the doctoral program are required to take the master's proficiency exam, a minimum of 60 credit hours of graduate theology course work, plus 12 credit hours of dissertation work, fulfill the department's foreign language requirement, pass qualifying examinations, and submit and successfully defend a dissertation.

M.A. Proficiency Examination

All students entering the doctoral program are required to take the master's proficiency examination (equivalent to the master's comprehensive examination described in the M.A. section above) approximately one week before beginning their program. Passing the examination demonstrates a broad, master's level proficiency - the equivalent of material covered in Marquette's core courses - in each of the three major theological disciplines: Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, historical theology and systematics/ethics. The examination helps students and advisers to identify those areas which require additional preparation before beginning doctoral-level course work. This is in keeping with the character of the Marquette doctoral program in which specialization builds upon a sound knowledge of the history of the theological tradition. The bibliography and questions for the exam are available through the departmental website at marquette.edu/theology/theologygraduateformsanddocuments.shtml. Additional information may be found in the department's Procedures and Policies handbook. Any student who does not demonstrate proficiency in one or more of the sections on the examination, or after a second examination during the first term, is required to take the related master's level course. These courses do not count toward the final 60 hours required for doctoral-level course work.

Core Courses and Electives

The doctoral program in religious studies offers six areas of specialization. The doctoral qualifying examination (DQE) will emphasize the student's chosen area of specialization. A student specializing in Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, historical theology, systematic theology or theological ethics must complete 36 credit hours of course work in the area of specialization and approximately 12 credit hours of course work in each of the other two areas.

A student in the theology and society specialization must complete at least 30 credit hours of theology course work (primarily in one area of specialization: Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, historical or systematics/ethics) selected around the theology and society theme, at least 9 credit hours in each of the two other areas of theology (at least 18 total), and 12 credit hours in one or more human sciences (economics, education, English, history, philosophy, political science, psychology) related to the theology and society theme. Students pursuing the healthcare mission and ethics track within the theology and society specialization must complete the 12 credit hours in healthcare related courses (such as: NURS 6007 Ethics, Policy, and Health Care Advocacy, NURS 6009 Organizational and Systems Leadership, HEAL 6841 Health Care Finance, HEAL 6846 Health Care Informatics, HEAL 6848 Health Care Policy, LAW 7156 Current Issues in Health Law, LAW 7181 Elder Law and LAW 7221 Health Law). Students in this track may be required to take additional course work, beyond the 60-credit-hour requirement, to certify their qualifications in both theology and the allied discipline. Qualifying examinations and dissertation topics for doctoral students in the theology and society specialization are expected to reflect the cross-disciplinary nature of the course work.

All doctoral students must complete an approved Doctoral Program Planning Form by the end of their first year of course work.

Doctoral Qualifying Examination (DQE)

This examination may be taken once the the student has fulfilled the language requirement and is in the final semester of course work. The student obtains a copy of the area topics from the Department of Theology Web page and then, working with his or her adviser, chooses three topics in the major area and one in each of the two minor areas for presentation in the examination. (Responsibility for preparing the lists of topics rests with the faculties of the separate areas of concentration with the approval of the Graduate Committee.) The student submits the application form with tentative examination dates, the list of topics and the names of eight regular faculty members who have agreed to serve on the board (including normally, that of the adviser) to the Graduate Committee. The student also submits a list of all graduate courses in theology, according to areas, whether taken at Marquette University or elsewhere. The Graduate Committee then approves an examination board of five members, three from the student's major area and one from each of the two minor areas and approves a chair for this board. The chair is normally a faculty member in the student's major area; the student's adviser may not serve as chair.

Once the Graduate Committee's approval is obtained, the student registers at least one month before the qualifying examination with the assistant to the chair for the examination. There are no scheduled dates for qualifying examinations in the department. A student is free to register for any date falling on a regular class day between Sept. 1 and May 10. Once a student registers, this date should not be changed except for serious reasons and with the approval of the departmental chair. Soon after the DQE has been registered with the assistant to the chair, the chair of the exam informs members of the board about the day on which the DQE questions are due to the assistant to the chair. The chair of the examination board is responsible, in consultation with the other members of the board, for preparing two questions for each of the four sections of the written examination.

The student has three hours in which to answer each of the questions given. The oral examination lasts approximately ninety minutes, unless the chair of the qualifying board wishes to extend this period. The examiners are free to question the student about the examination responses, the questions given in the written portion of the examination or any other aspects of the topic areas originally chosen by the student. Each examiner, after consultation with the other members of the board if he or she so wishes, provides the chair of the qualifying board with a written evaluation of the student's performance in both the written and oral parts of the examination. The qualifying board chair then submits these reports and his/her own chair's report to the departmental chair for a signature and forwarding to the Graduate School. While the board will normally give unofficial notification of the results of the examination immediately after the oral portion, the Graduate School will officially notify the student of the results after one or two weeks. A student needs four out of five 'satisfactory' judgments to pass.

To summarize the process:

The student obtains a copy of the topic areas and the application form.

In consultation with the adviser, the student selects three (3) topics in the major area and one (1) topic in each of the minor areas. The topic areas on the application form must match exactly with those on the topics list.

The student solicits three (3) faculty members in the major topic area and one (1) in each of the minor areas to serve as the examining board. Three (3) alternate faculty names must be provided. Note: The student's adviser may be on the DQE board but may not serve as the chair.

The student prepares the DQE application form and a list of courses that the student has taken both at Marquette and in the previous graduate institution. These are submitted to the Graduate Committee. Student and adviser are notified when the examination topics and board have been approved by the Graduate Committee and an exam registration form is provided.

The faculty member who chairs the DQE board is responsible for 1) contacting the other members of the examination board to solicit the examination questions, 2) arranging with the other members of the board the time of the oral examination, 3) communicating the time and place of the examination to the student and 4) preparing the examination questions. (The assistant to the chair schedules the exam on the departmental calendar.)

Faculty members who participate in DQE boards should clarify their expectations with the student. These include, at least, the list of required materials for preparation and the number of conversations the faculty member expects to have with the student prior to the examination.

Foreign Language Requirements

All doctoral students are required to pass a competency examination in two modern foreign languages (normally German and French; another language essential for the student's research may be substituted for one of these two in consultation with the student's adviser). Students with a master's degree from an institution other than Marquette must pass their first foreign language examination by the end of their first year in the program. Students must pass both German and French or other accepted modern language by the end of their second year in the program. Students must pass all language requirements prior to sitting for their doctoral qualifying examinations.

Language competency examinations are administered, for a fee, by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, which also offers courses in preparation for the examination.

Students who specialize in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible studies must also pass examinations in Hebrew at the advanced level and Greek at the intermediate level of competence. Students who specialize in New Testament studies must also pass examinations in Greek at the advanced level and Hebrew at the intermediate level of competence. Students in historical theology and in systematics/ethics within the Western theological traditions must also pass a competency examination in Latin; those studying within other theological traditions must pass a competency examination in Latin, Greek or another ancient language recognized as essential to the student's research. Students in systematic theology and theological ethics must also pass a competency examination in Latin. Students in the theology and society track have no additional language requirements beyond the two modern foreign languages (normally German and French; another language essential for the student's research may be substituted for one of these two in consultation with the student's adviser). Students in the healthcare mission and ethics track are required to pass competency examinations in Latin and one other modern language (normally German or French; another language essential for the student's research may be substituted for one of these two in consultation with the student's adviser).

Doctoral Dissertation

The student chooses a topic that falls within the scope of the department's understanding of religious studies and for which the student can locate a member of the department faculty with the competence and interest necessary for being the director. The student is encouraged to identify a topic and an available director toward the end of course work or while preparing for the qualifying examination. A dissertation outline may not be submitted to the Graduate School, however, until the qualifying examination has been completed. Once the student and the director are in agreement on the dissertation proposal, the student fills out the Doctoral Dissertation Outline. The student submits this (unsigned) outline to the Graduate Committee, with a cover letter from the director indicating his/her willingness to serve as director, together with the proposal of at least six names, exclusive of the director's, of the full-time faculty of the department (who have also indicated their willingness to serve) for consideration as nominees to the four-person dissertation board. Outside the theology and society program, the members of a doctoral dissertation committee should be full-time members of the Theology Department unless a special request is made and approved. The departmental chair, after consultation with the departmental Graduate Committee, then nominates a board and notifies the director to convene a meeting within six weeks with the proposed board and the student to secure in writing the board's approval of the outline or their suggested revisions. Once the board has approved the outline, it is returned to the departmental chair for a signature. It is then sent to the Graduate School. In consultation with other members of the board, the student then completes the dissertation to the satisfaction of the director.

Dissertation Defense

Once the director judges that the dissertation is ready for a public defense, and at least one month prior to the date of the defense and two months prior to the Graduate School deadline for submitting final copies of the dissertation (this is more time than the Graduate School requires), the assistant to the chair distributes the defense copies of the dissertation to the members of the board. Board members have at least one month in which to read the dissertation by the last day of which they must inform the director whether they agree that the dissertation is ready for defense. If one or more members of the board determine that the dissertation is not ready for defense, the director, after informing the student of the situation, may reschedule it. Board members should feel free to communicate additional criticisms of the dissertation to the director before the defense. After the board members have read the dissertation, the final public defense is held. The date of the defense must be at least one month prior to the Graduate School deadline for submitting final copies of the dissertation (again, more time than the Graduate School requires). Furthermore, at least one month prior to the defense date the student must submit to the assistant to the chair an abstract (no longer than 350 words) and the announcement of public defense form. An electronic copy of the abstract should be emailed to the Graduate School. Additional copies of the program are made available to those attending the public defense. The entire board is present for the defense, with the dissertation director as chair. The candidate presents a brief summary of the work done. All the readers offer comments and question the student. Finally, the director offers comments and questions the student. Comments and questions from the floor may be invited by the director.

After the defense the student has at least three weeks to correct and revise the dissertation in light of the written and oral criticisms received. The final dissertation is submitted electronically to the Graduate School. Detailed instructions for electronic dissertation submission are available on the Graduate School's Web page.

The following items are not part of the electronic submission, but they are still due in the Graduate School by the dissertation deadline. They will be collected/provided by the Department of Theology.

  1. One paper copy of the signature page.
  2. Dissertation Committee Approval form.
  3. One hard copy of the dissertation for the Department of Theology library. (Your dissertation director may also ask you to provide a copy of the dissertation for his/her personal library.)

Courses

THEO 5000. Digging the Bible: Archeology and Biblical Studies. 3 cr. hrs.

An exploration of the uses and abuses of archeology relative to the field of biblical studies. Case studies in a historical approach to the intersection of archeology and biblical theology.

THEO 5010. The Bible in Its Interpretive Communities. 3 cr. hrs.

The ways in which the Bible was produced, and the ways in which it has been and is currently being used in various communities.

THEO 5020. The Bible in the Jewish Community. 3 cr. hrs.

The uses of the Bible in Jewish life and practice, in synagogue and in private use. Haggadah and Halakah.

THEO 5030. Women in the Bible. 3 cr. hrs.

Status and roles of women in selected biblical texts. Social and historical background with emphasis on narrative technique and theological themes.

THEO 5190. Studies in Biblical Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant topics in Old Testament, Intertestamental, or New Testament literature.

THEO 5200. Theology in the Early Church. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the era of the Church Fathers.

THEO 5210. History and Theology of the Christian East. 3 cr. hrs.

The Christian East from its origins, through the conversion of Constantine, to the present-day Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Churches. Particular attention to the distinctive theological emphases of the East, as well as to the developments leading to the break in communion between Catholic (and Protestant) West and Orthodox East.

THEO 5220. St. Augustine: The Man and the Theologian. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of Augustine's life, writings and thought, with special attention to the Confessions, to his theology of the church and the sacraments, and to his teaching on grace and predestination, against the background of his early philosophical writings.

THEO 5230. Theology in the Middle Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the Middle Ages, from the Carolingians to the 14th century.

THEO 5240. Theology in the Reformation Era. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments during the late Middle Ages and early Reformation. Also addresses current ecumenical issues.

THEO 5250. Martin Luther. 3 cr. hrs.

The thought and world of Luther, with emphasis on Luther in his Catholic context; Luther and the Bible, Augustine, the Radicals, the Pope; Luther's theology of faith and freedom; contextual, theological and ethical.

THEO 5260. Theology in America. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic theological questions and developments from Puritanism to the present.

THEO 5270. American Catholic Life and Thought. 3 cr. hrs.

Analyzes the development of American Catholic life and thought from the colonial establishment to the present. Investigates in particular how clergymen, theologians, and laypersons came to terms with the difficulties and benefits of being Catholic in the United States.

THEO 5290. Studies in Historical Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant figures and themes in the history of religious thought, examined in their historical context and contemporary significance. Topics and periods vary.

THEO 5300. Contemporary Atheism and Theism. 3 cr. hrs.

Origins and varieties of contemporary atheism. The existence of God and Christian theistic interpretations.

THEO 5310. Theology of the Holy Spirit. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the distinct mission and person of the Holy Spirit in the Trinitarian work of human salvation. Analysis of biblical, patristic, and conciliar sources; attention to modern theology and the role of experience.

THEO 5320. Jesus the Christ. 3 cr. hrs.

The identity of Jesus Christ and the nature of Christian salvation as attested to in the New Testament and Christian tradition. Historical Jesus and diversity of Christologies in the New Testament. Humanity and divinity of Christ. The saving significance of Christ's life, death, and resurrection.

THEO 5330. Theology of the Church. 3 cr. hrs.

The Church in light of the documents, events, and charism of Vatican II. Contemporary understandings of the Church and its mission in the modern world. Special attention to post-conciliar "communion ecclesiology" and the relation of the local to the universal Church.

THEO 5340. Sacraments and Christian Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological overview of the major sacramental enactments of the church's life in Christ. The witness of Scripture and Tradition, including the liturgy itself. Ethical and ecumenical dimensions.

THEO 5350. The Eucharist. 3 cr. hrs.

Biblical origins and historical evolution of the Eucharist in light of contemporary theology and ritual theory, with special focus on the Roman Rite Catholic post-Vatican II celebration.

THEO 5360. Christian Prayer and Mysticism. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to some of the main currents in the Christian tradition of prayer and mysticism. Origins in Scripture and the early church. Main lines of development in both Eastern and Western traditions, with a focus on the Catholic tradition.

THEO 5370. Protestant Thought and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Major perspectives within the broad spectrum of Protestantism. Examination of the thought of several Protestant theologians. A survey of the unity and diversity of several Protestant denominations and their respective forms of worship.

THEO 5390. Studies in Systematic Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Significant movements and/or major figures in contemporary systematic theology. Their historical antecedents and cultural context. Specific topics to be specified in the Schedule of Classes.

THEO 5400. Christian Faith and Justice. 3 cr. hrs.

Classic and recent Christian understandings of justice as interpersonal and societal right-relations. Justice as constitutive aspect of the Gospel; love and justice; Christian responsibility in the face of injustice. Further issues, e.g. sexual and gender ethics, political and economic issues.

THEO 5405. Christian Theology in Global Contexts. 3 cr. hrs.

The reception of the Christian gospel in diverse cultures throughout the world. The challenge of inculturation and the requirements of the unity of Christian faith. The meaning of mission and evangelization outside the West. The encounter with indigenous religions.

THEO 5410. Family, Church, and Society. 3 cr. hrs.

The interaction of family, church, and society. Contemporary family patterns, their strengths and stresses; the teachings, reflection, and pastoral responses of the Church concerning marriage and family. Ecclesial and societal implications of family as "domestic church.".

THEO 5420. Theology, Violence, and Nonviolence. 3 cr. hrs.

Non-violence as a creative solution to human oppression and violence. The relationship between non-violence and the lifestyle of such figures as Jesus, Gandhi, King. The implications of non-violence for social, political and cultural life.

THEO 5430. Theology and the Natural Sciences. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological analysis of the historical relationship between religion and the natural sciences; exploration of models for relating the two disciplines today; reflection on the theological implications of contemporary scientific discoveries and theories.

THEO 5440. Foundations of Ecological Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of religious foundations for ecological ethics, with a focus on the Catholic tradition and social teachings; application to contemporary ecological problems.

THEO 5450. Medical Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Health care practices under moral assessment from within the Christian tradition. Controversial topics facing medicine (issues of the beginning and end of life, assisted reproduction, etc.) as related to Christian moral principles.

THEO 5490. Studies in Moral Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Selected issues in contemporary moral life; selected themes from classical and contemporary writings in moral theology and Christian ethics. Topics vary, as specified in the Schedule of Classes.

THEO 5500. Christ and World Religions: Theology of Interreligious Dialogue. 3 cr. hrs.

Global pluralism of religions considered from perspectives of Christian faith. Methods and case studies of theological dialogue with particular religious traditions, e.g. Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism.

THEO 5510. Survey of World Religions. 3 cr. hrs.

An overview of the major religious traditions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, religions of China and Japan, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

THEO 5520. Jewish Thought and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Meaning of Jewish history. Philosophical and social understanding of the Jewish experience. Ruling ideas, myths, symbols, and rites. Partially funded by the Jewish Chautauqua Society.

THEO 5530. Islam: Faith and Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Major trends of Islamic religious thought, practice, and worship. Readings from the Qur'an and other Islamic writings. Historical approach. Current issues and developments. Islam in the West.

THEO 5540. Hinduism, Yoga, and Buddhism. 3 cr. hrs.

Religious experience, cultic act, religious organization, theological formulation, as illustrated by two religions of India, Hinduism and Buddhism. Yoga as spiritual discipline. Historical approach. Readings from sacred writings.

THEO 6110. Old Testament Method. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel. History and methods of interpretation. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 6120. New Testament Method. 3 cr. hrs.

Background, geography, text, language, versions, editions. Principal problems in individual books. Exegetical techniques. Hermeneutical principles. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 6130. The Gospels. 3 cr. hrs.

Formation, structure, and styles of the four canonical Gospels. Topics to be studied include: their sources, literary relationships, depictions of Jesus, role of the Church, discipleship, and suffering. Each Gospel will be studied in terms of the communities that produced them and their relationship to other texts. Exegesis of selected texts.

THEO 6210. Origen to Late Medieval. 3 cr. hrs.

A brief introduction to historiography and historical method with a more focused introduction to major theological issues and debates (e.g., scripture and tradition; trinity; Christology; grace and sacraments; faith and reason; church and state) and to some of the key contributions of major eastern and western theologians (e.g., Origen, Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, John of Damascus, Anselm, Abelard, Gregory Palamas, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus). Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; required for all master's candidates.

THEO 6220. Late Medieval to Early Modern. 3 cr. hrs.

A basic introduction to theological developments from 1350 to the end of the Enlightenment (1800). Examines major theological movements and the thought of major thinkers (e.g., Ockham, Biel, Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Bellarmine, Bossuet, Pascal, Spener, Edwards, Lessing, Kant) within their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; required for all master's candidates.

THEO 6310. Introduction to Systematic Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Relation of systematic theology to faith, revelation (the Bible, Church creeds and doctrines), and the Church. The role of biblical exegesis, historical scholarship, philosophy, natural and human sciences in systematic theology. Derivation of various categories, subdivisions, and methods of systematic theology. The challenges and prospects of interconfessional and interreligious dialogue for systematic theology. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 6320. Christian Doctrine 1. 3 cr. hrs.

A historical and theological introduction to the formation and development of the Christian doctrines of the Trinity, Christology, and Pneumatology. Focuses on the interrelationships of these doctrines. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 6321. Christian Doctrine 2. 3 cr. hrs.

A historical and theological introduction to the Christian doctrines of Church, sacraments, and eschatology. Focuses on the interrelationships of these doctrines with one another and with those in Christian Doctrine 1. Prereq: THEO 6320 and cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 6410. Introduction to Theological Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Systematic survey of the fundamental categories, concepts and norms used in moral theology to analyze human moral experience. The role of Scripture and tradition as foundational sources in moral theology. The church as the locus for Christian moral reflection. Pivotal issues in the historical development of moral theology. The relation of moral philosophy to moral theology. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; required for master's core curriculum.

THEO 6415. Catholic Social Encyclical Tradition. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the following principles of Catholic Social teaching: the dignity of persons in community and the common good; the duties of the state and the principle of subsidiarity; kinds of justice and their application in social, political and economic life; the relationship between labor and capital; Church-state relationships; war and peace; and environmental stewardship. The issues are traced through the documents of Vatican II and selected Apostolic Exhortations. Prereq: Cons. of dept.

THEO 6995. Independent Study in Theology. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 6998. Professional Project in Theology. 0 cr. hrs.

SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 6999. Master's Thesis. 1-6 cr. hrs.

S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8010. Intensive Hebrew Grammar. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar, verb syntax, and vocabulary acquisition. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8011. Advanced Hebrew. 3 cr. hrs.

Reading of selected narrative and poetic books. Advanced grammar. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8012. Aramaic Dialects. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides the student who already has a background in Biblical Hebrew with a survey of Aramaic dialects, ranging from Ancient Aramaic to Syriac. Includes biblical Aramaic and Qumran Aramaic. Emphasis on providing the student with the tools to use these dialects in other biblical courses. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8120. Sources of Pentateuchal Thought. 3 cr. hrs.

Detailed study of the first five books of the Old Testament. Exegesis of selected passages. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8121. Prophetic Books of Ancient Israel. 3 cr. hrs.

Key themes in the prophetic movement. Relation of the prophets to the cult, society, and history of ancient Israel. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8122. Psalms and Religion of Ancient Israel. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the literary, theological, and historical dimensions of the book of Psalms. Relationship between the psalms and cultic life. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8123. Former Prophets: Historical Books. 3 cr. hrs.

Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. The structure, sources, narrative technique, and theology of the Deuteronomistic corpus. Hebrew text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8124. Wisdom Books of Ancient Israel. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the place of Wisdom Literature in the development of Hebrew thought. Exegesis of selected passages. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8125. Intertestamental Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the books of the Old Testament Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha. Other developments of the period. Exegesis of selected passages. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8126. Judaism in the Hellenistic Era. 3 cr. hrs.

Jewish history, institutions, movements, and writings of this period, including Qumran, as they pertain to biblical studies. Jewish interpretation of scripture; midrash; haggadah and halakah; targums; Hellenistic influences on Judaism in Palestine and the diaspora; other related topics. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8127. The Writings. 3 cr. hrs.

An investigation into some of the other books of the Hebrew Bible beyond Torah and Prophets. May include literary, theological, and historical elements of "The Five Scrolls," Daniel, Ezra-Nehemiah, I and II Chronicles. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8150. Special Questions in Old Testament Studies:. 3 cr. hrs.

Specialized research on topics or problems within and/or related to the Old Testament writings. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8210. Intensive Hellenistic Greek Grammar. 3 cr. hrs.

An introduction to the Greek of the Hellenistic era, including the New Testament. Emphasis on grammar, syntax, vocabulary acquisition and historical context and theology. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8211. Advanced Hellenistic Greek. 3 cr. hrs.

Advanced grammar; readings in texts from 300 B.C. to 300 A.D. Emphasis on the language of the New Testament as reflective of continuity and change in Greek vocabulary, morphology, syntax, style, and the historical context and theology of these texts. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8310. Hellenistic Backgrounds to the New Testament. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduction to various Graeco-Roman issues and movements which influenced the development of New Testament writings. Study of traditional religion, mystery cults, philosophical schools, astrology and magic, literary genres and tendencies, and other related topics. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8311. Apocalyptic Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

Origin and development of prophetic and apocalyptic eschatology. The social and religious phenomenon of apocalypticism. The genre "apocalypse" in Jewish and early Christian tradition. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8312. Formation of the Gospel Tradition. 3 cr. hrs.

Literary interrelationship of the four Gospels. Theories of Gospel priority and dependence. Development of oral and written traditions. Distinctive character of the Gospel form. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8313. Matthew. 3 cr. hrs.

Formation, structure, and style of the Gospel of Matthew. Redactional and literary analysis of the Gospel to reconstruct the theology and the situation which produced it. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8314. Mark. 3 cr. hrs.

Formation, structure, and style of the Gospel of Mark. Redactional and literary analysis of the Gospel to reconstruct the theology and the situation which produced it. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8315. Luke-Acts. 3 cr. hrs.

Formation, structure, and style of Luke-Acts. Redactional and literary analysis of these two volumes to reconstruct the theology and the situation which produced them. Questions of Christian origins. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8316. The Johannine Tradition. 3 cr. hrs.

Formation, structure, and style of the Gospel of John. Source, redaction, and literary analysis to reconstruct the stages of formation and their corresponding theologies. Relation of the Johannine letters to the Gospel. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8317. Letter to the Romans. 3 cr. hrs.

Background and purpose of this letter. Examination of important Pauline themes, issues, and methods of argumentation. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8318. The Corinthian Correspondence. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of I and/or II Corinthians in the context of Paul's pastoral relationship to Corinth. Integrity, background and purpose of the letters. Examination of important themes, issues, and methods of argumentation. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8319. Shorter Pauline Letters. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of one or more of the following letters: Galatians, Philippians, I and II Thessalonians, and Philemon. Background and purpose of these writings. Examination of important Pauline themes, issues, and methods of argumentation. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8320. Colossians and Ephesians. 3 cr. hrs.

Authorship, milieu, and purpose of these letters. Their relationship to one another and to other Pauline traditions. Review of critical issues and examination of theological themes and methods of argumentation. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8321. Later New Testament Writings. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of one or more of the following New Testament texts: I and II Timothy; Titus; Hebrews; James; I and II Peter; I, II, and III John; Jude; and Revelation 1-3. Background, purpose, and theology of these writings. Exegesis of key passages. Relationship of these works to selected non-canonical writings. Greek text used. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8350. Special Questions in New Testament Studies:. 3 cr. hrs.

Specialized research on topics or problems within and/or related to the New Testament writings. Greek text used. Prereq: THEO 6120 and cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8410. Ecclesiastical Historiography. 3 cr. hrs.

The interpretation of the history of the Church and of doctrine as seen by ecclesiastical historians from Eusebius to Harnack; their characteristic approaches and concerns. Recent trends in historiography and historical theology. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8411. History of Christian Thought 1: The Age of the Fathers. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the development of Christian beliefs and doctrines in the patristic age. The following themes are treated: the authority of Scripture and tradition; Father, Word, Spirit, and the divine Triad; the person of Jesus the Christ; sin, redemption and grace; the Church and the sacraments. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8412. History of Christian Thought 2: Byzantine Tradition. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of Greek theology from Nicea (325 A.D.) to the fall of Constantinople (1453). Particular attention to the most important writers following the Council of Chalcedon, beginning with Dionysius Areopagita and concluding with Gregory Palamas and Nicholas Cabasilas. Focus on the abiding Greek preoccupation with salvation as deification and its contribution to the continuity of Eastern Christian thought. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8413. History of Christian Thought 3: The Middle Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the development of Christian theology from Augustine to Thomas Aquinas. Includes the following themes: the character and method of theology after Augustine; monastic theology; the early Eucharistic controversies; reason, logic, and the origins of Scholasticism; 12th century humanism and theology; Scholasticism; and Thomism. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8414. History of Christian Thought 4: The Later Middle Ages and the Reformation. 3 cr. hrs.

Theological pluralism of the 13th-15th centuries. Thomism and nominalism, mysticism and humanism, conciliarism, Augustinianism. Reform, questions of authority, faith, catholicity. Sixteenth century responses. Luther to Calvin, Muenster to Menno Simons, early Roman Catholic polemical theology to Trent. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8415. History of Christian Thought 5: The Modern Era. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of major developments in Christian life and thought in the 17th-19th centuries in Europe, with a focus on intellectual history. Jansenism and Cartesianism; the impact of Enlightenment thought. The Romantic revivals of theology in Schleiermacher and the Tubingen Schools. German Idealism and its debacle. Biblical criticism. Varieties of 19th century options in theology. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8416. History of Christian Thought 6: Theology in America. 3 cr. hrs.

An analysis of developments in American theology from Puritanism to the present. Examines representative theologians of Puritanism, revivalism, enlightenment, progressive orthodoxy, social gospel, modernism, Americanism, and neo-orthodoxy within the context of American political and social movements. Themes considered: the church, grace, religious liberty, church and state, voluntaryism, person of Jesus, tradition, adaptation. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8417. The Apostolic Fathers and the Apologists. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the Christian writings of the 2nd century, especially Clement of Rome, Ignatius of Antioch, the Epistle of Barnabas, the Didache, the Greek apologists, and Irenaeus, with particular attention to their relation to the Old and New Testaments, the doctrine of the Logos, Church order, and the emerging understanding of orthodoxy and heresy. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; may not be taken for credit by students who have taken the same course as THEO 8415.

THEO 8418. Clement, Origen and the Alexandrian Tradition. 3 cr. hrs.

Against the background of Clement's attempt to incorporate Greek modes of thought into Christianity, an extensive study of Origen as a biblical commentator and the first systematic theologian, with some consideration of the neoplatonic tradition in Christianity, Origen's influence on later theology, and the Origenist controversies. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; may not be taken for credit by students who have taken the same course as THEO 8417.

THEO 8419. The Greek Fathers of the Fourth Century. 3 cr. hrs.

Reading and study of some of the writings of Athanasius, Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa and others, with attention given to the Trinitarian controversies of the 4th century, the councils of Nicea and Constantinople, and the rise and fall of Arianism. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; may not be taken for credit by students who have taken the same course as THEO 8418.

THEO 8420. History and Theology of the New Testament Canon. 3 cr. hrs.

The Septuagint as the first Christian Bible; authority for religious truth in the Apostolic Fathers and the Apologists; evidence for the liturgical use of Christian writings; the apocryphal New Testament; the canon of four gospels; the collection of the Apostles' letters; lists of canonical books; the beginnings of exegesis; modern theological speculation on the canon. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8421. Augustine of Hippo. 3 cr. hrs.

An intensive study of Augustine's life, writings and thought. Topics include: the influence of neoplatonism on Augustine, the stages of his conversion, the implications of the Donatist controversy for his views on the Church and the sacraments, and the controversy with Pelagius on grace and predestination. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8422. Monastic Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Proposes a reading of the classical "canon" of early monastic literature. Beginning with a few sessions devoted to sources, the course moves to the early Syrians, notably Aphrahat of Persia and Ephrem Syrus, and then to the better-known and enormously influential "Vita Antonii," the several "Vitae" of Pachomius, the "History of the Monks of Egypt," Basil the Great's "Longer and Shorter Rules," Gregory of Nyssa, Evagrius of Pontus, the "Macarian Homilies," such early 5th century works as Palladius of Hieropolis' "Lausiac History," John Casian's "Institutes" and "Conferences," Theodoret of Cyrrhus' "Historia religosa," and the "Sayings of the Desert Fathers." Concludes with an examination of Benedict of Nursia's "Life" (by Gregory the Great) and "Rule." Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8423. Theology in the Twelfth Century. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of theology in monasteries and cathedral schools, from the Gregorian Reform to Alan of Lille, including; e.g., Anselm of Canterbury, Peter Abelard, Bernard of Clairvaux, the Victorines, Peter Lombard. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8424. The Theology of Thomas Aquinas. 3 cr. hrs.

The critical reading of the texts of Aquinas in developmental sequence with emphasis on the character of the Summa theologiae. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8425. The Theology of Bonaventure. 3 cr. hrs.

Readings and study of both the academic and the mystical writings of Bonaventure, with special emphasis on the Breviloquium. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8426. The Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Medieval exegesis from the Carolingian renaissance to the 13th century, with special attention to the relationship between scripture commentaries and systematic theologies; the multiple senses of Scripture in theory and practice; authors include; e.g., Rupert of Deutz, Bernard of Clairvaux, the Victorines, Aquinas and his teachers. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8427. Late Medieval Augustinianism. 3 cr. hrs.

Revival of Augustinian thought. Wyclif, Hus to Bradwardine. Via Gregorii. Commentaries on St. Augustine. Anti-Pelagianism and Donatism. Mediation of Augustinian thought to subsequent periods. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8428. Interpretation of the Bible in the Renaissance and Reformation. 3 cr. hrs.

Hermeneutical developments from the Victorines. Sources and methods for interpreting historical exegesis. Humanist work on Scripture. The place of the Bible in theology. Luther as doctor of Scripture. Trent and Bible study. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8429. Erasmus. 3 cr. hrs.

Biography and developments of his thought. Study of Scripture and the classics. Commentaries on Scripture. Philosophia Christi. Changing attitudes toward Erasmus. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8430. Luther. 3 cr. hrs.

Developments of Luther's thought in relation to medieval theology. Influence of nominalism and mysticism on Luther. Origins of his hermeneutic and doctrine of justification. Importance of his theology of reformation, law/gospel, and man. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8431. Calvin. 3 cr. hrs.

Biography and development of his major writings. Systematic construction of the Institutes of the Christian Religion. Calvin on Scripture, sanctification and predestination, and early results in Calvinism. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8432. Council of Trent. 3 cr. hrs.

The positive contribution of Trent to the history of Christian thought. The "medieval" and "modern" character of the council. Trent's understanding of the reformers, and the question of "Counter-Reformation." Trent's position on Scripture and tradition, and its justification. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8433. Theological Thought of the Enlightenment and the Nineteenth Century. 3 cr. hrs.

Important theological developments, including movements and thinkers, in both the Catholic and Protestant traditions, in both Europe and America from the beginning of the Modern Era. Possible movements to be covered in this order: Deism, Rational Supernaturalism, Pietism, Romanticism, Speculative Idealism, French Catholic Thought (Traditionalism, Fideism), Oxford Movement, Tubingen School, Protestant Liberalism, Biblical Criticism and Darwinism, Ultramontanism and Neo-Thomism, Roman Catholic Thought and Modernism, Existentialism, and Atheism. Possible figures covered: Herbert of Cherbury, Tillotson, Locke, Toland, Tindal, Voltaire, Wolff, Semler, Reimarus, Lessing, Rousseau, Butler, Hume, Kant, Jacobi, Hamann, Herder, Coleridge, Schleiermacher, Busnell, Hegel, F. C. Baur, Biedermann, John and Edward Caird, Chateaubriand, Maistre, Lamennais, Bautain, Keble, Newman, Williams, Pusey, Drey, Mohler, Strauss, Feuerbach, Marx, Williams, Goodwin, Jowett, Darwin, Moore, Hodge, Abbott, Ritschl, Herrmann, Harnack, Rauschenbusch, Hodge, Warfield, Leo XIII, Mercier, Garrigou-Lagrange, Olle-Laprune, Blondel, Laberthonniere, Loisy, Le Roy, Tyrrell, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche. Not all significant movements and thinkers are covered in one term. Prereq: THEO 6210, THEO 6220, and THEO 6310, or their equiv.'s (i.e., the master's-level introductory courses), unless the student has passed out of this material on the M.A. Exam.

THEO 8434. Schleiermacher. 3 cr. hrs.

A close reading of the most important theological works of F.D.E. Schleiermacher (1768-1834), the "father of modern theology," with a view to understanding the basic concepts and historical development of Schleiermacher's thought within the context of post-Enlightenment European philosophical-theological ideas and movements. Prereq: THEO 6210 and THEO 6220, or their equiv.'s (i.e., the master's-level introductory courses on the history of theology), unless the student has passed out of this material on the M.A. Exam.

THEO 8435. Images of the Church through the Ages. 3 cr. hrs.

Covers the historical journey of the Christian church as it began and developed through its leading images/symbols/models. Prereq: THEO 6210, THEO 6220, and THEO 6310, or equiv.'s (i.e., the master's-level introductory courses), unless the student has passed out of this material on the M.A. Exam.

THEO 8436. The Roman Catholic Modernist Crisis. 3 cr. hrs.

Modernist controversies as the explosion of tensions long building between liberalism and orthodoxy, immanentist and extrinsecist religious thought, and tradition and critical history before and after 1900. An interpretation of the episodes in Roman Catholic theology (concerning Loisy, Blondel, von Hugel, Tyrrell) that formed the backdrop to the generation of Vatican II. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8437. Theology of Jonathan Edwards. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines Edwards' major theological works and analyzes his chief contributions to American theology. Particular focus on Edwards' understanding of God, original sin, the atonement, freedom, religious experience, true virtue, providence, and the millennium. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8438. Theology in the American Enlightenment. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines how the Enlightenment influenced Christian thought in the United States between 1700 and 1830, paying special attention to the issues raised by critical reason relative to the understanding of revelation, Christ, the supernatural, church and state, and Christians; e.g., the Unitarian W.E. Channing, the Princetonian Presbyterian C. Hodge, and the Catholic J. England. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8439. Theology and Romanticism in the United States. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines representative American Protestant and Catholic theologies that were most directly influenced by Romanticism; e.g., the Transcendentalism of R. W. Emerson and T. Parker, the Progressive Orthodoxy of H. Bushnell, the Mercersbury Theology of W. Nevin and P. Schaff, the Ontologism and moderate traditionalism of O. Brownson and I. Hecker, the Confessionalism of C. P. Krauth. Concentration upon the roles these theologians assigned to revelation, divine immanence in history, church and society, religious intuition, ecclesiastical and confessional authority. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8440. American Catholic Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

A historical examination of the theologies of American Catholics from John Carroll to John Courtney Murray. Analysis of major pastoral and systematic theologians (e.g., John England, Francis P. Kenrick, Orestes Brownson, Isaac Hecker, John Ireland, John A. Ryan, Gustave Weigel) within the context of American and European theological developments. Examination of American Catholic perceptions of Christology, grace, ecclesiology, church-state relations, social thought, the Bible, and modern sciences with a focus upon the relationship of religion and republicanism. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8441. The Social Gospel in American Theologies. 3 cr. hrs.

Examinations of the social thought of representative American Protestants and Catholics of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, concentrating upon the various perceptions of Christianity's relationship to the social and economic problems of the day. Analysis of the works of Washington Gladden, Richard Ely, Josiah Strong, Walter Rauschenbusch, Edward McGlynn, John A. Ryan, Paul H. Furfey, Dorothy Day, and Virgil Michel. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8442. Dionysius the Areopagite: Father of Mysticism?. 3 cr. hrs.

Intended to be primarily a close reading of (Pseudo-) Dionysius the Aeropagite (ca. 500), whose small corpus of works profoundly influenced subsequent Christian thought. Analyzes his background, his treatises and "epistles," noting his sources and parallels in preceding and contemporary Christian, pagan Neoplatonist, and Jewish mystical literature. Also traces out the Dionysian "trajectory" in selected later Eastern Christian writers. Prereq: THEO 6210 and cons. of dept. ch.; or a passing grade on the relevant section of the M.A. Exam.

THEO 8443. Symeon the New Theologian-Sources and Heirs. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines Symeon the New Theologian (949-1022), the most striking and attractive of the Byzantine spiritual writers, who too often is treated somewhat in isolation from the sources and currents which feed him. Begins with 5th century writers such as Diadochus of Photiki and Mark the Monk, runs through Dionysius, Maximus, and John of the Ladder in the 6th-7th centuries (possibly including the "Gaza School" and Palestinian monasticism), and continues through Symeon, to the Hesychasts of the 14th and 15th centuries, notably Gregory of Sinai and Gregory Palamas. Prereq: THEO 6210 and cons. of dept. ch.; or a passing grade on the relevant section of the M.A. Exam.

THEO 8444. PreNicene Ascetical and Mystical Literature. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of Christian literature primarily from East of the Adriatic (at least as presently constituted), dealing with asceticism and the "visio Dei." Begins with Old Testament materials, looks at intertestamental literature including the Qumran Scrolls, and trajectories extending from the Second Temple to Rabbinic-era, Jewish mystical texts. Then moves to the New Testament, with special attention to Paul and Luke-Acts, and continues through the early martyrologies and New Testament apocrypha, in particular the apocryphal acts of the Apostles, and early Manichean materials. Concludes with the Alexandrians, Clement and Origen, and possibly Methodius of Olympus at the turn of the 4th century. Prereq: THEO 6210 and cons. of dept. ch.; or a passing grade on the relevant section of the M.A. Exam.

THEO 8445. The Development of Roman Catholic Theology from the Enlightenment to the Present. 3 cr. hrs.

Focuses on the historical development of Roman Catholic theology from the Enlightenment to the present. Treats movements such as French Romanticism, Gallicanism, Ultramontanism, Newmanism, Modernism, New Theology and Transcendental Thomism, Vatican II and post-Vatican II developments. Treats the thought of selected Roman Catholic theologians. In the 19th century: French theologians Chateaubriand, de Maistre, Lamennais, Bautain; the Tubingen theologians (e.g., Drey, Mohler); Newman and the Oxford Movement; the New Apologetics (e.g., Blondel, Laberthonniere); the "Modernists" (e.g., Loisy, Tyrrell). In the 20th century: New Theology and Transcendental Thomism (e.g., Rousselot, Marechal, de Lubac, Karl Rahner, Lonergan, Schillebeeckx); Liturgical Movement (e.g., Jungmann, Casel, Dix); Vatican II and Aggiornamento (e.g., Congar, Kung, Courtney Murray, Balthasar, Ratzinger); Political and Liberation Theologies (e.g., Metz, Gutierrez, Segundo, Leonard Boff); Feminist Theology (e.g., Schussler Fiorenza, Radford Ruether, Pilar Aquino). Prereq: THEO 6210, THEO 6220, and THEO 6310, or equiv.'s (i.e., the master's-level introductory courses), unless the student has passed out of this material on the M.A. Exam.

THEO 8446. History of Christian Theology in the Twentieth Century. 3 cr. hrs.

Possible schools/movements and figures to be covered: Eschatological school (J. Weiss, Schweitzer), Religionsgeschichtliche Schule (Troeltsch), American Empiricism and Naturalism (William James, D.C. Macinosh, Dewey, Wieman), Dialectical Theology (Barth, Brunner, Gogarten, Bonhoeffer), Christian Existentialism (Marcel, Tillich, Bultmann), Christian Realism (H.R. Niebuhr, Reinhold Niebuhr), the Nouvelle Theologie and Transcendental Thomism (Rousselot, Marechal, de Lubac, K. Rahner, Lonergan, Schillebeeckx), Vatican II and renewed Roman Catholic Theology (Congar, John XXIII, Kung, John Courtney Murray, Balthasar, Ratzinger), Political Theology and Liberation Theologies (Metz, Moltmann, Gutierrez, Segundo, L. Boff, Sobrino). Not all of these movements and figures are covered in one term. Prereq: THEO 6210, THEO 6220, and THEO 6310, or equiv.'s (i.e., the master's-level introductory courses), unless the student has passed out of this material on the M.A. Exam.

THEO 8450. Special Questions in the History of Christian Thought:. 3 cr. hrs.

Specialized research in one area or problem in the history of Christian thought. Specific topic(s) announced. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8510. Christian Anthropology. 3 cr. hrs.

Different concepts of anthropology today. The central interest in anthropology in different fields, including philosophy and theology, in the last 50 years. The relationship between anthropology, theology, Christology. Human existence according to the Old and New Testaments. The realities of history, world, and freedom as related to meaning in human existence. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8511. Atheism and Theism. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of the basic theistic and atheistic options regarding the ultimate meaning and value of human life. Socio-cultural and religious roots of these options. Criteria of truth for determining validity. Examination of representative writings, classical and modern, which discuss these options. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8512. God in Contemporary Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Nineteenth and 20th century roots (philosophical, social, and religious) of present understandings of God. Classical and contemporary discussion of the nature and validity of theistic language. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8513. The Structure of Religious Experience. 3 cr. hrs.

Analysis of the structure of religious experience and related phenomena as explored through a variety of perspectives, such as philosophy, sociology, psychology, and theology. The nature and function of religion in human life in relation to the individual and social development of the human person. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8514. Hermeneutic Theory and Theological Method. 3 cr. hrs.

Nineteenth century hermeneutical discussion. Contemporary hermeneutical inquiries and their methodological implications for theology. Phenomenology and hermeneutical theory. Bultmannian and post-Bultmannian developments. Hermeneutics and the critique of ideologies. Points of contact between hermeneutics and linguistic analysis. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8515. Philosophy as Source and Resource for Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Critical examination of philosophical texts which have played an important role in framing theological questions and discussions; of representative theological texts for how philosophical issues and presuppositions bear on their interpretation; of representative accounts (historical and contemporary) of the relationship between theology and philosophy. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8516. The Trinity. 3 cr. hrs.

Historical and systematic presentation of the doctrine of the Trinity. The development of this doctrine in early Christian history. The notions of substance, person, procession, relation, and communion as they occur in patristic tradition and in later Scholastic theology. Other approaches to this doctrine in the light of contemporary philosophy and theology. Role of this doctrine in contemporary Christian experience. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8517. Christology. 3 cr. hrs.

Historical and systematic presentation of the doctrine of the Incarnation. Christ, the Mediator between God and humanity, as the fullness of all revelation. Christology in the New Testament. The development of the doctrine of the Incarnation in the Christian church with special attention given to the councils of Ephesus and Chalcedon, Scholastic theology, and contemporary approaches to the mystery of Jesus. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8518. Soteriology. 3 cr. hrs.

Specific redemptive function of Jesus Christ and then of the Christian community, the sacraments and the world in which one lives. Grace and human development. Salvation as a personal and societal reality; redemption of the social order. Salvation of the nonbeliever, in particular the relationship between salvation and revelation. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8519. Ecclesiology. 3 cr. hrs.

Biblical understanding of the Christian community. Development of the institutional church through history. Current theological models of the church. Current discussion of the mission, functions, and structures of the church in the world today. The relation of the Christian churches to one another. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8520. Theology of Christian Liturgy. 3 cr. hrs.

A systematic study of the Church at prayer in Trinitarian and ecumenical perspectives. The Church's faith in God's saving action through its own ritual self-offering seen in light of human sciences, phenomenology and Christian doctrine. Liturgy examined as symbolic communication, as actualization of Christian community, and in its relationship to the rest of Christian life and theology. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8521. Christian Eschatology. 3 cr. hrs.

Analysis of Biblical and historical forms of Christian eschatology. Comparison of Christian perspectives with cyclic approaches to history and apocalyptic approaches to the end of history. The centrality of eternal life to the Christian message of the Kingdom of God. Resurrection as the principal locus of Christian expectations. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8522. Major Figures in Modern Theology:. 3 cr. hrs.

Intensive examination of the writings of a thinker who has had a significant impact on theology within the last hundred years. Focuses on the primary texts of a particular theologian or school of thought. Also assesses their contribution to theology and the life of the Church and examines critical evaluations. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8523. Doctrinal Themes in Contemporary Protestant Systematic Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

Analysis and evaluation of important contemporary Protestant systematic theologians in terms of a single theme or related set of themes to be chosen by the instructor. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8524. Doctrinal Themes in Contemporary Roman Catholic Systematic Theology:. 3 cr. hrs.

Analysis and evaluation of important contemporary Roman Catholic systematic theologians in terms of a single theme or related set of themes to be chosen by the instructor. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8525. Theological Method: Interdisciplinary Implications. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of methodological interrelations between theology and other academic disciplines in terms of a single theme or related set of themes to be chosen by the instructor. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8526. Fundamental Themes in the Theology of Bernard Lonergan. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of major texts of Bernard Lonergan. Themes vary: grace, Trinity, Christology, method. Also considers developments by other authors. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8527. Fundamental Themes in the Theology of Karl Rahner. 3 cr. hrs.

Intensive examination of major themes and texts in Karl Rahner's writings. Focuses on the primary texts, assesses their contribution to theology and the life of the Church and examines critical evaluations. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8528. Theology of Karl Barth. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of Karl Barth's major texts, primarily, but not exclusively, his Church Dogmatics. Themes may include his Christology, method, moral theology and/or political theology. An examination of his relation to those who came before him, those against whom he reacted, as well as those who developed his thought in the 20th and 21st century. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8529. Nouvelle Theologie. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of the theological movement of the 20th century known as "la nouvelle théologie" or "ressourcement" that reacted to neo-scholasticism and sought to reunify theology through a reappropriation of the sources - the liturgy, Scriptures, and the Early Church Fathers. Representative figures include Henri de Lubac, Jean Daniélou, Henri Bouillard, Yves Congar, Louis Bouyer, Marie-Dominique Chenu, and Hans Urs von Balthasar. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8530. Theology of the Holy Spirit. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the biblical, historical and systematic aspects of pneumatology. Attention given to the Holy Spirit and the doctrine of the Trinity with consideration of the ecumenical implications of the Filioque, the Spirit in creation and redemption, the mission of the Holy Spirit relative to that of the Son, and the importance of pneumatology for the entire spectrum of Christian doctrine. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8531. Theology of Grace. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the doctrine of grace in its historical developments and in contemporary systematic theology. Attention given to the following: nature and grace, distinctions in the types and modalities of grace, grace and human freedom/predestination, justification and sanctification, grace in the church and the world. Also includes consideration of ecumenical convergences and/or divergences (Catholic and Protestant, Eastern and Western Churches). Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8532. Ecumenism. 3 cr. hrs.

A study of ecumenism, the efforts of the Christian churches to restore unity, ecumenical principles, the nature, goal and reception of dialogues, major Catholic encyclicals and directives on ecumenism, and significant recent ecumenical agreements between churches. An assessment of the points of ecumenical convergence and remaining differences on select doctrinal topics involving the Catholic Church. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8533. Christians and Muslims in Dialogue. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of the efforts made to advance Muslim-Christian relations. An examination of joint declarations issued by formal dialogues as well as select individual contributions of Muslim and Christian scholars. Primary attention to those dialogues sponsored by the sub-unit on Dialogue with Peoples of Living Faiths of the World Council of Churches, and the Pontifical Council of Interreligious Dialogue. Includes dialogues co-sponsored and/or organized by Muslim organizations. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8534. Fundamental Theology. 3 cr. hrs.

A historical and systematic study of the fundamentals of theology: faith, revelation, tradition, and Church. Attention given to: faith as the response to revelation, the connection between faith and reason, revelation as God's self-communication, the relationship between scripture and tradition, and the role of the magisterium in preserving and interpreting sacred scripture and tradition. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8535. Public Theology in Postmodern Context. 3 cr. hrs.

The interpretation and application of the gospel to a given cultural context in the light of Scripture and Tradition. Not identical with the normative reflections of social ethics nor assuming the narratives of liberation and political theology, public theology focuses on public issues for the sake of the churches and on Christian meanings for the sake of the public square and the common good. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8536. Theology of Hans Urs von Balthasar. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the major texts of Hans Urs von Balthasar, with special attention given to his trilogy. Possible themes include: Balthasar's elucidation of beauty as essential to theological discourse, Balthasar's efforts to reunite theology and spirituality through the fundamental connection between holiness and the theological enterprise, and Balthasar's Christological and Trinitarian theological method. A consideration of Balthasar's contribution to theology today. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8537. Theology of Jürgen Moltmann. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the theology of Jürgen Moltmann, both in its development and in its major themes. An emphasis on the close connection between theology and practice in Moltmann and the way his work represents a specific understanding of the task of theology. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8540. Interfacing Theology and the Natural Sciences. 3 cr. hrs.

Ways in which theology and the natural sciences (e.g., physics, biology, and geology) have been related historically provide the perspective from which to examine current efforts to reflect on God, the world and humanity in a scientific age. Basic scientific facts and established theories inform theological discourse, and scientists are consulted for more in-depth understanding. Methods for teaching constructive relationship of the disciplines are explored and demonstrated by students. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8550. Special Questions in Systematic Theology:. 3 cr. hrs.

Specialized research in one area or problem in systematic theology. Specific topic(s) announced. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8610. Moral Theology: The Catholic Tradition. 3 cr. hrs.

General outlines of the development and exposition of Catholic moral theology through an examination of historical studies of Christian Ethics written in the 20th century and of selected original texts. Moral teaching in early Christianity; development of systems of moral teaching; the history of casuistry; moral theology as a separate theological discipline; the understanding of the love commandment as found in different periods. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8611. The Protestant Tradition in Christian Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of selected writings of the Reformers on ethical subjects and of selected ethical writings from important Protestant schools of theology. Representatives of sectarian Protestant thought on ethical topics. Contemporary developments in Christian ethics found in the writings of outstanding Protestant thinkers in this century. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8612. Basic Issues in Christian Social Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Social teaching of the Christian churches. A systematic treatment of issues such as the relation between love and justice. The teachings of the Christian churches on matters such as war and peace; the rights and duties of states and citizens; the rights, duties, and obligations of members of a family; the rights, duties, and obligations of parents with respect to their children. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8613. Method in Theological Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of contemporary developments in methodological approaches to theological ethics. Particular attention to the theological nature of methodology as well as the interrelationship between other academic disciplines and the formation of method in theological ethics. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8614. Health Care Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Exploration of theological perspectives on medicine. Particular attention to thinking on health care within the Catholic tradition, as well as developments across the Christian tradition. Emphasis on theological methodology as well as engagement with select ethical issues in medicine. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8615. Body, Gender and Sexuality. 3 cr. hrs.

Analysis of how the human person's being a body directs our thinking in Christian theology. Human bodies as essential to what humans are, as both a possible limit on humans and an occasion of transcendence. The body as a source of thinking about persons and how they should act. The nature of sexual differentiation and of gender and implications for Christian anthropology and ethics. Human sexuality and its influence on individuals and communities. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8616. Theology and Economics. 3 cr. hrs.

A theological evaluation of economic theories and practices, particularly as they bear on the rise and ascendancy of the global market. Includes a history of economic thought with particular attention to moral theory. The tradition of economic thought within Christian theology. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8617. Catholic Social Thought. 3 cr. hrs.

A comprehensive examination of the engagement of Catholic faith with the public square. Detailed analysis of fundamental themes within the Catholic Social Teaching tradition through a study of the documents of the papal encyclical tradition, social thought originating from and upon the U.S. context, and the various interpretations of the Catholic Social Teaching tradition. Consideration of Catholic socio-ethical engagement with emerging concerns in public discourse. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8618. Liberation Ethics and the Option for the Poor. 3 cr. hrs.

An exploration of the ethical dimensions of liberationist theological reflection, addressing the contributions and challenges to Christian moral discourse, analysis, and reflection, which emerge from the theologies of liberation and their stance of solidarity with the victims of injustice. Attention given to both the commonality and diversity present in this theological movement. Consideration of the implications of the option for the poor for ethical reflection and action. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8619. Theology, Technology and Ethics. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides an historical overview of theological discourse on technology, considers effects of current technologies (e.g., biotechnology, social communications, artificial intelligence, energy and transportation), addresses ethical principles pertaining to their research, development, deployment and use from the perspective of Catholic and other Christian traditions, and explores and demonstrates effective methods for teaching this interdisciplinary subject. May include the views of other world religions.

THEO 8620. Ecological Degradation. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores how the theological traditions of Christianity, Judaism and Islam recognize as moral problems the loss of biological diversity, degradation of ecological systems and threats to the biosphere caused by human actions. Critically examines contemporary theological efforts (e.g., reconstructionist and eco-feminist) to address these problems. Develops effective approaches to teaching at the undergraduate level. The traditions and perspectives of other world religions (e.g., Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism) may be included. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8650. Special Questions in Moral Theology:. 3 cr. hrs.

Specialized research in one area or problem in moral theology. Specific topic(s) announced. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8710. Special Questions in Interdisciplinary Studies:. 3 cr. hrs.

Specialized research in one area or problem in interdisciplinary studies. Specific topic(s) announced. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 8711. Teaching Theology at the College Level. 1 cr. hr.

Explores effective means of teaching religious knowledge in the liberal arts setting and addresses teaching models and learning styles, design of lesson plans, syllabi, conducting student discussions, and testing methods. Provides opportunities to practice classroom techniques and receive student evaluation. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch. Students with M.A. may enroll after completing one year of graduate course work. Students without M.A. may enroll after two years of graduate course work.

THEO 8995. Independent Study in Theology. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of graduate prog. dir.

THEO 8999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 cr. hrs.

S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9970. Graduate Standing Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9974. Graduate Fellowship: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9975. Graduate Assistant Teaching: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9976. Graduate Assistant Research: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9984. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9985. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9986. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9987. Doctoral Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9988. Doctoral Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9989. Doctoral Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9991. Professional Project Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9992. Professional Project Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9993. Professional Project Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9994. Master's Thesis Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9995. Master's Thesis Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9996. Master's Thesis Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9997. Doctoral Dissertation Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9998. Doctoral Dissertation Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

THEO 9999. Doctoral Dissertation Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.