Chairperson: James A. Marten, Ph.D.
Department of History website

Degrees Offered

Master of Arts, Plan B only; Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

History includes politics, economics, and aesthetics, as well as social, spiritual and cultural relations—our past, our present and our potential as human beings. The history graduate program, mindful of the discipline’s manifold importance and application, offers master of arts and doctoral degree programs in breadth and depth.

Graduate study in history permits students to increase their knowledge of the past and the processes that have shaped the human experience. Such study may prepare students for careers in scholarship, teaching or certain public service fields.

Prerequisites for Admission

For admission to the master of arts program, an applicant must have an undergraduate major in history or a closely related field. An applicant for the doctoral program must possess a master of arts in history.

Application Deadline

To be considered for admission, all application requirements must be completed and received in the Graduate School by the first Monday of the spring term. For students seeking to matriculate in fall 2016, that date is January 11, 2016.

Application Requirements

Applicants must submit, directly to the Graduate School:

  1. A completed application form and fee online.
  2. Official transcripts from all current and previous colleges/universities except Marquette.
  3. A one-page statement of purpose specifying proposed areas of study and academic interests.
  4. Three letters of recommendation from former teachers.
  5. GRE scores (General Test only).
  6. (For doctoral applicants only) a writing sample. Ideally, the sample should be the master’s thesis, but, for graduates of non-thesis programs, it may consist of a formal seminar paper.
  7. (For international applicants only) a TOEFL score or other acceptable proof of English proficiency.

General Information

Direction and Advising

The director of graduate studies is charged with directing the department’s graduate programs and with the general advising of all graduate students in matters of course selection, financial aid and placement. In addition, each student chooses, in consultation with the director of graduate studies, a field adviser who will direct the student’s field-specific work, including: the master’s essay, the selection of post-master’s course work, completion of the Doctoral Program Planning Form and the doctoral dissertation.

Degrees Overview

Students begin with the course HIST 6100 The Art and Craft of History, which provides not only methodological and epistemological approaches, but also introduces students to professors who discuss their specific interests and fields. Master of arts candidates concentrate major/minor fields in American, European (including medieval), or global histories in their 30 hours of course work. They must also pass comprehensive examinations and submit a master’s essay to fulfill degree requirements. The doctoral program offers degrees with a focus in European or United States histories. Doctoral candidates must have a master’s degree and normally complete 60 hours of course work beyond the bachelor’s. They must also pass a foreign language examination and written and oral doctoral qualifying exams in major and minor fields. Candidates attain the doctorate with the composition and defense of a book-length dissertation.

History Master's Requirements

Specializations: European History, United States History, Global Studies

The three major areas in the master of arts program with their fields are:

  1. European History
    • Medieval
    • Early Modern
    • Modern
  2. United States History
    • Early U.S.
    • Modern U.S.
  3. Global Studies

A master’s student must complete 30 credit hours of course work, a master’s essay and a comprehensive examination. At least 18 credit hours of course work must be in history courses numbered 6000 or above, and at least six of those credits must be in research seminars. With the consent of the department chairperson, six hours of graduate work outside the department may be included in the master of arts program. Students in Medieval history will be examined only in that field but must take at least six credit hours of graduate work in another field. No foreign language is required for the master’s degree.

Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive written examination lasts nine hours. A committee of two examiners will assess the master of arts candidate’s command of the fields of study and knowledge of historical literature. Students in U.S. and European history will be examined in one major field and one minor field chosen from within the three major areas of study according to their regional and chronological emphases. Students in Medieval history will be examined in the Medieval field alone. Students in Global Studies will be examined in this broadly-focused major field. They must also select a minor field from among four options: Latin America, Asia, Africa or Atlantic World.

History Doctoral Requirements

Specializations: European History, United States History

The two major areas in the doctoral program and subfields are:

  1. European History
    • Early Modern
    • Modern
  2. United States History
    • Early U.S.
    • Modern U.S.

Qualifying examinations, both written and oral, will be taken in both fields of the student's major area.  The oral component of the examination may also address the student's topical research field.

In addition to the exams in the major fields, the doctoral student fulfills requirements for a research and a teaching field as defined in departmental guidelines and subject to the approval of the Graduate Committee.

A doctoral student must complete a program of study defined on an approved Doctoral Program Planning Form. The program includes course work, a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language, the qualifying examination and a dissertation.

Course Work

The department’s normal course work requirement for the doctoral program is 60 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree, including course work for the master of arts but not including the 12 credit hours required for the doctoral dissertation. In the 60 credits required, a student with a master of arts must include six credit hours of research seminar courses and a three-hour dissertation seminar. The academic progress of all students who hold non-Marquette master’s degrees will be evaluated at the end of the first year of doctoral study. The programs of students making unsatisfactory progress may be terminated at that time.

Foreign Language Requirement

The student must have knowledge of at least one foreign language pertinent to their area of research. Reading skills in foreign languages are assessed by the department. Students may also satisfy their foreign language competency requirement by achieving at least a B in a 6204 course offered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Satisfactory competence in the foreign language must be demonstrated prior to the qualifying examinations, and students in continental European history must demonstrate command of the language appropriate to their research goals no later than the end of their first term of doctoral study. Failure to do so will preclude further course work until the student demonstrates the appropriate language competency. The dissertation director may require a doctoral student to show competence in a second foreign language or in statistical methods when the dissertation topic requires it.

Qualifying Examination

After completing all formal course work and language study, the doctoral student must take the doctoral qualifying examinations (DQEs), written and oral, in their major fields. Written qualifying examinations are nine hours in duration.  Oral qualifying examinations, two hours in duration, are held about ten days after the written examinations.

The qualifying examination will cover either European (early modern and modern) or United States History (from exploration and settlement to the present).  A committee of three department members assesses examination performance on the complete exam (written and oral components).  A unanimous vote is required to pass the exam.

Courses

HIST 5100. Public History. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the means by which the skills and methods of history are applied by professionals outside the classroom. Topics include public history as a sub-discipline of history, historic preservation, and the emergence of history museums and historical societies.

HIST 5101. Applied History. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of technologies for researching, presenting and preserving of historical materials. How to apply historic methods through digital media technologies. Topics will include systems and tools for: researching and collecting documents and materials; digitizing, editing and manipulating materials; presenting content to local and distant audiences; and preserving materials in appropriate formats. Investigates digital imaging, multimedia and Web page creation, streaming technologies, presentations systems and CD/DVD production. Also explores the unique capabilities of collaboration and distribution over high-speed networks (Internet2). Requirements include a final project on a historical topic that incorporates some or all of the technologies introduced, demonstrating mastery of content as well as technology.

HIST 5113. American Foreign Relations 1. 3 cr. hrs.

American foreign relations from the American Revolution to the emergence of the United States as a world power. Gives equal emphasis to the conduct of American diplomacy by agents of the U.S. government and the social, economic, and cultural forces that shape foreign policies.

HIST 5114. American Foreign Relations 2. 3 cr. hrs.

American foreign relations from the American Revolution to the emergence of the United States as a world power. Gives equal emphasis to the conduct of American diplomacy by agents of the U.S. government and the social, economic, and cultural forces that shape foreign policies. Begins with World War I.

HIST 5115. The American West. 3 cr. hrs.

American westward expansion from colonial days to the 20th century, emphasizing the impact of the frontier on the development of American culture and institutions.

HIST 5120. American Immigration. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of migration to the United States (and Britain's North American colonies) that explores how immigrants have built communities, sought economic security and experienced cultural change. Addresses anti-immigrant sentiment, race construction and notions of cultural pluralism. Contextualizes immigration--an issue central to American identity--within a transnational framework of global labor markets, American incursions overseas and the worldwide movement of peoples.

HIST 5130. Religion and American Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey the historical impact of religious belief and institutions on the intellectual, cultural, and public life of the United States.

HIST 5135. African-American History. 3 cr. hrs.

The role and response of the African-American in American society. Emphasis on the problems of slavery, exclusion, accommodation, migration, urbanization, and currents of protest.

HIST 5140. American Urban History. 3 cr. hrs.

History of the American city from the colonial era to the present. Topics include the economic, political, and cultural effects of cities on American society, as well as America's philosophical and moral response to urbanization.

HIST 5145. A History of Women in America. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the history of women and the variety of women's experiences in America from pre-European contact to the present. The historical construction of gender and the ways that diverse women have shaped and contested their various experiences as mothers, daughters, wives, and partners; as farmers and workers; as slaves and conquered peoples; as reformers and political activists; and as immigrants and citizens are analyzed.

HIST 5150. Childhood in America. 3 cr. hrs.

The history of children and childhood in the United States from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on child rearing, race, gender, class, and popular culture.

HIST 5155. A History of Native America. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of Native American history from 1491 (before Columbus’s “Discovery”) to the present. Explores the diverse cultures and histories of indigenous peoples in the present-day United States, and focuses on particular themes such as colonization and decolonization, settler colonialism, intimacy and violence, removal and “survivance,” assimilation and allotment, along with sovereignty and self-determination. Grapples with contemporary issues related to Native mascots, treaties, casinos, cultural representation, and more.

HIST 5160. Cultural and Intellectual History of the United States. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of American thought and culture from the first contacts between indigenous peoples and Europeans, through the development of the United States to the present. Particular attention paid to those moments of intellectual and cultural conflict that illuminate and define the process by which a variety of Americans have shaped a distinct but malleable American culture.

HIST 5210. The Black Death. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the 14th Century global pandemic as a case study for examining its social, political, and cultural impact on medieval societies. Investigates the relationship between the spread of plague and the physical environment, as well as assesses how modern scientific knowledge impacts our understanding of the event.

HIST 5212. The Crusades. 3 cr. hrs.

Western European and Middle Eastern relations from the 11th through the 13th centuries; includes Arabic, Byzantine, Turkish, and Mongol areas.

HIST 5245. Women in Western Civilization. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of women's experiences in western civilization from prehistory to the present. Focusing primarily on Europe, analyzes the changing roles and responsibilities of women in the family, in the work force, and in the community and highlights the impact of phenomena such as religion, science, technology, and democracy on the shifting perceptions and definitions of gender in western civilization.

HIST 5247. Comparative Home Fronts during the Second World War. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores state policies, gender ideologies, daily realities and the role(s) of civilians, particularly women, on select home fronts of World War II. The conflict was a "watershed" in the use of violence aimed at civilians, who were targeted via air raids, food blockades, deportation, rape and mass murder. Using comparative framework, examines Germany, Italy, France, the concentration camps and the United States.

HIST 5249. Intellectual History of Modern Europe. 3 cr. hrs.

The lives and works of prominent European scientists, philosophers and artists from the Enlightenment to the present.

HIST 5250. Tudor England: 1485 to 1603. 3 cr. hrs.

The political, socio-economic, religious and cultural developments in Renaissance and Reformation England with particular attention to the personalities who dominate the Tudor court; the effects of the establishment of Caesaro-Papism by Henry VIII upon the art, architecture, literature and social life of the country.

HIST 5251. War and Revolution in Britain: 1603-1815. 3 cr. hrs.

Focuses on Britain's development as a constitutional monarchy and a commercial and imperial power. Particular attention is given to the Civil War, Glorious Revolution, American Revolution, and escalating rivalry with France climaxing in the Napoleonic Wars.

HIST 5252. Modern Britain. 3 cr. hrs.

Focuses on the democratization of Britain, the creation of the welfare state, and erosion of Victorian Britain's commercial and political global primacy reflected in the disintegration of the British Empire and fragmentation of the United Kingdom.

HIST 5255. The British Empire. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the creation, expansion and dismantling of the world's largest empire from the 16th century to the present. Exploration of political, social, economic and cultural factors. Emphasis on contrasting the views and experiences of Britons and of natives of various colonized areas.

HIST 5260. Modern Ireland. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of the political and cultural history of Ireland since the Gratton Parliament, focusing upon the dual legacy of constitutional and revolutionary nationalism in Irish life.

HIST 5262. Modern France. 3 cr. hrs.

France from the fall of Napoleon to the present, especially emphasizing the development of French democracy and the nation's enduring impact on world affairs.

HIST 5264. Modern Germany. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the major political, cultural, social and intellectual developments in modern Germany history since the Napoleonic period. Topics include: nationalism, unification, the German (Wilhelmine) Empire, the Weimar Republic, the rise of the Nazi Party, the Third Reich, the two World Wars, division, reunification and Germany's post-reunification role in Europe.

HIST 5266. Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. 3 cr. hrs.

Overview of the history of Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945. Primarily focuses on the origins and development of the Holocaust and the attempted genocide of the Jews of Europe. Concentrates on the conception and implementation of Nazi extermination policies in German-occupied Europe during World War II, paying attention to both ideological and practical aspects of the “Final Solution.”.

HIST 5270. Russia to 1861. 3 cr. hrs.

The Slavs, the Kievan Rus Empire, the Mongol invasion, the rise of Muscovy, and the Russian empire of Peter the Great and his successors down to the emancipation of the serfs in 1861.

HIST 5271. The Russian Revolution and the Soviet Union. 3 cr. hrs.

Pre-revolutionary Russia from 1861, the Revolution of 1917, Soviet economic growth and totalitarianism, and the emergence of the USSR as a world power and its subsequent collapse.

HIST 5290. The French Revolution and Napoleon: 1787 to 1815. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of Revolutionary Europe with emphasis on the causes and consequences of the Revolution, the Reign of Terror, the counter-revolutionary movements, the conquest of Europe, and the relation between revolution and religion.

HIST 5298. The Cold War. 3 cr. hrs.

The origins, nature and consequences of the Cold War, with emphasis on the 1945-1970 period. Topics include the continuing effects of the Cold War, prospects for new international rivalries, and the domestic consequences of the Cold War.

HIST 5310. Colonial Latin America. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the creation of “Latin America” as a result of Spanish and Portuguese colonialism in the Americas, from the late fifteenth through the eighteenth century. Focuses on the meeting points of distinctly different cultures (primarily Amerindian, European and African); the often violent insertion of the Americas into the early modern global economy; and some of the legacies of Latin America's colonial experience in the modern world.

HIST 5320. United States-Latin American Relations. 3 cr. hrs.

Analyzes the symbiotic relationship between the United States and Latin America from 1776 to the present, focusing on the key themes of race, colonialism, resistance, transculturation, dependency, revolution, the drug trade and immigration. Examines how the United States' changing global status has affected its political, economic and cultural relationship with other countries in the Americas.

HIST 5350. The Caribbean. 3 cr. hrs.

Focuses on the contours of Caribbean history, 1400 to present. Examines Native American culture, colonialism, slavery, international trade, the politics of independence, economic development, national identity, and ethnicity.

HIST 5355. History of Mexico. 3 cr. hrs.

Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present, with emphasis on ancient civilizations, the conquest, colonial society, independence, nineteenth-century development, Porfirian dictatorship, the Revolution of 1910, and modern society since 1920.

HIST 5450. North Africa. 3 cr. hrs.

North Africa from the 7th century to the present, emphasizing Islamic and European influences.

HIST 5460. Modern South Africa. 3 cr. hrs.

Survey of the major political, economic and social developments in modern South African history since the Dutch settlement to the present. Topics include: European settlement and colonization, mineral discoveries and their impact, industrialization and social change, the establishment of the apartheid system, African resistance and post-apartheid South African society. Particular attention is given to how the state-dictated system of racial segregation and discrimination affected the lived experience of South Africa’s diverse population.

HIST 5500. Modern Japan. 3 cr. hrs.

Major events, people and debates in Japanese history from 1800 to the present. Includes examinations of the "margins" of Japanese history: the countryside, the common people, ethnic minorities, marginal identities, etc., in order to understand how individuals dealt with changes in Japan from its early modernity to the present day.

HIST 5525. Age of the Samurai. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the basic themes in pre-1900 Japanese history, in particular, the time when Japan was ruled by samurai. Topics include: the rise of the military government, regional and global interaction, as well as changes in culture, economy and society throughout ancient, medieval and early modern Japan. Also examines modern-day issues.

HIST 5550. Medieval East Asia. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the tremendous flourishing of Chinese and Japanese cultures between the 7th and 14th centuries and the influence Mongol conquests played on the diffusion of these cultures to the west.

HIST 5555. Modern China. 3 cr. hrs.

The history of China from 1800-1976, emphasizing national responses to imperial decline, western intervention, civil wars, foreign occupation and political turmoil.

HIST 5600. Comparative Twentieth-Century Genocides. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the emergence, development, underlying causes and uses of genocide, ethnic cleansing and the other crimes against humanity in the twentieth century. Case studies include colonial genocides; the Armenian genocide; the Holocaust; the Cambodian genocide; the Rwandan genocide; and the ethnic cleansings in the former Yugoslavia. Explores responses to these crimes, denial and memory, justice and redress and strategies of prevention and intervention.

HIST 5931. Topics in History. 3 cr. hrs.

Topics vary. Subjects to be announced.

HIST 5953. Readings in History. 3 cr. hrs.

Readings and discussion designed to introduce a small group to topics, problems and methodologies in history which are not taught in the regular lecture courses. Subjects to be announced.

HIST 5986. Internship in History. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Professional experience outside of the classroom in public history editorial, teaching, public service, research, and digital humanities. Students must arrange the internship in consultation with the department chair or designate. Students work three hours per week per credit hour and submit an annotated time sheet and 3-5 page reflection paper on the work experience at the end of the term. S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch. or designate.

HIST 6100. The Art and Craft of History. 3 cr. hrs.

The nature and theories of history, principles and methodologies of historical research, specializations within the discipline, and the professional applications of history. Required of all entering M.A. and Ph.D. students.

HIST 6110. The British Atlantic World to the American Revolution. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the expansion of the English empire to North America. Topics include: exploration; colony founding; the political, social and economic maturation of the colonies; the imperial system including resistance to Parliamentary laws; relations with native populations; the development of slavery; changing roles for women; and the inter-colonial wars between the English and French Empires.

HIST 6115. The American Revolution and the New Nation. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the creation and development of the United States to the beginnings of the sectional conflict. Topics include: the causes of the rebellion; conflicts between Americans; the war for independence; constitution making; foreign relations including the War of 1812; the roles of and the relations between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches under the constitution of 1787; westward expansion and Indian removal; the problem of slavery in national politics; and the political, social, and economic maturation of the new nation.

HIST 6120. The Sectional Conflict, Civil War Era and Gilded Age. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the origins and conduct of the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the political, economic, and social transformation of the United States in the late 19th century. Topics include: the political, constitutional, economic, and moral contexts of the institution of slavery; slave life and race relations; territorial expansion, the development of the West, and Native American policy; the political, social, and economic impact of the Civil War and reconstruction; the development of an American foreign policy; the evolution of political parties; industrialization, urbanization, and immigration.

HIST 6125. United States in the Twentieth Century. 3 cr. hrs.

An examination of the political, economic, and social history of the 20th century. Topics include: the United States' rise to global power; the Progressive Era; the Great Depression; the Cold War and its related conflicts; cultural, social, and intellectual currents; the expansion of the federal government; and the evolution of political parties.

HIST 6235. Medieval Europe. 3 cr. hrs.

A guided reading program on the major issues and historiography of Europe between Late Antiquity and the beginnings of Early Modern Europe.

HIST 6240. Early Modern Europe. 3 cr. hrs.

A guided reading program on the major issues and historiography of Europe between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries.

HIST 6245. Nineteenth-Century Europe. 3 cr. hrs.

A guided reading program on the major issues and historiography of Europe during the "long" nineteenth-century.

HIST 6250. Twentieth-Century Europe. 3 cr. hrs.

A guided reading program on the major issues and historiography of 20th-century Europe.

HIST 6300. Global History. 3 cr. hrs.

A guided reading program on the major issues, methodologies, and historiography in global history.

HIST 6500. Studies in United States History. 3 cr. hrs.

Topics may vary.

HIST 6510. Studies in Medieval History. 3 cr. hrs.

HIST 6520. Studies in Early Modern History. 3 cr. hrs.

Lectures and discussions in an area which, because of its topicality, is not the subject of a regular course.

HIST 6525. Studies in European History. 3 cr. hrs.

HIST 6530. Studies in Latin American History. 3 cr. hrs.

HIST 6535. Studies in African History. 3 cr. hrs.

HIST 6540. Studies in Asian History. 3 cr. hrs.

HIST 6545. Studies in Global History. 3 cr. hrs.

HIST 6954. Seminar in History. 3 cr. hrs.

Research seminar designed to allow graduate students to engage in independent scholarship within a topical field.

HIST 6995. Independent Study in History. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Cons. of instr. and cons. of graduate prog. dir.

HIST 6999. Master's Thesis. 1-6 cr. hrs.

S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 8960. Dissertation Seminar. 3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Doctoral stndg.

HIST 8995. Independent Study in History. 1-3 cr. hrs.

A course whose mode of instruction offers a student the opportunity to study or do in-depth research on a topic or subject matter not usually offered in the established curriculum, with a current Marquette faculty of his/her choice and independent of the classroom setting. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 8999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 cr. hrs.

S/U grade assessment.

HIST 9970. Graduate Standing Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9974. Graduate Fellowship: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9975. Graduate Assistant Teaching: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9976. Graduate Assistant Research: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9984. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9985. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9986. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9987. Doctoral Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9988. Doctoral Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9989. Doctoral Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9994. Master's Thesis Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9995. Master's Thesis Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9996. Master's Thesis Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9997. Doctoral Dissertation Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9998. Doctoral Dissertation Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

HIST 9999. Doctoral Dissertation Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.