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Administration
Dean: William K. Lobb, D.D.S., M.S., M.P.H.
Interim Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies: Thomas G. Bradley, B.D.S., M.S.

Program Directors
Dental Biomaterials: David Berzins, B.S., Ph.D.
Advanced Education in General Dentistry: Joseph M. Vitolo, D.M.D., M.S., Ph.D.
Endodontics: Sheila Stover, D.D.S., M.S., M.P.H.
Orthodontics: Jose Bosio, D.D.S., M.S.
Prosthodontics: Geoffrey Thompson, B.A., D.D.S., M.S.
marquette.edu/dentistry/

Degrees Offered

Master of Science, Plan A only, with two options (see the Master’s Requirements section for details); Certificate

Specializations

Master’s: Dental Biomaterials, Endodontics, Orthodontics, Prosthodontics

Certificate: Advanced Education in General Dentistry, Endodontics, Orthodontics, Prosthodontics

Graduate Program Overview

The School of Dentistry offers graduate programs in dental biomaterials, and the ADA-accredited programs in advanced education in general dentistry (AEGD), endodontics, orthodontics, and prosthodontics. These programs can be modified to allow conjoint interdisciplinary graduate work to be undertaken in any other unit of the university, and a master of science or doctoral degree can be obtained through an appropriate graduate degree-granting department of the university or through the interdisciplinary Ph.D. program. Faculty for each dental graduate program are drawn both from full-time Dental School faculty and from practicing specialists in the field who serve as adjunct faculty (part-time faculty).

The AEGD program is an ADA-accredited one-year clinical program. Upon successful completion of all clinical and didactic requirements, a certificate is issued. There is no tuition for the 1-year program and residents receive stipends. For candidates who have successfully completed the AEGD certificate program, an optional 1-year fellowship program is available. Fellows do not receive a stipend and do not pay tuition. Availability of fellowships is subject to approval.

The dental biomaterials program is a non-accredited 2-year program leading to a master’s degree. 

The specialty programs of endodontics, orthodontics and prosthodontics are clinically and research based, offering a specialty certificate and a master’s degree. Graduates are prepared to handle complex clinical cases and to work effectively with both general dentists and other dental specialists. For all the specialty programs, the master’s degree is required (certificates will not be awarded without the master’s degree). The endodontics program is a 24-month program, the orthodontics program is a 26.5-month program, and the prosthodontics program is a 36-month program. Tuition for the specialty programs is charged at a flat rate (20% during the summer term, 40% during the fall term, and 40% during the spring term). Any applicable instrument or service fees are charged during the fall term each year.

Specialty Certificate Requirements

Course work requirements for each graduate specialty program (endodontics, orthodontics and prosthodontics) are determined by the director of the specific program in accordance with accreditation standards. Courses include study in basic health sciences, dental biomaterials, research methodology, clinical dental specialties and other related science disciplines, as appropriate. In addition to course work, students also must complete patient care requirements, pass a comprehensive clinical examination, and submit all required evaluation data to receive the certificate. 

Prerequisites for Admission

Selection for admission is based upon the applicant’s academic standing and clinical abilities. Competitive applicants will rank high in their dental school classes, have strong clinical skills and experiences, and have some experience with research. In general, to be admitted to any of the graduate programs in clinical dentistry, the applicant must have graduated from an accredited dental school.

For the dental biomaterials program, the applicant may be either a dental school graduate or have a baccalaureate degree in science or engineering. In special cases, a student with a baccalaureate degree in another area, but who has an appropriate background, may be admitted to the dental biomaterials program.

Application Deadlines

July 15
For the advanced specialty program in endodontics starting in June of the following year.

Sept. 1
For orthodontics and prosthodontics programs starting in June of the following year.

Oct. 1
For first round interviews for the AEGD program starting in July of the following year. Applications will be accepted beyond this deadline until all available AEGD positions are filled. For information on position availability, applicants applying after Oct. 1 should call (414) 288-3323 or email jacqueline.webster@marquette.edu.

Note: Applicants to dental biomaterials are encouraged to have their complete application submitted by February 1 to be considered for the fall entry class. Spring semester entry is possible every other year (even years). The program director notifies admitted students regarding the starting date for their program.

Application Requirements

Applicants must submit, directly to the Graduate School:

  1. A completed Marquette University application form and application fee online at marquette.edu/grad/future_apply.shtml. Applicants must apply through Marquette, or they will not be considered for admission. In addition, applicants may also apply through the Postdoctoral Application Support Service (PASS) operated by the American Dental Education Association (ADEA), but it is not required. The orthodontics program does not accept PASS.
  2. Official transcripts from all current and previous colleges/universities except Marquette. International applicants must have course grades converted to numerical values of 4.000, 3.000, 2.000, and 1.000 or to corresponding letter grades of A, B, C, and D, respectively. Where such a conversion is not possible, an explanation of the grading system used in the foreign dental school and undergraduate institution should accompany the official English translation of the grade transcripts.
  3. Undergraduate and dental school grade-point averages, and class rank in dental school.
  4. Three letters of recommendation reflecting the applicant’s clinical and academic abilities.
  5. Scores from the National Board Dental Examinations, Part I and Part II. Not required from dental biomaterials applicants or from graduates of non-U.S./non-Canadian dental schools, except for AEGD applicants (see information above regarding Advanced Education in General Dentistry). 
  6. (For dental biomaterials applicants only) GRE scores strongly recommended (General Test only).
  7. (For dental biomaterials, endodontics, orthodontics and prosthodontics applicants) a curriculum vitae and a personal statement.
  8. (For orthodontics applicants only) registration with National Matching Service. The orthodontics program is part of the Postdoctoral Dental Matching Program. Details of this program can be obtained through the orthodontics department.
  9. (For international applicants only) a TOEFL score or other acceptable proof of English proficiency.

General Information

Non-Degree Students in Dentistry Courses

Normally, students with non-degree status are not permitted to enroll in dentistry courses. Graduate students from approved dental residency programs may enroll in any dental graduate courses but need prior approval from the School of Dentistry’s associate dean for research and graduate studies.

D.D.S./Graduate Program

The School of Dentistry, in close cooperation with the Graduate School, offers a doctor of dental surgery/graduate program which allows qualified students to take selected graduate courses while still in dental school. Interested dental students must formally apply for entrance into the program. Information is available from the associate dean for research and graduate studies in the School of Dentistry.

Once accepted into the D.D.S./graduate program, students are eligible to register for graduate courses offered by the School of Dentistry and other units of the university. To enroll in graduate courses, D.D.S./graduate program students must have written consent from course directors, the associate dean for research and graduate studies in the School of Dentistry, and the vice provost for research and dean of the Graduate School. Students must also submit a request form (available in the Graduate School office). The amount of graduate work available to students is determined by ability and progress within the D.D.S. program.

D.D.S./graduate students may seek admission to the following certificate or graduate programs offered by the School of Dentistry: dental biomaterials, endodontics, orthodontics or prosthodontics. Applications are subject to specified deadlines, and students are required to follow the normal competitive admission process. D.D.S./graduate students also may seek admission to other master’s programs such as biological sciences, education, engineering, business administration, mathematics/statistics/computer sciences, clinical psychology or public service. Upon acceptance into a master’s program, D.D.S./graduate students may formally request a transfer of completed graduate credits into the master’s program. Normally, a maximum of 12 credits may be transferred. (Transfer of credit forms are available in the Graduate School office.)

Further information about the D.D.S./graduate program can be obtained from the School of Dentistry associate dean for research and graduate studies.

Dental Graduate Didactic Core Curriculum

The Dental Graduate Didactic Core Curriculum (DENT 6001-6003) is designed to cover all didactic content areas applicable to the advanced practice of general dentistry and to each of the specialty areas of dentistry. The content areas are sequenced to present:

  1. material of interest for the general dentist seeking additional training beyond predoctoral dental education
  2. material of interest for each of the dental specialty areas
  3. advanced material of interest for those intending to pursue academic/research careers.

The presentations are organized to emphasize the overlapping nature of scientific foundational material and each of the dental specialties. Additionally, the presentations are designed to accommodate those students entering the program immediately after undergraduate education as well as those students returning from varying years of private dental practice. The course of study is comprised of yearly repeating content cycles (sections) within the summer session and fall/spring terms. The Dental Graduate Didactic Core Curriculum (DENT 6001-6003) is offered from 8-9 a.m. Monday–Friday. Beyond the required classes for their program, students may register for as many DENT 6001-6003 sections as they wish during their graduate education. The sections covered in DENT 6001-6003 are listed below and a detailed description of section content is maintained in the form of comprehensive section syllabi available in the School of Dentistry office of the associate dean for research and graduate studies. Students may register repeatedly for any grading period containing material of interest and are free to rotate in and out of the courses as desired to obtain sections containing such material. Repeated registration for DENT 6001-6003 is differentiated through the use of section numbers that appear on official transcripts. Examinations and credit hours are variable and are determined by selected course sections. Grades for each course section are submitted directly to the Graduate School by course instructors at the end of each term. Official transcripts will designate the specific sections completed and the credit hours associated with those sections.

The content area sections covered annually by the Graduate Didactic Core Curriculum are as follows:

  1. Emergency Medicine – A comprehensive review of the pathophysiology and treatment of the most common medical emergency states. Emphasis is placed on prevention, diagnosis, and patient stabilization.
  2. Dental Biomaterials – Physical, mechanical, chemical, biologic behavior, properties, characterization, and testing of dental biomaterials. Biocompatibility of dental materials as well as advanced clinical concepts for general dentistry.
  3. Advanced Prosthodontic Biomaterials – Advanced biomaterials and clinical concepts specific for prosthodontics.
  4. Advanced Endodontic Biomaterials – Advanced biomaterials and clinical concepts specific for endodontics.
  5. Advanced Orthodontic Biomaterials – Advanced biomaterials and clinical concepts specific for orthodontics.
  6. Interdisciplinary Periodontics – Structure/function of the periodontium. Periodontal disease and therapy as it relates to all other aspects of dentistry emphasizing surgical approaches, occlusion, splinting, and periodontic/endodontic pathosis.
  7. Interdisciplinary Prosthodontics – A comprehensive discussion of prosthodontic procedures as they relate to other areas of dental practice emphasizing removable complete/partial dentures, fixed partial dentures, maxillofacial prosthetics and implants.
  8. Interdisciplinary Endodontics – Endodontic techniques as they relate to other areas of dental practice.
  9. Interdisciplinary Orthodontics – A comprehensive discussion of orthodontic techniques as they relate to other areas of dental practice emphasizing cephalometrics, biomechanics of tooth movement, and tissue response to orthodontic procedures.
  10. Technology and Informatics – A review of the current computer-based technologies available for independent self-directed learning, research, teaching approaches, patient care and professional communication. Emphasis is placed on biomedical applications and laboratory exercises are included to reinforce didactic concepts.
  11. Craniofacial Growth and Development – Dental and facial growth and development from the embryonic period through adult life.
  12. Advanced Oral Pathology – Principles and concepts of histopathology presented through review and microscopic study of surgical material and biopsy specimens of craniofacial lesions emphasizing pathogenesis of disease and histologic diagnosis. Laboratory exercises are included to reinforce didactic concepts.
  13. Head/Neck Anatomy and Osteology – Systemic and regional approaches to the study of head/neck anatomy. Emphasis is placed on vasculature, musculature, innervation, lymphatic drainage, and morphology/anatomical landmarks of the various bones of the head/neck. Laboratory dissection and demonstration reinforce didactic concepts.
  14. Pharmacology and Pain/Anxiety Management – The pharmacology of drugs commonly used for treatment of non-dental conditions that may affect the delivery of dental care either through direct action or through interaction with drugs commonly used in dental care. Emphasizes the neurophysiology of pain, control of pain by various classes of pharmacologic agents, and the behavioral management of dental fears.
  15. Research Methodology/Design – An introduction to the research process. The scientific method is discussed. Emphasis is placed on selection of a suitable research topic, research ethics, simple study designs, and thesis preparaton.
  16. Biostatistics – An introduction to the various aspects of biostatistics. Emphasis is placed on data display and summary, summary statistics, populations and samples, probability and confidence intervals, power, type I and II errors, diagnostic tests, correlation and regression, and various test statistics.
  17. Oral Microbiology, Infection, and Immunology – Inflammation, immunity, and oral microbiology emphasizing the mechanisms of microbial colonization and invasion, host response and pathogenesis of dental diseases.
  18. Biochemistry and Physiology of Mineralized Tissues – The chemical and cellular constituents of mineralized tissues and modern methods for their study. Emphasis is placed on bone physiology and metabolism.
  19. Radiology and Imaging – Advanced concepts in radiology and modern imaging techniques applied to all aspects of dentistry.
  20. Craniomandibular Function and Disorders – Neuromuscular and occlusal physiology, diagnosis, and treatment of functional disturbances involving the craniofacial region.
  21. Temporomandibular Disorders in Orthodontics – Neuromuscular and occlusal physiology, diagnosis, and treatment of functional disturbances involving the temporomandibular articulation specific to orthodontics.
  22. Oral Pathophysiology – Current topics in salivary function/dysfunction, gingival crevicular fluid, de- and remineralization, and dentin sensitivity, and taste.
  23. Pediatrics – The special management and treatment concerns of pediatric patients emphasizing prevention and trauma.
  24. Inflammation and Wound Healing – Current concepts in the cell/molecular biology of inflammation and wound healing emphasizing predictable manipulation of the wound environment.
  25. Cell/Molecular Biology and Molecular Medicine – Current concepts in cell/molecular biology as they relate to diagnostics and treatment with emphasis on immunologic approaches and gene therapy.
  26. Speech Pathology – A review of the various speech pathologies emphasizing the interdisciplinary and integrative nature of treatment involving the dental professional.
  27. Public Health/Public Service – The epidemiology of dental disease and access to care emphasizing the role of the dental professional in community health. A review of current local, state and federal programs for dental services.
  28. Practice Management – A review of the current business aspects of dental practice for all aspects of dental specialties, with special emphasis on solo practice, group practice, dental clinics, and community health centers/institutionalized care.
  29. Practice Law – A review of the current legal aspects of dental practice for all areas of dentistry emphasizing patient care, infection control and employee relations.
  30. Practice Ethics – A review of various ethical dilemmas in practice settings including case studies for group discussion.
  31. Implantology – Basic concepts for implant placement including review of relevant maxillary/mandibular anatomy, evaluation and screening of patients, augmentation considerations, surgical techniques, surgical complications/management and relevant emergency procedures.

 

Graduate Dentistry Master's Requirements

Master of science degree applicants may only be admitted to the program under Plan A, which has two options: the traditional thesis option and the publication option. In partial fulfillment of the requirements to obtain the master of science degree, all candidates must complete the biostatistics and research design and methodology sections of the graduate core curriculum with a grade of BC or above, conduct a research project on an appropriate clinical or basic science topic, and successfully defend their research project. Format and content of the public defense is determined by the advisory committee.

Candidates are encouraged to pursue research that originates in their chosen dental specialty. Research projects are selected in consultation with the graduate program directors and the associate dean for research and graduate studies. Where possible, graduate students in advanced dental specialty programs are encouraged to do clinically relevant research. Graduate students in dental biomaterials pursue the application of scientific principles to the study of dental biomaterials including relationships among compositions, physical properties, and clinical properties for dental biomaterial systems.

Graduate students who choose the thesis option will have their research and thesis preparation supervised by a primary advisor and approved by a thesis advisory committee that consists of at least three members. The publication option, in addition, culminates in the acceptance of a first author, original, peer-reviewed publication based on a research project. Selection of the publication option requires completion of a traditional thesis in the event the submitted manuscript is not accepted by the submission deadline listed in this bulletin. All graduate students are required to present their research formally.

Advanced Education in General Dentistry

The School of Dentistry offers an Advanced Education in General Dentistry program that provides clinical experiences in all phases of general dentistry. The clinical training is complemented by a graduate didactic core curriculum that provides interdisciplinary education in the specialties of dentistry, and comprehensive diagnosis and treatment planning. The AEGD program is an intensive 12-month clinical care program. The program requires successful passing of the clinical and didactic course work resulting in a certificate from the Marquette University Graduate School. Completion of 30 credits is required for obtaining the AEGD certificate. No thesis is offered.

To qualify for an AEGD program stipend, applicants must be graduates of U.S. dental schools. Graduates of foreign dental schools must have the appropriate Visa/citizenship status (i.e. F-1, Permanent Resident or U.S. citizen) to qualify for a stipend.

Applicants must take and submit scores from Part I and Part II of the National Board Dental Examinations. Graduates of foreign dental schools must have taken and submitted their passing scores for Part I National Boards. While Part II Board scores are not an absolute requirement for foreign trained candidates, it is  strongly advised to have taken the exam and submit scores to make the application more competitive. 

Dental Biomaterials

A student in the dental biomaterials program must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of course work, consisting of a curriculum of graduate dental biomaterials courses (24 credits) and six credit hours of thesis work. The dental biomaterials graduate program is an interdisciplinary program covering principles of materials science, engineering, chemistry, physics, biology, and dentistry. Satisfactory completion of the didactic and research components of the program results in a master’s degree through the Marquette University Graduate School. In addition to the courses offered by the School of Dentistry (described in detail under the Dental Biomaterials course description section of this bulletin), master’s candidates may be required by their program adviser to select courses offered through the Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science or other departments. Elective courses in appropriate areas such as the dental graduate core curriculum (from the School of Dentistry) or materials science (from the College of Engineering) may also be selected according to the backgrounds and interests of the individual students.

Endodontics

A student in the endodontics program must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of course work, including four credit hours in clinical practice per academic year (a total of eight credit hours for each program) and six credit hours of thesis work. The remaining credits may be divided among courses specific to the specialty discipline and elective courses. The endodontics program requires two full years of patient care. Satisfactory completion of the didactic and clinical components of the programs results in a specialty certificate through the Marquette University Graduate School. Satisfactory completion of the research component of the programs results in a master’s degree through the Marquette University Graduate School. The master’s degree is required in order to receive the specialty certificate.

Orthodontics

 A student in the orthodontics program must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of course work, including four credit hours in clinical practice per academic year (a total of eight credit hours for each program) and six credit hours of thesis work. The remaining credits may be divided among courses specific to the specialty discipline and elective courses. The orthodontics program requires 26.5 months of patient care. Satisfactory completion of the didactic and clinical components of the programs results in a specialty certificate through the Marquette University Graduate School. Satisfactory completion of the research component of the programs results in a master’s degree through the Marquette University Graduate School. The master’s degree is required in order to receive the specialty certificate.

Prosthodontics

The prosthodontic program is a three-year program. A student in the prosthodontic program must complete a minimum of 42 credit hours of course work, including 12 credit hours of clinical practice, and six credit hours of thesis work. The remaining credits will be from courses assigned by the program director. The prosthodontics program requires three full years of patient care. Satisfactory completion of the didactic and clinical components of the program results in a specialty certificate through the Marquette University Graduate School. Satisfactory completion of the research component of the program results in a master’s degree through the Marquette University Graduate School. The master’s degree is required in order to receive the specialty certificate.

 

 

Adv Education in General Dent Courses

AEGD 6001. Clinical Advanced General Dentistry 1. 4 cr. hrs.

Residents are assigned clinical cases that require treatment in two or more clinical disciplines. Trainees are responsible for accurate compilation and documentation of clinical findings essential for appropriate treatment planning and case completion. Residents provide comprehensive dental services to patients or make referrals to appropriate specialists. Trainees also engage in assessment, management, and treatment of dental emergencies. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Admitted to AEGD program.

AEGD 6002. Clinical Advanced General Dentistry 2. 4 cr. hrs.

Residents continue cases begun earlier (see AEGD 6001) and begin treatment of additional cases. Increasingly difficult patients, including those with compromised medical histories, are introduced. Residents also respond to dental consults from medical disciplines in a hospital setting and learn hospital protocol. Emphasis on development of critical thinking skills and abilities to conduct individualized risk assessments and to design appropriate prevention measures while treating a diverse array of patients. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Admitted to AEGD program.

AEGD 6003. Clinical Advanced General Dentistry 3. 4 cr. hrs.

See AEGD 6002. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Admitted to AEGD program.

AEGD 6004. Clinical Advanced General Dentistry 4. 4 cr. hrs.

Residents provide emergency and comprehensive care. The focus is on more complex cases that frequently involve substantial medical challenges. Prereq: Successfully completed AEGD training.

AEGD 6005. Clinical Advanced General Dentistry 5. 4 cr. hrs.

See AEGD 6004. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Successful completion of AEGD 6001 to 6004.

AEGD 6006. Clinical Advanced General Dentistry 6. 4 cr. hrs.

See AEGD 6004. S/U grade assessment Prereq: Successful completion of AEGD 6001 to 6005.

AEGD 6101. Discipline Topics/Multi-Disciplinary Treatment Planning in Adv. Gen. Dentistry 1. 3 cr. hrs.

Residents develop and present cases evaluated on the quality of the documentation and treatment planning demonstrated. Emphasis placed on developing the ability to diagnose, treatment plan, and problem solve. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Admitted to AEGD program.

AEGD 6102. Discipline Topics/Multi-Disciplinary Treatment Planning in Adv. Gen. Dentistry 2. 3 cr. hrs.

See AEGD 6101. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Admitted to AEGD program.

AEGD 6103. Discipline Topics/Multi-Disciplinary Treatment Planning in Adv. Gen. Dentistry 3. 3 cr. hrs.

See AEGD 6101. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Admitted to AEGD program.

AEGD 6104. Discipline Topics/Multi-Disciplinary Treatment Planning in Adv. Gen. Dentistry 4. 3 cr. hrs.

See AEGD 6101. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Admitted to AEGD program.

Dental Biomaterials Courses

BIMA 6101. Mechanical Behavior of Dental Biomaterials. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic principles of mechanics, elastic deformation, plastic deformation and fracture. Comparison of mechanical behavior of metallic, ceramic and polymer dental biomaterial systems. Discussion of tension, compression, shear, bending, torsion, hardness and impact tests for dental biomaterials. Includes laboratory exercises.

BIMA 6102. Polymeric Dental Biomaterials. 2 cr. hrs.

Compositions and properties of polymers utilized in prosthetic, restorative, orthodontic, preventive, and implant dentistry. The materials include poly (methyl methacrylate), BIS-GMA, polyurethane and polyvinyl products in the form of resins, composites and microfills polymerized by heat, chemicals and ultraviolet or visible lights. Includes laboratory exercises.

BIMA 6151. Dental Cements. 2 cr. hrs.

Compositions, setting reactions and properties of zinc phosphate, zinc oxide-eugenol, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer and resin dental cements. Effects of clinical variables and the ADA specifications related to these materials will be included. May include laboratory exercises.

BIMA 6152. Dental Impression Materials. 2 cr. hrs.

Classification, composition and properties of the various impression materials used in restorative and prosthetic dentistry. The material systems to be discussed include impression compound, hydrocolloids, polysulfides, polyethers and silicones. May include laboratory exercises.

BIMA 6153. Dental Casting Procedures. 3 cr. hrs.

History and development of dental casting procedures. Basic principles and techniques for centrifugal, vacuum and pressure casting. Solidification of metals and classification of porosities. Detailed considerations for casting of noble and base metal dental alloys. Includes laboratory exercises.

BIMA 6201. Dental Metallurgy 1. 3 cr. hrs.

Theory and application of metallurgical principles to the study of dental alloy systems. Dental amalgams, noble and base metal casting alloys, and wrought alloys. Area and extent of study determined by individual needs of student. Includes laboratory exercises.

BIMA 6202. Dental Metallurgy 2. 3 cr. hrs.

See BIMA 6201.

BIMA 6251. Dental Ceramics. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic principles of ceramic structures and properties. History, properties and technology of dental porcelains, gypsum products and dental casting investments. Includes laboratory exercises.

BIMA 6501. Advanced Experimental Techniques for Dental Biomaterials Research 1. 1 cr. hr.

Biomaterials Research 1 laboratory courses. Topics may vary, but will generally include scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing procedures, and X-ray diffraction. Prereq: Admission to graduate program in dental biomaterials.

BIMA 6502. Advanced Experimental Techniques for Dental Biomaterials Research 2. 1 cr. hr.

Biomaterials Research 2 laboratory courses. Topics may vary, but will generally include scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing procedures, and X-ray diffraction. Prereq: Admission to graduate program in dental biomaterials.

BIMA 6570. Biomaterials Science and Engineering. 3 cr. hrs.

Basic and advanced principles of dental biomaterials science. Fundamental scientific principles, and physical, mechanical, chemical and biological properties of restorative and preventive dental biomaterials. Relationships between properties and clinical performance of these materials and methods used for testing them.

BIMA 6601. Dental Biomaterials Literature Review 1. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Discussion of current and classic literature in dental biomaterials. Topics and journals discussed are rotated to provide an overview and range of different materials, properties, and applications. Emphasizes class discussion and presentations. Prereq: Grad. stndg. in BIMA graduate program or cons. of dept.

BIMA 6602. Dental Biomaterials Literature Review 2. 1-3 cr. hrs.

See BIMA 6601. Prereq: Grad. stndg. in BIMA graduate program or cons. of dept.

BIMA 6603. Dental Biomaterials Literature Review 3. 1-3 cr. hrs.

See BIMA 6601. Prereq: Grad. stndg. in BIMA graduate program or cons. of dept.

BIMA 6604. Dental Biomaterials Literature Review 4. 1-3 cr. hrs.

See BIMA 6601. Prereq: Grad. stndg. in BIMA graduate program or cons. of dept.

BIMA 6931. Topics in Dental Biomaterials. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Practical laboratory exercises designed to provide the student with specific skill sets and analytic approaches used in modern materials research.

BIMA 6970. Biomaterials Seminar. 1 cr. hr.

Current topics and concepts in materials science.

BIMA 6980. Teaching Experience in Dental Biomaterials. 1-2 cr. hrs.

Teaching and preclinical laboratory assignments in dental biomaterials for undergraduate dental students.

BIMA 6995. Independent Study in Dental Biomaterials. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Course work customized to meet specific student interests/needs. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

BIMA 6999. Master's Thesis. 1-6 cr. hrs.

Credit hours assigned to thesis preparation and scholarship. S/U grade assessment.

BIMA 9970. Graduate Standing Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

BIMA 9994. Master's Thesis Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

BIMA 9995. Master's Thesis Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

BIMA 9996. Master's Thesis Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

Dentistry Courses

DENT 6000. Clinical Patient Care. 1-7 cr. hrs.

Designed to account for time dental graduate residents spend providing patient care. Ranges from 1-7 credit hours per term. S/U grade assessment.

DENT 6001. Dental Graduate Didactic Core Curriculum 1:. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Section credit hours range from 1-3 for sections comprising 12-36 class hours.

DENT 6002. Dental Graduate Didactic Core Curriculum 2:. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Section credit hours range from 1-3 for sections comprising 12-36 class hours.

DENT 6003. Dental Graduate Didactic Core Curriculum 3:. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Section credit hours range from 1-3 for sections comprising 12-36 class hours.

DENT 6101. Clinical Orthodontics 1. 4 cr. hrs.

Lectures, laboratory and clinical treatment of patients with various types of malocclusion. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6102. Clinical Orthodontics 2. 4 cr. hrs.

Lectures, laboratory and clinical treatment of patients with various types of malocclusion. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6103. Clinical Orthodontics 3. 6 cr. hrs.

Lectures, laboratory and clinical treatment of patients with various types of malocclusion. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6104. Clinical Orthodontics 4. 6 cr. hrs.

Lectures, laboratory and clinical treatment of patients with various types of malocclusion. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6110. Histopathology of Tooth Movement. 1 cr. hr.

Histological and pathological aspects of tooth movement emphasizing tissue response to orthodontic forces. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6171. Orthodontics Seminar 1. 1 cr. hr.

Combines basic/applied techniques and maintenance of normal occlusal development. Students learn the fabrication and biomechanics of various appliances used in prevention and interception of malocclusions. Concurrently, students are taught in the theory of normal occlusal development, diagnosis, prevention, and interception of certain malocclusions. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6172. Orthodontics Seminar 2. 1 cr. hr.

A continuation of a series of courses beginning with DENT 6171. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6173. Orthodontics Seminar 3. 1 cr. hr.

A continuation of a series of courses beginning with DENT 6171. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6174. Orthodontics Seminar 4. 1 cr. hr.

A continuation of a series of courses beginning with DENT 6171. Prereq: Admitted to Orthodontics program.

DENT 6201. Clinical Prosthodontics 1. 4 cr. hrs.

Clinical treatment concepts in basic and advanced restorative procedures. Prereq: Admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6202. Clinical Prosthodontics 2. 4 cr. hrs.

See DENT 6201. Prereq: DENT 6201, and admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6203. Clinical Prosthodontics 3. 4 cr. hrs.

See DENT 6201. Prereq: DENT 6201, DENT 6202, and admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6204. Clinical Prosthodontics 4. 4 cr. hrs.

See DENT 6201. Prereq: DENT 6201, DENT 6202, DENT 6203, and admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6205. Clinical Prosthodontics 5. 6 cr. hrs.

Complete dentures, fixed and removable partial dentures, implant prosthodontics, maxillofacial prosthodontics and associated clinical disciplines of dentistry involved in comprehensive rehabilitation of the oral cavity. Prereq: DENT 6201, DENT 6202, DENT 6203, DENT 6204, and admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6206. Clinical Prosthodontics 6. 6 cr. hrs.

See DENT 6205. Prereq: DENT 6201, DENT 6202, DENT 6203, DENT 6204, DENT 6205, and admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6271. Seminar in Complete Denture Prosthodontics. 1 cr. hr.

In-depth review and discussion of complete denture literature and its theoretical, technical, and clinical application. Includes regularly-scheduled diagnosis and treatment planning sessions in all phases of prosthodontics. Prereq: Admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6272. Seminar in Removable Partial Denture Prosthodontics. 1 cr. hr.

In-depth review and discussion of removable partial dentures literature and its theoretical, technical, and clinical application. Includes regularly-scheduled diagnosis and treatment planning sessions in all phases of prosthodontics. Prereq: Admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6273. Seminar in Fixed Partial Denture Prosthodontics. 1 cr. hr.

In-depth review and discussion of fixed partial denture and rehabilitation literature, and its theoretical, technical, and clinical application. Includes regularly-scheduled diagnosis and treatment planning sessions in all phases of prosthodontics. Prereq: Admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6274. Seminar in Maxillofacial Prosthetics and Related Disciplines. 1 cr. hr.

In-depth literature review and discussion of theoretical, technical, and clinical application of maxillofacial prosthetics, surgical and radiation oncology, speech pathology, and other related disciplines. Includes regularly-scheduled diagnosis and treatment planning sessions in all phases of prosthodontics. Prereq: Admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6275. Seminar in Implant Prosthodontics. 1 cr. hr.

In-depth review and discussion of complete and partial fixed, single tooth and removable implant rehabilitation literature and its theoretical and clinical applications. Includes regularly-scheduled diagnosis and treatment sessions in all phases of prosthodontics. Prereq: Admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6276. Seminar in Occlusion/TMD. 1 cr. hr.

In-depth review and discussion of concepts of occlusion and articulation, occlusal analysis, diagnosis and treatment of facial pain and tempormandibular disorders. Includes regularly-scheduled diagnosis and treatment planning sessions in all phases of prosthodontics. Prereq: Admitted to Prosthodontics program.

DENT 6301. Endodontics Clinic and Case Review 1. 4 cr. hrs.

Complete diagnosis and treatment of clinic cases using all available diagnostic aids and treatment modalities. Endodontic surgical cases to be performed. Clinical cases to be presented for discussion. Prereq: Admitted to Endodontics program.

DENT 6302. Endodontics Clinic and Case Review 2. 4 cr. hrs.

See DENT 6301. Prereq: Admitted to Endodontics program.

DENT 6303. Endodontics Clinic and Case Review 3. 6 cr. hrs.

See DENT 6301. Prereq: Admitted to Endodontics program.

DENT 6304. Endodontics Clinic and Case Review 4. 6 cr. hrs.

See DENT 6301. Prereq: Admitted to Endodontics program.

DENT 6371. Endodontics Literature and Book Review 1. 1 cr. hr.

Discussion of current and classic literature, library research; review current textbooks, conventions and dental meetings. Some lectures by graduate students relating endodontics to the other disciplines, systemic health, and potential areas of research. Prereq: Admitted to Endodontics program.

DENT 6372. Endodontics Literature and Book Review 2. 1 cr. hr.

See DENT 6371. Prereq: Admitted to Endodontics program.

DENT 6373. Endodontics Literature and Book Review 3. 1 cr. hr.

See DENT 6371. Prereq: Admitted to Endodontics program.

DENT 6374. Endodontics Literature and Book Review 4. 1 cr. hr.

See DENT 6371. Prereq: Admitted to Endodontics program.

DENT 6501. Seminar in Geriatric Dentistry. 1 cr. hr.

Designed for dental residents. Emphasis is on patient assessment including social/psychological aspects, patient management including advocacy/referral, and the interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary aspects of patient care.

DENT 6980. Teaching Experience in Dentistry. 1 cr. hr.

Assigned teaching duties in the didactic, preclinical, and clinical dental sciences.

DENT 6995. Independent Study in Dentistry. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Customized to meet specific student interests/needs. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

DENT 6999. Master's Thesis. 1-6 cr. hrs.

Credit hours assigned to thesis preparation and scholarship. S/U grade assessment.

DENT 9970. Graduate Standing Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

DENT 9994. Master's Thesis Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

DENT 9995. Master's Thesis Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

DENT 9996. Master's Thesis Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

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