Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research: Sarah Feldner, Ph.D.
Graduate Communication website

Degrees Offered

Master of Arts; Certificate

Program Description

The J. William and Mary Diederich College of Communication graduate program in communication prepares students for intellectual, artistic, professional and ethical leadership in a complex technological and multicultural world. It uses a core of common knowledge, values, and communication skills to improve understanding of communication as a cultural and social process and to develop the skills necessary for success in constantly changing information environments. Students can specialize in one of two areas: communication professions and society, or digital communication strategies. The master’s program takes an integrative approach that emphasizes how contemporary communication practices, technologies and professions intersect, and encourages students to learn from one another’s specialized interests. 

The communication professions and society specialization focuses upon deeper skills of analysis and research in communication and prepares students for advanced roles in their careers or for doctoral studies. The digital communication strategies specialization focuses upon the planning and use of communication technologies and prepares students to work as leaders in their professional fields.

Students are encouraged to tailor the degree to their individual interests by choosing from the varied proseminars or topics courses offered in communication, or from courses offered in other Marquette graduate programs, including business, marketing, English, psychology, and political science.

Both specializations require a problem-based, interdisciplinary, organizationally grounded fieldwork experience. Milwaukee offers a rich urban laboratory for communication study, with a wide array of advertising and public relations agencies, major corporations, consulting firms, broadcast stations, general interest and specialized newspapers and magazines, and online publications. The fieldwork credits allow students to gain experience and develop a professional portfolio, and to work collaboratively and learn from one another’s experiences as writers, designers, multi-media specialists, consultants, trainers and marketers.

Upon the completion of the master of arts degree program in communication, graduates will be able to:

  1. Apply research-based, theory-informed knowledge to the identification and solution of real-life issues in the field.
  2. Apply ethical decision-making skills in a variety of communication situations.
  3. Integrate knowledge from the discipline of communication with the chosen specialization area.

Prerequisites for Admission

For all master of arts and certificate programs in communication, the applicant must have graduated with, or be about to graduate with, a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and must have an undergraduate grade point average equivalent to at least a 3.000 on a 4.000 scale. Master of arts applicants without sufficient academic or professional background will be required to take some undergraduate courses with no graduate credit to satisfy deficiencies.

Application Requirements

Applicants must submit, directly to the Graduate School:

  1. A completed application form and fee online.
  2. Official transcripts from all current and previous colleges/universities except Marquette.
  3. Three letters of recommendation, specifically in letter format.
  4. A brief statement of academic and professional goals.
  5. (For M.A. applicants only) GRE scores (General Test only).
  6. (For international applicants only) a TOEFL score or other acceptable proof of English proficiency. A minimum score of 600 on the paper-based version, 250 on the computer-based version, or 100 on the Internet-based version is required.

Master of Arts in Corporate Communication

In addition to our master of arts in communication, the J. William and Mary Diederich College of Communication offers a master of arts in corporate communication in conjunction with the Graduate School of Management. This 30 credit-hour program combines advanced course work in communication and business to prepare students for an executive-level communication role. For more information on the corporate communication master of arts and its related five-year accelerated degree program, see the Graduate School of Management bulletin.

Dual Programs of Study

M.A. in Communication and M.A. in Political Science
M.A. in Communication and M.A. in International Affairs

The J. William and Mary Diederich College of Communication, in conjunction with the Department of Political Science, offers a program of dual study leading to a master of arts degree in communication and a master of arts degree in political science or international affairs. Dual degree students are able to complete both degree programs in less time than if both degrees were pursued separately.

Students seeking admission into the dual degree program must submit to the Graduate School separate applications for admission to both programs, including two sets of required documentation, and must meet the admission requirements of each program. Acceptance into one program does not guarantee acceptance into the other. If a student is accepted into one program and not the other, the student can still choose to accept the admission offer from the first program but would not be considered a dual degree student. Because students are officially admitted into only one Marquette University graduate program at a time, applicants must indicate which program they intend to pursue and complete first, although once accepted for admission to both programs, students may take courses from both departments. Upon completion of the first program, the student will be officially admitted to the second program for completion of the remainder of the dual program.

Dual degree students count 9 credits of course work in each program toward the required course work credits of the other program. Thus, 9 of the 30 credits required for the thesis program, or 9 of the 36 credits required for the non-thesis program for the master of arts degree in communication will come from POSC courses, and 9 of the 30 credits required for the master of arts degree in political science or international affairs will come from COMM courses.

 

Communication Master's Requirements

Specializations: Communication Professions and Society, Digital Communication Strategies

Students are required to choose a specialization and have the option of completing a thesis program or a non-thesis program. All students are admitted to the thesis program (Plan A), but may transfer to the non-thesis program (Plan B) with the approval of the program director. Students must earn a grade point average of at least 3.000 with no grades below a C. 

Thesis Program (Plan A)

Students must complete 24 credit hours of course work plus 6 credit hours of thesis work (a total of 30 credit hours). Students must also submit an approved thesis and are required to give an oral defense of their thesis.  

Non-Thesis Program (Plan B)

All students are admitted to the thesis program (Plan A), but may transfer to the non-thesis program (Plan B) with the approval of the program director.

Non-thesis program students must complete 30 credit hours of course work, 3 credit hours of practicum and 3 credit hours of an approved professional project (a total of 36 credit hours).

Program Requirements  

Thesis (Plan A) Requirements:

COMM 6001Communication Theory in Context3
COMM 6002Communication Research in Action3
COMM 6250Communication as Ethical Practice3
Specialization courses (see details below)12
Elective 1, 23
Thesis6
Total Credit Hours30
1

The elective may include any course at the 5000 level or above including communication professions and society proseminars and digital communication strategies courses. Students may also choose courses in other departments selected in consultation with advisers.

2

Students may choose to take COMM 6964 Communication Practicum for elective credit.  COMM 6964 Communication Practicum may be repeated for up to 6 credits.

Non-Thesis (Plan B) Requirements:      

COMM 6001Communication Theory in Context3
COMM 6002Communication Research in Action3
COMM 6250Communication as Ethical Practice3
COMM 6964Communication Practicum3
Specialization courses (see details below)12
Electives 1, 29
Professional Project3
Total Credit Hours36
1

Electives may include any course at the 5000 level or above including communication professions and society proseminars and digital communication strategies courses. Students may also choose courses in other departments selected in consultation with advisers.

2

Students may choose to take COMM 6964 Communication Practicum for elective credit.  COMM 6964 Communication Practicum may be repeated for up to 6 credits.

Specialization Details

Communication Professions and Society

This specialization provides students with the theoretical and methodological foundation needed for positions of intellectual leadership in communication professions, or for doctoral studies. The proseminar format encourages students to discover their individual interests within a broad spectrum of communication concepts, theories, and research methods.

The proseminars are organized under six important contemporary topics; their exact content and title will vary depending upon term and instructor. Proseminars may be repeated under different titles.

To complete the communication professions and society specialization, students must choose 4 proseminars from the following list. Each course has variable topics and may be repeated once; however, students must complete courses in at least 3 areas.

COMM 6953Proseminar in Health, Science and Environment3
COMM 6954Proseminar in Media3
COMM 6955Proseminar in Organizations3
COMM 6956Proseminar in Public Life3
COMM 6957Proseminar in Relationships3
COMM 6958Proseminar in Technology3

Digital Communication Strategies

This specialization provides students with the conceptual foundation and practical training they need to help organizations plan and execute effective digital communication strategies. Courses help students identify and plan communication strategy, develop digital content, and measure the effectiveness of communication messages within a variety of professional contexts, including advertising, public relations, and journalism. Students may tailor their course selections to meet their professional needs and interests.

The digital communication strategies specialization offers topic-based courses that take an applied approach to the strategic use of digital communication technologies. Specific titles vary, depending upon term and instructor, and topics courses may be repeated under different titles.

To complete the digital communication strategies specialization, students choose 4 courses from the following list. Each course has variable topics and may be repeated once; however, students must complete courses in at least 3 areas.

COMM 6810Digital Communication Strategies for Content3
COMM 6815Digital Communication Strategies in Metrics3
COMM 6820Digital Communication Strategies for Technologies3
COMM 6825Digital Communication Strategies for Leadership3

Accelerated Bachelor’s-Master’s Program

The accelerated degree program in the College of Communication allows Marquette University students to earn both a bachelor of arts degree with a major in digital media, advertising, communication studies, corporate communication, journalism, media studies, public relations or performing arts and a master of arts degree in communication in five years. Students will complete 9-12 hours of approved graduate credit in communication during their senior undergraduate year that count as part of the undergraduate credit hour requirement.  

Upon completion of the first term as a master's candidate, the student must petition the Graduate School to transfer the courses taken as an undergraduate to the master's degree. All remaining master's degree requirements may be completed during the subsequent summer, fall and spring terms.

Candidates for admission should have undergraduate junior status, have completed at least 3 upper-division communication courses and should have a communication GPA of at least 3.500. Candidates for admission should submit transcripts and three letters of recommendation, but need not submit GRE scores. Candidates for admission to this program should notify the associate dean for graduate programs of their intentions.


 

Digital Storytelling Certificate

The J. William and Mary Diederich College of Communication also offers a 15 credit hour graduate certificate in digital storytelling. The certificate is for those who want to understand the theoretical foundation of storytelling, apply it to the various disciplines in communication, and learn the applied skills in multimedia technology that enable them to be competitive in the converged job market. Students who complete the certificate learn different types of storytelling, such as informational, persuasive, and historical, and different forms of storytelling, such as public affairs journalism, fundraising, advertising, public relations, entertainment, as well as family stories. Students also learn different means for doing storytelling through documentaries, blogs, websites, print media, etc. The certificate can stand alone or can be applied toward the master’s degree in communication for students admitted to the degree program.

Certificate Requirements

The certificate in digital storytelling requires the completion of three required courses (9 credit hours) and two elective courses (6 credit hours) for a total of 15 credit hours. Students should consult their adviser or the associate dean for graduate studies and research when deciding upon electives.

Required Courses:
COMM 6850The Craft of Digital Storytelling3
COMM 6900Storytelling in Public Life3
COMM 6997Capstone in Digital Storytelling3
Elective Courses: Complete two courses from the following.6
Digital Communication Strategies for Content
Digital Communication Strategies in Metrics
Digital Communication Strategies for Technologies
Digital Communication Strategies for Leadership
Total Credit Hours15

Note:
No more than 6 credits from the master of arts in communication may be counted toward the certificate in digital storytelling.

Advertising & Public Relations Courses

ADPR 5200. Business to Business Marketing Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of how businesses promote their goods and services to other businesses. Examines products, markets, objectives, strategies, media techniques and evaluation. Covers advertising, public relations, direct marketing and sales promotion. Includes case studies, outside speakers and field trips.

ADPR 5300. Emerging and Social Media in a Dynamic Marketplace. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the strategic uses, impact and implications of emerging and social media. Addresses the need to adapt to a digital, networked marketplace where change is the rule rather than the exception. Expands student knowledge of emerging and social media and their application to advertising and public relations challenges. Students use this knowledge to find more strategic and effective ways to communicate with clients, publics, target markets and other stakeholders.

ADPR 5500. Advertising and Public Relations Account Management. 3 cr. hrs.

The fundamentals of management in both the client and agency environments. Analyzes client and agency structures and functions. Explores project estimating, budgeting and time management. Examines account profitability maintenance and account team productivity. Reviews techniques for agency and supplier selection. Special emphasis on the ethical aspects of account work.

ADPR 5600. International Advertising and Public Relations. 3 cr. hrs.

Students develop knowledge and skills related to strategic communications within a global marketplace. A variety of topics are addressed including the role of culture in global communication, differences in styles of communication across international groups and the role brands play in this process. Content explores culture as it applies to advertising and public relations directed at different international audiences and globalization, while keeping in mind the importance of ethics and social responsibility.

ADPR 5850. Mobile Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines current usage trends, mobile marketing and the future of digital and mobile communication. Students learn how brands face the challenge of creatively integrating mobile tactics into their digital brand strategies through examination of case studies and contemporary best practices. Students learn how to conduct ethnographic research in an effort to understand how consumers engage with mobile devices. They explore the use of agile, human-centered, EX <user experience> design for prototyping, evaluating mobile websites and testing mobile applications to develop mobile marketing strategies that creatively integrate mobile-based tactics.

ADPR 5951. MU Led Travel/Study Abroad. 3 cr. hrs.

Designed to bring advertising and culture to life within the context of the global marketplace. Students spend three weeks in both London and Prague, visit local and multinational advertising agencies and media companies, and experience local culture. Course taught in an international setting by Marquette professors and where students earn Marquette credit. Study Abroad expenses apply. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

ADPR 5953. Seminar in Advertising and Public Relations. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Specific subjects of seminars to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Variable topics.

Communication Studies Courses

CMST 5110. Family Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces communication phenomena in the family setting. Examines how communication affects the development, maintenance, and enhancement of family relations.

CMST 5120. Gender and Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the relationship between gender and communication. Includes discussion of verbal and nonverbal communication patterns of males and females, various explanations for these patterns, perceptions of gender differences and the implications these perceptions have for people in several contexts (public, interpersonal, and organizational).

CMST 5130. Communication and Urban Families. 3 cr. hrs.

Investigates communication about urban families, the communication links between urban families and institutions, and communication practices within urban families. Emphasizes the diversity among urban families as well as the stressors and strengths found in the urban context. Prereq: CMST 1000.

CMST 5140. Intergenerational Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Focuses on communication theories and the role of communication in intergenerational interactions within a wide variety of contexts including: interpersonal, workplace, familial, health, and mediated technology.

CMST 5220. Communication Approaches to Training and Development. 3 cr. hrs.

Emphasizes development of training sessions within organizations. Diagnostic methods for assessing needs and determining the utility of specific training are explored. Roles of consultant, in-house human resource trainer, and liaison with subject matter experts are differentiated. Students develop training modules for communication skills training.

CMST 5230. Managerial Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Looks in-depth at the unique and challenging circumstances which affect communication between managers and their employees as well as at a number of theories and strategies for improving communication in the workplace.

CMST 5250. Leadership and Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores communication variables involved when leaders attempt to influence members to achieve a goal. Topics include: power, credibility, motivation, research on leader traits, styles and situations, and current models of leadership such as transactional, transformational, charismatic, and functional approaches. Also explores the different leadership challenges posed by community and institutional settings.

CMST 5260. Communication Technologies in the Workplace. 3 cr. hrs.

Presents a historical and theoretical review of the impact of new communication technologies on organizations and their membership. Focuses on the organizational, social and communicative implications of new communication technologies across a broad range of contexts in the organizational setting, including interpersonal, groups and teams, management, and technological innovations. Includes some special topics particularly relevant to new communication technologies including anonymity, privacy and surveillance, and technology apprehension.

CMST 5270. Communicating in Multinational Organizations. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the influence of culture on communication in organizations. Global comparisons in organizational communication including analysis of European, Asian, and Latin American corporate cultures. Explores intercultural communication in U.S. organizations.

CMST 5320. Philosophy of Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Outlines foundational theories and concepts regarding rhetoric's contribution to our understanding of reality, knowledge, truth, and certainty. Topics include the role of rhetoric in the construction of our knowledge of science, politics, ethics, religion, law, gender, and culture.

CMST 5330. Freedom of Speech. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines definitions, issues, problems, and requirements for protecting or curbing free expression of speech in areas such as defamation and invasion of privacy; religious-moral heresy; provocation to anger; commercial speech; time, place, manner and institutional constraints; and prior restraint. Analysis of landmark cases and contemporary public arguments.

CMST 5360. Rhetoric of Social Movements. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the rhetoric of social change and methodologies for analysis and appraisal of social movement discourse. Traces rhetorical strategies through contemporary movements including civil rights, feminism, Native American, anti-nuclear, abortion, gun control, Ku Klux Klan, and others.

CMST 5400. Cross-Cultural Communication in the United States. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the dynamics of cross-cultural communication in the U.S. and obstacles to effective interaction across American co-cultures. Examines the interpersonal patterns of selected ethnic groups, races, religions, and social classes in the U.S. with the aim of improving cross-cultural understanding and communication.

CMST 5500. Health Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Provides an introduction to the field of health communication. Examines the role of communication in health care with a focus on provider training and the provider-patient relationship. Discusses and applies theoretical models for developing effective health communication programs within a variety of health care settings.

CMST 5600. Communication Consulting. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces communication consulting and the design implementation of communication audits for corporate and non-profit settings. Surveys various models of consulting. Teaches how to design and implement a communication audit that includes needs assessment, interpretation, and recommendations. Methods of audits include survey design, interviews and focus groups.

CMST 5810. Directing Speech Activities. 3 cr. hrs.

Theory and practice in the organization and management of co-curricular speech activities in high school and college.

CMST 5953. Seminar in Communication Studies. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Special subjects of seminar to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Variable topics.

CMST 6200. Organizational Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores historical, contemporary and ideological approaches to the study and practice of organizational communication. Topics include: organizational culture, workplace relationships, participation and decision-making, organizational change, organizational justice, and organizational communication consulting.

Communication Courses

COMM 5100. Mass Media and the American Family. 3 cr. hrs.

The impact of the mass media on family communication patterns, familial value structures, development of children, and orientation to news media. Examination of news, advertising, and entertainment content from educational, cultural and economic perspectives. Emphasis on empirical social science research which examines relationships between media and families.

COMM 5200. International Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

History of the comparison among present structures of national media systems and the role of journalism within them. Principles of international news flow, gatekeeping, impact of technology, and the relationship between developing countries. Exploration of various models of press-government relationships.

COMM 5300. Introduction to Survey Research in the Communications Media. 3 cr. hrs.

How to conduct and understand the results of political polls and other forms of sample surveys in the communications media. Includes a discussion of ethical considerations in survey research, an introduction to principles and techniques of sampling, questionnaire construction and interviewing, practice in data analysis and related reasoning, and the presentation of results for various audiences.

COMM 5330. Health, Science, and Environmental Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of and practice in communication of health, science, environmental, and risk information with the public and other non-experts, especially through mass, specialized and new media. Includes overview of some current issues.

COMM 5330. Health, Science and Environmental Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of and practice in communication of health, science, environmental, and risk information with the public and other non-experts, especially through mass, specialized and new media. Includes overview of some current issues.

COMM 5500. Race and Gender Issues in Mass Media. 3 cr. hrs.

Surveys the past and present relationship between women and racial and ethnic minorities in the United States and the mass media. Specifically, the issues of how women and people of color are portrayed in the news and entertainment media, the role of ownership, employment and access to the media institutions will be studied. Women's Studies elective.

COMM 5550. Media and the "Other". 3 cr. hrs.

Analysis of media created for and by a wide array of audiences, especially those outside of what is sometimes called "mainstream" media. The ways in which social and cultural ideas of "us" and "other" are formed, reinforced, and sometimes challenged through the media lens are identified and debated. Students consider and identify the power of media to form and honor (or dishonor) identity and whether it is possible or desirable to produce media that are identity-neutral.

COMM 5600. Media Management. 3 cr. hrs.

Staffing, organization, economics, salaries, law, labor negotiations and community relations as involved in the mass media. Theoretical and practical approaches to the problems of management.

COMM 5650. Cultural Identity, Media and World Religions. 3 cr. hrs.

Framed through a media lens, studies the diversity of ethnic and spiritual beliefs that make America multicultural and religiously pluralistic. Examines manifestations of religion in print and electronic news, advertising and public relations, the uses of media by religious groups, bias and prejudice about religion in the secular media, and bias about secularism in religious media. Deconstructs consumer and material culture, and offers a critique of cultural consumption based on philosophies embedded in world religions. Uses a variety of media in instruction.

COMM 5700. Media and Politics. 3 cr. hrs.

How the news media cover politics and how politicians deal with news coverage. Emphasizes recent presidential campaigns, with special attention to ethical issues, the impact of new media, campaign advertising and strategies used by politicians and journalists.

COMM 5750. Media, Technology and Culture. 3 cr. hrs.

Draws on books, films, television shows and other elements of popular culture to consider the historical and conceptual foundations of new media technologies and their impact on contemporary culture.

COMM 5951. Marquette Led Travel and Study Abroad:. 3 cr. hrs.

Course taught in an international setting by Marquette professors and where students earn Marquette credit. Study Abroad expenses apply.

COMM 5953. Seminar in Communication. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Special topics of seminar to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Variable topics.

COMM 6001. Communication Theory in Context. 3 cr. hrs.

An introduction to communication theory as both intellectual and professional practice, with special attention to how it applies to the study of organizations; media; health, science, and the environment; public life; technology; and relationships.

COMM 6002. Communication Research in Action. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores professional and scholarly applications of research methodologies related to issues and problems in the study of organizations; media; health, science, and the environment; public life; technology; and relationships.

COMM 6100. Qualitative Research Methods in Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of theory-based qualitative research applied to professional and scholarly problems and the effective communication of research results. Based on the fundamentals of theory and research methods offered in COMM 6010 and COMM 6020. Prereq: COMM 6010 or equiv. and COMM 6020 or equiv.; or cons. of instr.

COMM 6150. Quantitative Research Methods in Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of theory-based quantitative research applied to professional and scholarly problems and the effective communication of research results. Based on the fundamentals of theory and research methods offered in COMM 6010 and COMM 6020. Prereq: COMM 6010 or equiv. and COMM 6020 or equiv.; or cons. of instr.

COMM 6250. Communication as Ethical Practice. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the role of ethics in professional and scholarly life. Students will learn ethical theories, how to analyze a communication related ethics problem, derive and answer a normative-question related to the problem and learn to critically analyze and evaluate texts from a variety of communicative settings. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

COMM 6810. Digital Communication Strategies for Content. 3 cr. hrs.

Discusses strategies for creating and evaluating textual, audio, and video materials for different platforms and audiences. Focus varies; topics may include: digital content management, writing for the web, branding and social journalism. Course topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6815. Digital Communication Strategies in Metrics. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores methods used to measure the impacts and effectiveness of digital communication across a variety of audiences and platforms (text, audio, video, and web). Focus varies; topics may include: measurement, analytics, user experience and the integration of return on investment (ROI). Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6820. Digital Communication Strategies for Technologies. 3 cr. hrs.

Teaches the use of technology in digital communication in various forms, including but not limited to persuasion, history and entertainment. Includes hands-on practice in constructing multimedia messages and students learn the art of storytelling using print, visual and aural media. Focus varies; topics include the integration of multimedia and various technologies to enhance the interactivity of platforms. Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6825. Digital Communication Strategies for Leadership. 3 cr. hrs.

Focuses on the use of communication leadership theories to coordinate organizational practices in an era of widespread technology and new media use. Focus varies; topics may include: digital communication management, executive communication via digital communication, project management, legal and ethical issues posed by new technologies and reputation management. Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6850. The Craft of Digital Storytelling. 3 cr. hrs.

Introduces students to the use of technology in storytelling in various forms, including but not limited to persuasion, history, and entertainment. Includes hands-on practice in constructing multimedia messages, and students learn the art of storytelling using print, visual and aural media.

COMM 6900. Storytelling in Public Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores the basic narrative structure of storytelling and provides a theoretical basis for ways of gaining effectiveness, given who tells the story, who the intended audience is, the purpose of the story and the means for telling the story.

COMM 6931. Topics in Communication. 3 cr. hrs.

Directed individual/group investigation of a selected topic or problem in communication. May be taken more than once when topics vary. Prereq: COMM 6000 and COMM 6050; cons. of the associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 6953. Proseminar in Health, Science and Environment. 3 cr. hrs.

Explores media and communication practices that shape public discussions of health, science and environmental issues. Focus varies; topics may include: managing risk and uncertainty, health communication, science and public policy and crisis communication. Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6954. Proseminar in Media. 3 cr. hrs.

Analyzes media as social, cultural, political and economic institutions. Focus varies; topics may include: the political economy of media, sports and media, the sociology of communication and media rituals. Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6955. Proseminar in Organizations. 3 cr. hrs.

Analyzes organizations and organizational practices from a variety of theoretical and applied perspectives. Focus varies; topics may include: organizational rhetoric, systems theory, strategic communication, crisis communication and corporate communication. Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6956. Proseminar in Public Life. 3 cr. hrs.

Analyzes the rhetorical and political practices that help sustain the public life of democratic societies. Focus varies; topics may include: persuasion and propaganda, free expression, rhetoric and civic life, and argument and public discourse. Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6957. Proseminar in Relationships. 3 cr. hrs.

Analyzes personal communication, focusing on the development of relationships and the interpretation of meaning in everyday personal interaction. Focus varies; topics may include: family communication, conflict, interpersonal communication, gender and communication and intercultural communication. Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6958. Proseminar in Technology. 3 cr. hrs.

Examines the role that communication technologies have played in creating new models of social order, reshaping the forms of political and economic power and transforming group identity and personal life. Focus varies; topics may include: the history of the Internet, the use of communication technology in organizations, digital media and the global order and technologies of surveillance. Seminar topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

COMM 6961. Special Institute/Workshop/Project. 1-3 cr. hrs.

COMM 6964. Communication Practicum. 3 cr. hrs.

Course guided practical field experience. Students apply communication theories and perspectives while working within a chosen communication field. Possible sites include public relations firms, corporate communication departments, advertising agencies, media organizations, human resources departments, health communication departments and training and development organizations.

COMM 6995. Independent Study in Communication. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of the associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 6997. Capstone in Digital Storytelling. 3 cr. hrs.

Students integrate what has been learned across previous courses and create a microsite devoted to a subject that is relevant to personal or career goals.

COMM 6998. Professional Project in Communication. 1-3 cr. hrs.

S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch., approved project proposal and cons. of the associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 6999. Master's Thesis. 1-6 cr. hrs.

S/U grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; approved thesis outline and cons. of the associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9970. Graduate Standing Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9974. Graduate Fellowship: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9975. Graduate Assistant Teaching: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9976. Graduate Assistant Research: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9977. Field Placement Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept.

COMM 9978. Field Placement Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept.

COMM 9979. Field Placement Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept.

COMM 9984. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

COMM 9985. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

COMM 9986. Master's Comprehensive Examination Preparation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.

COMM 9991. Professional Project Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9992. Professional Project Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9993. Professional Project Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9994. Master's Thesis Continuation: Less than Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9995. Master's Thesis Continuation: Half-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

COMM 9996. Master's Thesis Continuation: Full-Time. 0 cr. hrs.

Fee. SNC/UNC grade assessment. Prereq: Cons. of dept. ch.; cons. of associate dean for graduate studies.

Digital Courses

DGMD 5260. Documentary Production. 3 cr. hrs.

Students create documentary digital media projects that employ non-fiction story structure and advanced techniques of shooting and editing, including hand-held and stationary camera, audio and microphone techniques and field lighting. Students learn documentary theory and history, and also master project research, development, production and editing techniques. By developing individual voice and storytelling techniques, students create original, meaningful non-fiction works.

DGMD 5275. Advanced Television Production and Direction. 3 cr. hrs.

Development of program-length dramatic and non-dramatic productions for television, cable, educational, and corporate distribution. Particular attention to the integration of the various media used in television production and to legal and financial considerations.

DGMD 5450. News and Information Gathering. 3 cr. hrs.

Analysis of the community with a view to the problems and opportunities for the broadcast media on the political, public, administrative, financial and commercial, labor, social welfare, and educational affairs of the community.

DGMD 5615. Radio Programming. 3 cr. hrs.

Examination and case study analysis of the contemporary radio industry. Emphasis on music formats, news, talk, sports, syndication, and other sources of program material. Audience demographics, profiles, ratings, and promotions. Practical experience in applying for FCC license.

DGMD 5620. Television Programming. 3 cr. hrs.

Analysis of television programming theories. Includes data-based criticisms of different programming strategies. Primary emphasis on prime-time network entertainment programming; includes consideration of effective programming for other "day parts" and news. Students will program their own network on the basis of theories and data provided.

DGMD 5800. Digital Media Law and Policy. 3 cr. hrs.

Focuses on contemporary problems in media law and policy. Emphasis is placed on the Internet, mobile and social media, broadcasting, broadband and emerging technologies and on the most current legal and policy controversies and debates affecting those media. Students debate and seek to resolve law and policy problems while also studying and critiquing policymaking processes.

DGMD 5810. American Television: 1946-Present. 3 cr. hrs.

Historical, cultural and commercial growth of American television, with special emphasis on programming, from pre-commercial beginnings to the present. Key genres, persons, issues and trends in the development of American prime-time television.

DGMD 5830. Early History of Broadcasting. 3 cr. hrs.

History of the American system of broadcasting from its inception to approximately 1950. Examination of the technological, social, cultural, economic and political forces which shaped the industry. Emphasis on the roles of the broadcasters as agencies of information and entertainment by an analysis of trends in radio and early television programming.

DGMD 5931. Topics in Digital Media. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Various topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Includes extensive screening and/or other activities. Lecture/lab format.

Journalism Courses

JOUR 5110. Persuasive Writing. 3 cr. hrs.

An advanced writing course giving directed practice in the work of moving readers to assents and to acts according to the principles of Aristotle's rhetoric as they apply to the instruments and techniques of journalism.

JOUR 5120. Feature Writing. 3 cr. hrs.

Writing a range of features for newspapers and magazines, from short stories to profiles, using narrative nonfiction and literary journalism techniques.

JOUR 5130. Critical Writing. 3 cr. hrs.

An advanced writing course giving understanding and directed practice in the arts criticism function in the mass media. Reviewing books, plays, films, television, music, restaurants primarily for print media. Development of critical theories for evaluation of the arts.

JOUR 5140. Depth Reporting. 3 cr. hrs.

In-depth research, analysis and reporting on a problem, issue or situation in the political, public, administrative, financial, educational, social or welfare aspects of a community. Use of public records, interviews, and observations. Building a news series, creating a package of news and editorial material.

JOUR 5150. Investigative Reporting. 3 cr. hrs.

Identification and development of a story or series or events exploring a problem in a public institution. Use of computer data bases, printed records and interviews to analyze a current situation. Developing a series which presents the problem and the perspectives of individuals involved and affected.

JOUR 5160. Narrative Nonfiction. 3 cr. hrs.

Emphasizes longform journalism, stresses strong reporting, immersion in a single subject over the entire term, in-depth interviews and detailed observation. Students work individually, turning in portions of their work weekly, and produce a publishable 10,000 to 15,000 word article as the final project. Prereq: Cons. of instr.

JOUR 5200. Publications Editing. 3 cr. hrs.

Editing principles and practices for print and online news publications. Editing copy, photos, charts and graphs; verification of information; writing headlines and captions. News judgment, wire services, backpack journalism, digital newsroom; digital production software.

JOUR 5310. Communication of Urban Issues. 3 cr. hrs.

Study and practice of communicating urban issues with public with an emphasis on reporting in various forms of media. Scope and types of media in the modern metropolis. Media interaction with political and social forces in the urban environment. Audience use of news media and other sources of information about urban issues.

JOUR 5320. Religious Journalism. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of, and practice in, mass media coverage of contemporary religion with an emphasis on the Catholic Church. Purposes and practices of religious publications; religion coverage in the secular media.

JOUR 5340. Business and Economic Journalism. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of, and practice in, mass media coverage of business and economic issues. Survey of business publications and business reporting; economic publications and economic reporting. Corporate reports, forecasting, market information, and other publicized data. Management, labor, and other corporate problem areas.

JOUR 5350. Sports Journalism. 3 cr. hrs.

Study and practice in journalism dedicated to sports and general reporting on sporting events, figures and the industry. Survey of sports publications and online news services; news and feature reporting on sports in general publications. Media interactions with sports owners and figures. Reporting strategies for major sports. Special attention to multimedia formats.

JOUR 5400. Media Entrepreneurship. 3 cr. hrs.

The business side of being a journalist: management, financial, practical and professional issues running an online or print publication, operating as a backpack journalist, working as a freelancer. Management structures, business practices, contracts and marketing.

JOUR 5500. Newspaper Design and Production. 3 cr. hrs.

Fundamentals of design and production for print and online newspapers. Develops skills in working with separate and integrated print and online delivery systems. Introduction to digital forms of news content for online news publications: audio, video, slide shows and podcasts. Digital production software.

JOUR 5510. Magazine Design and Production. 3 cr. hrs.

Fundamentals of magazine design and production. Develops understanding of basic elements of publication design and critical skills through analysis of various design problems. Prereq: Computer workshop or demonstrated proficiency on the Macintosh computer with current design software.

JOUR 5520. Web Design and Production for Journalists. 3 cr. hrs.

Fundamental principles of processing and managing information in verbal and visual forms for Web publication. An emphasis on special editing and design issues created by the online environment and internet technology. Legal and ethical issues on the Internet. Prereq: Computer workshop or demonstrated proficiency on the Macintosh computer with current design software.

JOUR 5600. History of American News Media. 3 cr. hrs.

The origin and development of journalism in the United States considered in relation to American political, social and economic history. Consideration of newspapers, magazines, the electronic media, and important figures within each field.

JOUR 5800. School Publications. 3 cr. hrs.

The special nature and functions of school publications. Their educational value. Projects in planning publications to fit their nature and functions. The role of the publication adviser. Lecture/lab format.

JOUR 5932. Advanced Topics in Journalism. 3 cr. hrs.

Advanced reporting and producing of news stories on a single topic that varies by semester.

JOUR 5953. Seminar in Journalism. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Specific subjects of seminars to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Variable topics.

Theatre Arts Courses

THAR 5200. History of Theatre. 3 cr. hrs.

A chronological survey of theatre history from its origins to 1914. Particular emphasis paid to major periods of theatrical achievement, studying conjectural and documented styles in acting, design and production methods.

THAR 5210. Contemporary Theatre. 3 cr. hrs.

A survey of 20th century theatre practice from modern European theories of the late 19th century through Postmodernism. Special attention given to innovative aspects, such as surrealism and expressionism, epic theatre, the absurd movement, multi-media presentations, environmental theatre and multi-media presentations.

THAR 5220. History of Clothing 1. 3 cr. hrs.

The study of clothing from historical perspectives. Clothing examined within sociological, artistic, and economic context. Clothing regarded as essential to Western culture, studied for a better understanding of peoples in different cultures and epochs.

THAR 5230. History of Clothing 2. 3 cr. hrs.

The study of clothing from historical perspectives. Clothing examined within sociological, artistic, and economic context. Clothing regarded as essential to Western culture, studied for a better understanding of peoples in different cultures and epochs.

THAR 5240. Period Styles. 3 cr. hrs.

Period movements as they relate to period clothing, decorative arts, architecture, music, etc., as they relate to different styles of theatrical performance and apply to actors, directors and designers.

THAR 5320. Crafts for the Theatre. 3 cr. hrs.

Studies techniques that encompass traditional and new materials, which may be used in special projects often encountered in the creation of props and costumes. Includes casting and molding, thermoplastics, mask making, foam carving, jewelry, armor, etc.

THAR 5340. Advanced Costume Technique. 3 cr. hrs.

Covers advanced methods of costuming such as beginning pattern drafting, basic tailoring techniques, fabric modification through dyeing and painting, millinery, and costume crafts construction.

THAR 5360. Theatre Management. 3 cr. hrs.

Study and practice of theatre management and publicity. Lab requirement in production and/or stage management.

THAR 5400. Costume Design. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the aesthetic and practical application of costume design and how it relates to the theatrical production process. Includes research, script analysis and costume renderings for in-class projects.

THAR 5420. Lighting Design. 3 cr. hrs.

The study and practice of theatrical lighting script analysis, research and planning techniques. Culminates in a realized collaboration.

THAR 5440. Scenery Design. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the principles and practices of designing scenery for the stage.

THAR 5500. Advanced Play Direction. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of interpretative styles of play direction, rehearsal techniques, audience analysis, and contemporary trends. Opportunity to test principles in assigned laboratory productions.

THAR 5600. Playwriting. 3 cr. hrs.

Study of the structure and execution of dramatic scripts for theatre. Assignments to write and analyze scenes and one-act plays.